Amph Sherlock - new BBC series from Steven Moffat

Discussion in 'Community' started by Mar17swgirl, Jul 21, 2010.

  1. AaylaSecurOWNED Force Ghost

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    The program ExPat Shield worked for me when I wanted to watch the Olympics without NBC ads streaming DURING GYMNASTICS ROUTINES. //bitter
  2. solojones Chosen One

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    Ah I will check that out thanks. I also tried to do that during the Olympics.

    Edit: Oh I see the problem.. only for PC. I will have to wait until I get my new laptop.
  3. Everton Chosen One

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    The iPlayer is actively promoted as an alternative to watching on the TV. So... people do that. I've watched something for the first time using the iPlayer once or twice (when I've forgotten to set record). I'm sure there are lots of people who use it to catch up more often.
    Last edited by Everton, Nov 27, 2012
  4. solojones Chosen One

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    Still, the question remains... why not let outsiders pay a license fee to use iPlayer? If there were enough people using it to require upgrading the servers, they'd also be making a bunch of money. The only thing I can figure is that they worry it would hurt their US showings and network deals. I suppose that might apply to some of their series that air on HBO.
  5. Mar17swgirl Chosen One

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    But if BBC did away with the regional IP block and allowed people worldwide to pay for and use the BBC iPlayer, they'd make more money!

    BBC, why don't you want my money? *headdesk*
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  6. Everton Chosen One

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    Administration? Raking in the licence fee from everyone who should be watching is not easy. Plenty of people here cheat the system. Or try. Anyone in the UK can buy a TV or computer and watch BBC output without actually coughing up a penny. You don't get a code to allow you to watch once you've paid. The fear is in being caught by random checks. If the iPlayer were made available in other territories keeping tabs on who has paid versus who is watching would be even tougher than it is now.
    Last edited by Everton, Nov 27, 2012
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  7. solojones Chosen One

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    Well that's their own fault. They obviously shouldn't have iPlayer accessible in all of the UK without a password. No, it wouldn't end the cheats, but come on, if you don't even try giving people a log on that's your own fault. Hell, you can't watch CNN or other cable network things you're supposed to pay for like HBO Go here unless you log in with your cable/satellite provider.

    As far as what would make them more money... yeah, I don't know. Part of me feels like they'd make more by allowing people from any country to buy a license fee for online viewing. However, there's no guarantee about how many people would do that. I'm not sure there's any way to know how successful that would be. It seems like it's worth looking into... but see, I don't know how much money they make from selling their programing to oversees networks. And then there's Netflix. If the episodes are all available on iPlayer, it lessens the exclusivity of Netflix streaming. So I can see the reasons they might be hesitant to do it for creative programing that might actually make them more in their current overseas licensing system.

    I really wish I could at least watch BBC news, though.
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  8. Everton Chosen One

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    Additionally, if those overseas were able to pay the licence fee, that would allow them a stake or say in the running and output of the BBC. Maybe not immediately, but the unsettling principle of overseas viewers funding a broadcaster that doesn't cater for them would soon filter through. It would be very difficult politically, I should imagine. The corporation is derided as it is from within these shores - attacked by government and the press and regulated and held accountable to the existing British audience. I dread to think about the problems a whole new set of dissenting voices might cause.

    Don't mistake me, I'd love for my friends overseas to be able to watch the BBC legitimately, but the funding of the BBC is a big delicate issue and I can't see such a change ever happening.
  9. solojones Chosen One

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    Well, I would think you could charge a lesser fee for online viewing only and make it clear that this doesn't mean you get a stake in it. Or make it so you at least have to be a UK citizen.
    Last edited by solojones, Nov 27, 2012
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  10. Everton Chosen One

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    If you charge a lesser fee for viewing overseas, then lesser fees necessarily become an option here in the UK. That would never fly. Particularly given that practically everything the BBC airs is on the iPlayer. Also, the BBC wouldn't get away with telling those who fund it (and that's what the overseas money would be doing) that they have no stake in the output. That's the deal with those in the UK, and so it would have to be the deal outside it. It's a fundamental principle of the BBC's relationship with its viewers... you pay us and we're yours.

    EDIT: And a lesser fee becomes an issue of increased administration, of course.

    EDIT EDIT: Massive typo discovered and corrected.
    Last edited by Everton, Nov 27, 2012
  11. I Are The Internets Chosen One

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    I really really liked what I've seen of this show. Obviously I need to watch the whole thing on Netflix. Cumberbatch and Freeman have great chemistry, and I would say that what I've seen is a lot better than the Guy Ritchie films even though those were pretty darn fun. I eagerly await the next series with baited breath.

    Kinda disheartening to see that Elementary has become a hit. It just looks so bland compared to everything else that is playing on CBS. To each their own I suppose.
  12. AaylaSecurOWNED Force Ghost

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    Wait are you a troll? I don't understand how ANYTHING can seem bland compared to the network that brings you CSI: Omaha and sitcoms with laugh tracks that play even when no one's telling a joke.
    Last edited by AaylaSecurOWNED, Nov 27, 2012
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  13. yankee8255 Chosen One

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    On the BBC thing, I suspect it's a bit more complicated -- on the one hand BBC wants to have an exclusivity window for as long as it can, but it also wants to sells the rights to PBS and stations, both public and private, around the world. Obvoiusly they're not going to get as much if everyone can watch the shows right away on the bbc site/player.

    As for downloding, here's the thing I was alluding to earlier: if you live in a smaller country (like Austria in my case, or Slovakia in Mar's) Netflix isn't here, neither is Amazon#s unlimited streaming service from the US or it's lovefilm service from GB, Germany and a handful of other countries. There are some Netflix-style equivalents, but with far more limited libraries (especially when it comes to TV series) and even fewer streaming choices. So you'd like like to watch a recent blockbuster movie, or the latest season of your favorite TV show? For movies, you may be able to rent it on iTunes (they don't offer all the movies that are for sale for rental, at least not in Austria - it's probably not even half). For Tv shows, they simply aren't available for rent, on iTunes or anywhere else. Why? Because the movie and television industry insists on negotiating rights deals with companies like Netflix and Amazon on a country by country basis. How absurd is this? An interview I read with a Netflix exec described it this way: you go to negotiate the rights for country X (you'd like to negotiate for countries Y, Z and A-W as well, but the other side won't go for it). Negotiations go for months, but you finally get them don. A few days/weeks later, you move on to negotiating for country Y. You go to the same building, negotiate with the same people on the other side, but starting from the same point every time, as if all previous negotiations for other countries had never existed. When push comes to shove, Netflix and Amazon are willing to go through this for large markets like GB or Germany. But Austria or Slovakia? Not a chance. Netfix and Amazon have started lobbying in Brussels to have an EU-wide licensing scheme put in place, but so far the film industries lobbyists still have the upper hand.

    Thing is, I don't buy alot of DVDs. Seinfeld, BSG, Sex and the City (for my wife, really;)) a few handfuls of movies. I tend to watch things a few times and then move on. When I had a Blockbuster just around the corner I used to rent pretty regularly. I'd certainly sign up for Netflix or lovefilm if it were available here, but with family life, I can't be bothered to drive to one of the few dvd-rental stores here in Salzburg (the closest is about 0 minutes away). Because of how few there are, their terms are pretty ridiculous: 4-5 euros per day, and they count the day you pick it up as one day, which is especially absurd when you consider that they close at 10pm and don't have a drop box. And since the wife and I usually aren't sitting in front of the TV before 9pm (putting the kids to bed, cleaning up the kitchen, finishing the millions of other things most adults have to do most evenings), watching a DVD is a 2-3 evening endeavor. So having streaming available would be a godsend. But I'm not holding my breath.

    Obviously there's also the delay factor. For me there's also wanting to see things in English (an issue especially with TV series, which are almost always only broadcast in German here - Austrian public TV does simulcast the English track for some shows, but not many -- not Sherlock, for example). But leave that last part aside. For a large part of the Austrian market, the convenience of streaming is only available "illegally", and only because of the pig-headed idiocy of the film industry. You'd think they'd have learned their lesson from what happened to the music industry, but apparently not.
  14. I Are The Internets Chosen One

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    I worded that wrong. Oops. Look at my avatar and you will feel better.
  15. Juliet316 Chosen One

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    Yeah, but the BBC would likely charge extortionistic prices like they did when PBS tried to keep Classic Who (as well as reruns of the Tennant/Piper season). The high licensing fee BBC tried to charge PBS is mostly what got Classic Who yanked off PBS.
  16. solojones Chosen One

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    Thank God for Daily Motion
  17. Juliet316 Chosen One

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    And YouTube. You can find some Classic eps there.
  18. Strilo Manager Emeritus

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    Also Dani I like How I Met Your Mother and Partners...
  19. solojones Chosen One

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    So my mom went to great lengths to get this for me for Christmas, since it's only sold in the UK and Amazon UK for some reason wouldn't ship it... but it got here in time for a New Years game:

    [IMG]
  20. soitscometothis Force Ghost

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  21. Darth McClain Arena Manager Emeritus

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  22. Juliet316 Chosen One

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  23. SithLordDarthRichie London CR

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    Cool-looking game.


    Shame there is going to be a delay in filming the show, but given what the creators and stars are currently involved in it is understandable. Maybe there will be a longer series to make up for it :p




    Regarding the issue raised earlier -


    Overseas transmission is a problem, I myself watch The Clone Wars online because I have no wish in paying for Sky in order to see it 6months down the line when it airs here. Movies have a similar issue, if there were more worldwide releases on the same day then fewer people would feel the need to pirate movies (not that people can't just wait).
    I'm not sure what the BBC can do, Everton explained the problems involved with charging overseas viewers to use iPlayer. I do think though that some stricter controls on people who can view iPlayer in the UK should be looked into, it's ridiculous that you can just watch stuff without having to pay. The government knows most things about us, surely it can give the BBC the means to know if someone attempting to view iPlayer is doing so from a location with a registered license-fee payer.



    Even if it's HD quality, most people don't have TV-sized monitors nor do they sit on sofas while watching stuff. I'd rather watch it on a 32+inch TV in the comfort of my living room with other people than my 20inch (or less on a laptop) PC monitor in a corner of the room in a not-so-comfortable chair. Plus if it's a recording I can skip the commercials anyway as I normally do since I'm not always home Sunday nights to watch it.
    I agree the gap in overseas transmissions should be closed, or at least shortened significantly.


    I think a lot of that is to do with being forced to pay for it instead of it being optional. Most people love the BBC and what it offers, but there are those that don't watch it and therefore dislike being made to pay a fee just to be able to use their TV.
    I personally don't see the big problem, it's not exactly massively expensive and for a home with lots of people it's good value.
  24. ophelia Cards Against Humanity Host. Ex-Mod

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    From Benedict Cumberbatch's Facebook page, which appears to be maintained by a rather touchy friend: "The creators of Sherlock keep changing the dates of when filming starts so i hope this will please all you NEGATIVE fans: Filming will start in the time span of early 2013- 2014." S/he goes on to state that there are no dates yet, and to complain more about negative comments. I don't think this person understands the internet. :p Anyway, it's a bummer we'll have to wait longer for Sherlock. :(
  25. NYCitygurl NSWFF Manager

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    [face_laugh] That's hilarious. But a bummer about the wait :( Kudos to Freeman and Cumberbatch for becoming so popular, though!