Significance of the binary suns

Discussion in 'Star Wars Saga In-Depth' started by drth sidious, Oct 7, 2004.

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  1. drth sidious Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Jul 24, 1999
    star 2
    I saw this mentioned somewhere before (not sure if it was here), but I noticed some interesting symbolism with Tatooine's binary sons. First, Anakin in AOTC. As he is searching for Shmi, we see him with the setting suns in the background. When those suns rise again, Anakin has began his journey along the dark path.

    Next, Luke in ANH. He stands outside and watches the suns set. The next day, he has begun his journey to become a Jedi, and ultimately, redeem his father.

    Also, the music seems to parallel this. The music score is identical until it splits into Duel of the Fates for Anakin, but kind of mellows out for Luke.

    This is indeed interesting, if it is in fact intentional.
  2. Veraden Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Oct 6, 2004
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  3. Depa Billaba Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Jul 21, 1998
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    That is kind of interesting, but did you say that the suns were rising when Anakin started his journey as a Dark Lord? I think the binary suns would have been a lot more significant if they were setting.

    Depa Billaba
  4. RebelScum77 Manager Emeritus

    Member Since:
    Aug 3, 2003
    star 6
    Well regardless of the rising sun thing... the setting suns are certainly symbolic. Both and Anakin and Luke have major decisions to make (one could say their greatest decision of ANH/AOTC) as those suns set. The difference is, Anakin's symbolize the beginning of his journey down the dark path, while Luke goes for the light (one could also say in hindsight that he begins his journey to "save" Anakin from his own decision). They're sort of poignant "what if" moments. Hell, you could even say that the two suns represent the two paths. Duality is a common theme in SW.
  5. Moog Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Apr 23, 2003
    star 1
    I think they're setting in both films... night closely follows both those scenes...
  6. drth sidious Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Jul 24, 1999
    star 2
    They are setting in both films. The next time they rise though, both characters lives will change.

    What I would love to do, but can't find a feasible way as of now, is to have these two sequences play simultaneously. The best way would be to get two TVs, and have one play the ANH sequence, and the other the AoTC one. That would be really neat.
  7. I_Shot_First Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Oct 11, 2004
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    An interesting idea of the parallels between Luke & Anakin, and OT & PT
  8. ben_07 Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Aug 8, 2002
    star 4

    I think the same can be said of the TUSKEN RAIDERS.

    Episode 1: Appear when Anakin is on his path to become a Jedi

    Episode 2: Cause Anakin to start path to dark side.

    Episode 4: Appear as Luke is on path to find Artoo, meet Obi-wan, and ultimately start path to becoming a Jedi.

  9. b-wingmasterburnz Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    May 27, 2004
    star 3
    Perhaps when Shmi says that Anakin can't stop change no more than he can stop the suns from setting, it's symbolically linking the twin suns' cycles and major life decisions.
  10. Smuggler-of-Mos-Espa Jedi Youngling

    Member Since:
    Jan 23, 2002
    star 6
    Of course that would be true. I always thought there were vast possibilities of Tatooine symbolisim that has never been brought into focus. Very interesting.
  11. Atticus Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    May 31, 2002
    star 4
    They're sort of poignant "what if" moments. Hell, you could even say that the two suns represent the two paths. Duality is a common theme in SW.

    Well one sun is red while the other one is white.
  12. Zee Zee Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Feb 19, 1999
    star 2
    I always felt it was more symbolic in that Anakin has made his choice (to find his mother - whatever the cost) and rides off into the setting suns, whereas Luke stands and watches his last setting suns still unsure what his future is and what choices he has yet to face..
  13. Chaotic_Serenity Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Oct 10, 2004
    star 4
    We also see a sun rise occurring in outer space in ESB after Luke escapes Cloud City, a strong representation of the most pivotal moments in his character's story. Of course, sunsets/sunrises have always been objects of literary metaphor, so it's not surprising. The twin setting suns represent Luke's feeling that opportunity has been lost with them, only to rise again with the next sun. Blah, blah, blah, symbolism is fun.
  14. CMR Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Mar 1, 2002
    star 4
    uhh.....the suns were setting for both of them (Anakin and Luke)
  15. byrdnest Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Apr 11, 2001
    star 1
    there is also the dual meaning of the homonym sun/son. there are two sons/suns. it is always the son that is the hero, not the father. anakin's time is up when he becomes the father anyway. for the father, nothing.
  16. Chaotic_Serenity Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Oct 10, 2004
    star 4
    uhh.....the suns were setting for both of them (Anakin and Luke)

    From a certain point of a view. </Ben>

    Remember, when a sun sets on one side of the planet, that means it's dawning in another. The illusions of their former lives are gone. Luke and Vader now have a new burden to carry with each other.
  17. Rylis Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Nov 1, 2004
    star 1
    I've really never thought of the suns having that much of a role in the films. But it makes since w/what everyone is saying. Its kinda weird that when the suns do set, a death takes place. (Anakin see Shmi die, the next time Luke sees Owen and Beru, they are dead.)
  18. DarthMyBoy Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Nov 29, 2003
    star 1
    Interesting theory drth, although I dont think GL intended for anything with that. I always just thought it was rather cool looking, seeing those suns set.
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