Script Writing

Discussion in 'Fan Films, Fan Audio & SciFi 3D' started by gameboyry, Jul 21, 2002.

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  1. gameboyry Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Jul 9, 2002
    star 1
    What is in your opinion the best way to write a script. E.G. think of a scene write it down and worry about where it goes later. Or write from beginning to end straight?
  2. Master_Jedi_David Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    May 24, 2002
    star 2
    Personally,
    I like to write down a scene story first. Then, later on I will finally write the scene. This allows time in the midde for brainstorming ideas and their relation to other events.
  3. gameboyry Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Jul 9, 2002
    star 1
    Yeah i have all these ideas in my head and no idea how to get them out. I'm just gonna write scenes as they come to me.

    Another Question:
    Anybody out there from or around Ramona California, in southern Ca? Soon I'll be looking for extra's and help with effects and such.
  4. gameboyry Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Jul 9, 2002
    star 1
    Heres an excerpt from a scene im working on now


    EXT. Space-
    We see a starship fly across the screen, it is a transport much like a buss.

    INT. Space Buss
    DAHN sits in a corner hoping nobody will talk to him. He sit next to an enormous slob of a creature. CAMERA pans across the crowd in the buss finally locking on to an older man sitting in the opposite corner. The man is looking straight at the CAMERA. He is dressed in a traditional Jedi outfit. CUT back to DAHN looking at this man. The man gets up and walks in front of the huge slob.

    Kalor Klaric
    (to slob)
    Why don?t we switch seats?

    SLOB
    (smiles)
    Why don?t you stick your head out the door?

    Kalor Klaric
    (waiving hand)
    Why don?t we switch seats?

    SLOB
    Hey you wanna switch seat?
    (he gets up and moves over to the Jedi?s former seat)

    DAHN
    How did you do that?

    KALOR KLARIC
    The force can be used to manipulate the weak minded.

    DAHN
    The Force?

    KALOR KLARIC
    Now what planet where you born on to not have heard of the force?

    DAHN
    Hatrae

    KALOR KLARIC
    Hatrae? Never heard of it, then again there are so many planets out there arnt there?

    Dahn
    What do you want old man?

    KALOR KLARIC
    May I sit, your rather large friend has taken my seat.

    Dahn
    If I say No will you use your power on me?

    KALOR KLARIC
    No, the force can only be used to manipulate the weak of mind

    Dahn
    What makes you think I?m not Weak minded?

    KALOR KLARIC
    I can feel the force in you, just as you can feel things


    Dahn
    Like What?

    KALOR KALRIC
    (sitting)
    You can feel when other feel pain, fear, hope. You feel cold when you are near someone who does not like you.

    Dahn
    I feel cold all the time.

    KALOR KALRIC
    I can teach you control how much you feel these things.

    Dahn
    (interested)
    Tell me more.

    FADE






  5. gameboyry Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Jul 9, 2002
    star 1
    Wow that was really cool and bump.
  6. buliwif Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Mar 28, 2000
    star 4
    for me, a story begins with one scene... it can be anything from a word to a whole action sequence. and as i sit and think about it, another scene will pop into my head... and another, and another, untill i have a group of unrelated, or related scenes... i will work them over in my mind until i have each scene worked out completely... then i will begin the task of joining them together on paper... basically this consists of adding background, fleshing out the characters... building the story in a way that when you get to these "prefabricated" scenes, they will make sense within the storyline... that's how i do it, anyway...
  7. grand_admiral_ewok Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Nov 27, 2001
    star 4
    I agree with that, actually. Some of my stories have evolved from preconceived images of scenes that I've had. These scenes are generally pivotal ones and that's how I'm able to expand the story from them.
  8. muphicks Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Aug 20, 2001
    star 2
    I don't think there is anything wrong with doing either method, you could work out a story and then write all the scenes. Or you could work out loads of cool scenes and make them.

    Making small scenes would be a nice test to see how much work is involved and how well you can do. Then when you come to make your full film you will have a better experience.

    The method I found that worked for us was to think of loads of different scenes, then we thought of a story and decided if any of the scenes would fit, or modified them and created new ones.

    One thing I found that really helped when writting a script was to never mention the camera of panning around etc. That way when you read it back, it is more like a book, you imagine the angles yourself and are not stuck with a set shot.

    This will really be important if you are having someone else direct. However even if you are doing it all yourself it helps to put camera angles in after finishing the entire script. That way you can first check the story works, then you can make a 2nd script (shooting scritp) with angles and shots in and will be able to visualise how all the shots fit together.

    But when all is said and done, its all a matter of personal preference, try any method, if it works for you, stick with it, if not try some of the other suggestions and see how you go with those.

    bye.
  9. darynvallon Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Sep 24, 2001
    star 1
    Well, the most important thing is to have the whole story in your mind before writing anything. So what you have to do first is to imagine scenes and try to find a link between them. If you succeed everything is easy, you just have to write. I really think the best is to write from beginning to end straight. It's more easy because everything you thought take a "real" form in your mind and you just have to make it sense.

    After, you have to create your characters with their own personality but this is something else ;)

    Greg.
  10. WormieSaber Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Oct 22, 2000
    star 5
    I would make a list of your characters and their backgrounds/personality to start. Try and flesh out your characters before you begin typing the actual script, then write a one page outline, from beginning, middle to end. Then, simply begin with scene 1; FADE IN.
  11. Semaj Ovured Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    May 8, 2000
    star 4
    Three words ... STRUCTURE STRUCTURE STRUCTURE.

    Starting with a scene is fine, but you need to build a structure around your idea.

    A great book is MYTH IN THE MOVIES by Stuart Voytilla. It examines 50 different movies (Star Wars included) in a variety of genres from sci-fi to western to romantic comedy to horror to action.

    Each film is examined according to the heroic mythos and broken down in structure.

    It's an excellent book to have as reference. I used it to study when I wrote ROGUE.

    Another good site is SHARKS AND STRUCTURE over at [link]http://www.exposure.co.uk/eejit/]Eejit's Guide to Filmmaking[/link].

    Having structure gives you a road map. Sure, you can go off the map from time to time, but you won't get lost in your storytelling if you rely on those three words ... STRUCTURE STRUCTURE STRUCTURE.
  12. steveskywalker Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Apr 27, 2002
    What I'm doing for my first fanfilm is: I wrote down all the characters on notebook paper and their backrounds(personality, history, likes, etc.), listed all the places in my story, and then what then put them all together to form a complete story. For script format, I'm making a Master Scene Script( ex. Ext. Planet -- Continuous only)
    and then once I'm done I'll put all the shots in to make a Shooting script (ex. Closer -- Character or Back up -- character, etc.) That way I can get all the main stuff down first and I can worry about the little details later.

    "But, hey, that's just me." :)
  13. Various Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    May 15, 2002
    star 2
    I make three things when I begin writing.

    The first is a character list. Names and a small bio (mostly I can just write a sentence long reminder and remember the rest I came up for the person).

    The second is a brief description of the entire story. The major goals, characters, events, etc. This is rarely as long as it sounds, usually only about two paragraphs. I do this mostly for the same reason a company makes a 'mission statement,' you know, keep it on track.

    The third is where the first real work comes in, the outline. Pretty much self explanitory. Everyone as their own way of doing an outline so work it however you want to.

    Most of my stories start out with a few independent scenes. I will often write these out before I get anything else done. Basically I write one scene at a time and then try to work it into the outline later. The real trick is to get all those detached parts to flow.

    Since we're talking about scripting here, focus mostly on dialogue. I usually write out all the dialogue before I'll even touch the description, mostly because it's my favorite part. Besides, getting that out of the way first allows you to sort of sit with it for a while. Like when you're working on the descriptive text you can always look back at the conversations and think of new things to do with them. I like doing it that way so I'll be forced to re-read the dialogue and end up re-writing it a few times before I get all the description done.

    Hope that helps.
  14. AWB1989 Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Jul 3, 2002
    star 5
    i like to create storyline and write the entire script. and go back and finish it and add some more scenes and add more to the characters bios and more to the environments and stuff like that....
  15. gameboyry Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Jul 9, 2002
    star 1
    Waht nobody wants to say sometining about my piece? Is it that bad?
  16. Various Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    May 15, 2002
    star 2
    I read it over. Too be honest there isn't much there to critique yet. It looks okay so far.

    Does the Jedi always after to wave their hand when they do the mind trick? Obi-Wan did in between drinks. Ah, that Kenobi. Everytime he gets some alcohol in him someone loses an arm.
  17. gameboyry Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Jul 9, 2002
    star 1
    Acually to use the force requires no physical movment at all but most Jedi find it easier to do so.
  18. Kingleonard Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Jun 18, 2002
    star 1
    I am by no means an expert, but I find it best to work out the basic characters and story structure first, then flesh it out. For long films that requires sitting down and writing a scene by scene premise, but for a short I can usually nut it out in my head. Once you have that you can start fleshing out the scenes with dialog and scenery. I find when I write that as the story continues the characters begin to take on their own personalities. Having written the story I can go back and add scenes, edit dialog or story elements to match what it has now become as a whole.
  19. jbird69 Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    May 11, 2000
    star 4
    I usually have an idea or premise and a few ideas after that. I like to write a treatment first, which is a story synopsis. Then I get all of the characters and their backstories down. Then I go about the script. Oh, and I write it on paper first. I just can't seem to get it out on a comptuer first. I don't know why, but that is just how I am I guess.
  20. Trest Jedi Padawan

    Member Since:
    Jul 18, 2002
    Interesting, Gameboyry.

    Keep running with your idea.


    My ideas seem to jumble around in my head and never make it to paper.

  21. WormieSaber Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Oct 22, 2000
    star 5
    When you can't seem to get the idea out of your head, start writing it anyway. Something will click somewhere and then you can begin where the story begins to flow.
  22. SHATM Jedi Youngling

    Member Since:
    May 22, 2002
    Structure structure structure is right. Get it right and stick with it, very important.
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