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Lit Star Wars Adventures & SWA: Forces of Destiny comics (IDW)

Discussion in 'Literature' started by spicer, Apr 14, 2017.

  1. Vthuil

    Vthuil Force Ghost star 5

    Registered:
    Jan 3, 2013
    ...I can't help but wonder now whatever happened to Kablob.
     
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  2. Ancient Whills

    Ancient Whills Force Ghost star 5

    Registered:
    Jun 12, 2011
    Star Wars Adventures #9 and Star Wars Adventures Annual 2018 solicits.
    [​IMG]
    (W) Sholly Fisch (A) Jamal Peppers (CA) Nick Brokenshire
    Droids take center stage in both stories of this comical and exciting adventure! C-3PO might be in over his head as he takes on a new job, and IG-88 is determined to capture his crafty bounty!
    In Shops: Apr 04, 2018
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    (W) John Jackson Miller (A/CA) Jon Sommariva
    With Leia injured, it's up to Luke to undertake a sensitive diplomatic mission with the easily-irritated Sarkans! What should be a routine meeting soon turns into an action-packed adventure with the fate of the galaxy on the line!
    In Shops: Apr 04, 2018
     
  3. spicer

    spicer Jedi Master star 4

    Registered:
    Nov 14, 2012
    Finally, the JJM story comes in April.
     
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  4. Ancient Whills

    Ancient Whills Force Ghost star 5

    Registered:
    Jun 12, 2011
    I don't know why but I got the impression the artist is using stills from the animated shorts and it's very weird, especially considering how none of the other have done that so far. At least now we know how Barriss will look like if she ever appears. And as I originally suspected, it is an adaptation with some new content.
     
    Last edited: Jan 24, 2018
  5. Barriss_Coffee

    Barriss_Coffee Chosen One star 6

    Registered:
    Jun 29, 2003
    This is starting to get eerily like that weird Tiss'shar comic with Vader or worse, Serphidian Eyes.
    [​IMG]

    It's like there's this urge to draw lizard societies in old-fashioned earth clothes.
     
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  6. spicer

    spicer Jedi Master star 4

    Registered:
    Nov 14, 2012
    I fail to see the problem.
     
  7. TiniTinyTony

    TiniTinyTony Jedi Grand Master star 6

    Registered:
    Mar 9, 2003
    So I just read SWA - FoD - Ahsoka & Padme and Rey, and I thought they would be new stories, but essentially they're just drawn versions of the video stories we already got. Pretty lame.
     
  8. tatooinesandworm

    tatooinesandworm Jedi Knight star 3

    Registered:
    Jul 30, 2015
    Now go read SWA - FOD - Leia and Hera, cleanse your pallet, and feel better about he issues with the last one coming out being an original story as well (Rose and Paige).

    Unfortunately, they weren’t all original stories. Hopefully it was successful enough for them to do another run with All original stories. The Leia and Hera issues were pretty excellent though.


    Sent from my Ornithopter using The Force
     
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  9. TiniTinyTony

    TiniTinyTony Jedi Grand Master star 6

    Registered:
    Mar 9, 2003
    Thanks, I just finished reading those. Hera felt like a good Rebels story and Leia was really good. Only thing I wondered in the Leia story was where was Luke? I figured Chewie could be fixing the Falcon.
     
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  10. Senpezeco

    Senpezeco Jedi Master star 2

    Registered:
    Apr 27, 2014
    Tried to transliterate the names and remarks on Padmé's datapad from FoD #4, for anyone curious:

    [​IMG]

    POSSIBLE THREATS
    TO DELEGATION


    Atenna Olypo
    Recently negotiated
    smuggling routes near
    Arthuria; an alliance with
    Republic jeopardizes this.

    Snet Groot
    Sold arms to Separatists,
    likely to hire a bounty
    hunter to disrupt delegat—

    Selder Psalm
    Known Separatist ties,
    base located on Coruscant.
     
  11. Ancient Whills

    Ancient Whills Force Ghost star 5

    Registered:
    Jun 12, 2011
    http://www.starwars.com/news/explor...-idw-star-wars-forces-of-destiny-ahsoka-padme

    StarWars.com: The comic begins just before the animated short “The Imposter Inside,” with some lightsaber sparring between Ahsoka and Barriss Offee. As you were expanding on the short, what made you decide to reintroduce this particular Jedi Padawan into the mix?

    Beth Revis: I’ve always loved Ahsoka’s arc in the Clone Wars cartoon, and in particular felt that her final interactions with Barriss were really crucial to her character. We see a bit of their friendship, but the focus of the story is obviously how that friendship ended. Barriss and Ahsoka both had very different but equally passionate ideas about what it meant to be a true Jedi. They forged a friendship in spite of those differing perspectives, but they both obviously found some sort of common ground. That’s what I found fascinating — their magnetic-like attraction and repelling of their principles.

    StarWars.com: Valentina, of the five comics in this series, your style on this issue adheres the closest to what the crew at Ghostbot, Inc. did for Forces of Destiny, the animated micro-series. What made you decide to maintain that stylization for your comic?

    Valentina Pinto: Working for the most part as a colorist, I became versatile both for the design and for the color. [In talking] with Denton [Tipton], one of the fantastic editors of this series, we thought it would be great that a number of this series had the same style as the shorts of animation from which they were inspired…It was really fun for me [working] with color; I thought I was working on a cartoon!

    StarWars.com: Beth, you’re no stranger to the Star Wars universe, having previously penned Rebel Rising, following the life of Jyn Erso between her adoption by Saw and her appearance as a prisoner in Rogue One. What’s the biggest challenge in writing a comic book versus a full novel?

    Beth Revis: I’m very used to writing narrative where I have to describe everything and often find a poetic way to express what’s happening visually with words. It was both challenging and a lot of fun to let go of that. I tried to leave a lot of room for Valentina to put her own signature in the work, and I tried to only give detailed descriptions when I felt it was necessary to the plot. It was freeing in a way, but it took a concentrated effort to not try to control every aspect of the story!

    StarWars.com: For a series that dedicates the spotlight to individual characters, it also does a tremendous job of showcasing teamwork both in-universe and behind the scenes. What advice would you give someone about collaborating on a narrative that includes ideas from two creators in the finished work?

    Valentina Pinto: To work in a team is to create an alchemy and a collaboration. I must say that we found ourselves right away and it was really stimulating for me! It is an experience that I recommend to everyone in their professional life.

    Beth Revis: One of the things I’ve learned from writing for Star Wars is that it belongs to everyone. Prior to contributing to the canon, I felt a deep ownership of these characters. They meant so much to me growing up, that I just wanted to clutch them to me. But once I started working with other creators to develop more stories for Star Wars, I realized that these characters and stories belong to everyone. They are an almost universal love within our human culture, and one of the few stories that translates throughout the world. Because of that, I have actually found it really easy to let go of “owning” the characters. Padmé and Ahsoka and Leia and Hera and Rey and all the others are important to me, but not less important to anyone else. It’s incredibly easy to find a way to tell a story about them, because they are such clearly defined characters that almost everyone can identify with. There’s very little compromise because it’s not needed. The characters almost write themselves, as if they were real people.

    StarWars.com: Did you have any input on what characters you would focus on?

    Beth Revis: This was the first story I was offered, and I jumped on it! I’ve always loved Ahsoka for her courage at the end of her original story, to choose her own path. And Padmé has long been a favorite — although I particularly loved the action she took in The Clone Wars. She was never afraid of danger, but she always moved with grace. There’s something stunning about a person who can do that.

    StarWars.com: The whole Forces of Destiny animated series has focused on small moments and decisions as essential building blocks of a person’s character. Ahsoka is wrestling with some serious self doubt here, great foreshadowing for things to come in The Clone Wars. Why do you think it’s important to include those moments of reflection and uncertainty for your characters?

    Beth Revis: Adding in those moments of doubt make the characters more human (even if they’re not human). That’s actually something I really loved about the way the story has developed past the original trilogy. In the original three movies, there was a clear black-and-white picture of good and evil, right down to the clothing the characters wore. The prequel trilogy played with that concept of how our choices dictate what we become, but I think we’re seeing that even more in the new movies — there is doubt, and fear, and those play heavily in our choices about ourselves. It’s easy to see Luke as a hero based on the original trilogy, but I actually quite love the way the past is killed in the new movies — it reminds us that there is no perfect good or evil.

    StarWars.com: How did you first discover Star Wars and what turned you into a fan?

    Valentina Pinto: I discovered Star Wars the first time when I was little girl but I did not remember so much. However, I’ve reviewed the films recently. My travels [to] Disney Parks have made me even more a fan.

    Beth Revis: I first discovered Star Wars thanks to my parents’ old video tapes. They recorded the movies when they came on television, so our version of Star Wars still had all the old commercial breaks. It’s strange for me now to watch the movie without them! I don’t recall the first time seeing the movies; they just always were. My brother and I would go into the field and forest near our house and pretend to be on Endor, using old PVC pipes as lightsabers.

    StarWars.com: How would you describe this mini adventure in your own words?

    Valentina Pinto: This mini adventure speaks of strength, how to have confidence in yourself, and how friendship and collaboration can be the most powerful weapon against the forces of evil.

    Beth Revis: This adventure is about learning to trust yourself by trusting others.

    StarWars.com: The ever-expanding Star Wars universe has given us novels, films, and animations dedicated to these characters. What were you studying for inspiration?

    Valentina Pinto: Although my approach to the story is the one closest to the animated shorts, I was inspired by everything now on Star Wars, so a lot of stuff. It was a beautiful journey, in this fantastic universe of Star Wars and I hope so much that it is not the last one.

    Beth Revis: For this particular work, I went back to the cartoons. I watched a lot of The Clone Wars in preparation for developing Saw in Rebel Rising, and I just kept watching them over and over again for Ahsoka’s development in this comic. I also, of course, loved EK Johnston’s novel Ahsoka.

    StarWars.com: And how do you know when you have the dialogue, the movement, and the story just right for these characters in particular?

    Valentina Pinto: When everything while drawing becomes spontaneous and natural without sacrificing quality and myself. And I hope this will shine from the pages for you, too.

    Beth Revis: I tried to put myself in my shoes as a kid — when I was younger, what did I want to see my heroes doing? I wanted them to be able to kick butt and fight, but I also wanted them to know when they could rely on others. I tried to find a balance between Ahsoka being a fighter, and Ahsoka realizing that she could still be friends with someone.

    StarWars.com: When you look at the finished comic now, what are you most proud of? And what aspect or individual detail gave you the most difficulty?

    Beth Revis: For me, the hardest pages to write were the beginning — staging the first fight and finding a way to have that fight reflect the entire rest of the story. I don’t think I nailed it on my own; it was seeing Valentina’s art bringing that fight to life that really made the scene come alive and be true to the characters.

    Valentina Pinto: I’m proud of the total result — story, art and lettering. [Being asked to illustrate a full comic does not often happen for someone] working expressly as a cover artist or colorist. For me, every [day] was a joy and a challenge. I hope you enjoy our work and have fun with Padmé and Ahsoka!
     
  12. Vthuil

    Vthuil Force Ghost star 5

    Registered:
    Jan 3, 2013
    I'm not sure which I'm happier about: the name "Snet Groot", or the fact that the guy who has it is like the most generic-looking blond dude ever. :D
     
  13. lordpixie

    lordpixie Jedi Knight star 1

    Registered:
    Aug 30, 2015
    Egmont star wars adventures uk issue 31 has the story Tales from wild space "The flat mountain of yavin" from IDW SWA issue 2.
     
  14. Ancient Whills

    Ancient Whills Force Ghost star 5

    Registered:
    Jun 12, 2011
    Forces of Destiny: Rose & Paige preview.
    [​IMG]

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    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  15. Jedi Jessy

    Jedi Jessy Force Ghost star 5

    Registered:
    Feb 28, 2016
    AWWWWWWWWWWWWW [face_love]
     
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  16. Ancient Whills

    Ancient Whills Force Ghost star 5

    Registered:
    Jun 12, 2011
    http://www.starwars.com/news/inside-idw-star-wars-forces-of-destiny-rose-paige

    StarWars.com: Delilah, you’ve gotten the chance to pen not one but two Tico sister stories for IDW, including a tale in Star Wars Adventures #6, which also just came out this month. The Ticos haven’t yet appeared in the Forces of Destiny animated micro-series and in The Last Jedi we didn’t get to see them interact on screen. What was it like stepping in to fill in some of their backstory knowing what was in their future?


    Delilah S. Dawson:
    It was a unique process that involved keeping oodles of secrets. I read the script for The Last Jedi in November 2016 (so I could write Star Wars: Phasma), which means I knew what happened to Paige and how Rose took on a starring role. In order to write the comics, I also needed to read an early draft of Cobalt Squadron by Elizabeth Wein and Phil Noto so that I had some context for Paige’s personality and speech patterns. For a little while there, I was one of the only people in the world who knew the story of the Tico sisters! And when I saw Paige onscreen, I was completely gut punched, in part because I knew her character so well already. It was an honor to write about Rose and Paige. To me, they’re the heart of what the Resistance means: ordinary people willing to make sacrifices in the hopes that other people and planets won’t have to suffer.

    StarWars.com: How do you know when you have the dialogue, the movement, and the story just right for these characters in particular?

    Delilah S. Dawson:
    I don’t actually know until I see the words with the art, if I’m honest. It’s all about staying true to the character’s heart. For Rose, she’s scrappy and clever and multitalented but ultimately doesn’t think of herself as a hero or anyone special. We all agreed that she would kind of freak out when Poe talked to her, and that she would always be in awe of Leia. For Paige, she has more confidence and is good at her job, but as long as she’s not piloting or acting as gunner, she believes that Rose’s ideas are the way to go. Their love for one another and their drive to do what’s right are definitely a chord they share.

    StarWars.com: For me, Rose is a really relatable character because she’s smart and she works hard, but she’s also a little unsure and insecure about her ideas. The whole Forces of Destiny animated series has really shined a light on how important small decisions and moments of bravery can be in shaping a person’s character. Why do you think it’s equally important to include those moments of uncertainty and self-doubt?

    Delilah S. Dawson:
    When I was a kid, I was so focused on getting good grades and praise that I never took any risks at all. As I’ve gotten older, I’ve learned that hard work and tenacity will take you further than being born with any talent, and that you can’t grow without taking risks. Rose has these great ideas, but she does doubt herself. Luckily, her sister Paige is there to encourage her and cheer her on. In both of my Rose and Paige stories, I wanted to give Rose moments where she had an idea, doubted herself, was emboldened by Paige, failed a little, kept going, and ultimately succeeded. That, to me, gave her context for her increased confidence and strength in The Last Jedi.

    StarWars.com: Rose has so much genuine fascination with the world around her. She’s in awe of the heroes in the Resistance, the machinery that keep it running, and the natural world. But not everyone she meets finds her to be endearing. Lazslo in particular seems to regard her as a nuisance, maybe because of her age. In your mind, why is Lazslo such a curmudgeon and how do you think his skepticism defines Rose?

    Delilah S. Dawson:
    So here’s a fun bit of trivia: I based Lazslo on Lazlo Hollyfeld from Real Genius. While the original character was a gentle, kind, introverted genius, I wanted to create a kind of Bizarro Lazslo, an older guy who is very sure of himself and his ways and doesn’t want to think outside the box or consider how the younger generation might do something differently. We think of the Resistance as the good guys, which makes it easy to forget that everyone in the movement has flaws, and some of them are straight up jerks. He’s supposed to be the opposite of Rose: an older mechanic who is not open to new ideas, who is world-weary and not that interested in other people. And in that opposition, he gives Rose something safe to rebel against, someone to defy. Sometimes that kind of opposition is more valuable than cheerleading and encouragement! Nothing makes me want to accomplish something like someone who tells me I can’t do it.

    StarWars.com: Nicoletta, you’ve put your artistic touch to a lot of beloved characters, from Strawberry Shortcake to the Powerpuff Girls. What has it been like stepping into the Star Wars universe and how did it influence your stylistic choices?

    Nicoletta Baldari:
    I think every project has a particular style that fits perfectly. For Star Wars, I really enjoyed working on Rose and Paige. At first, I focused on the fact they are sisters. I worked a lot on Disney’s Frozen, so knowing quite well the connection between Anna and Elsa has helped me a lot!

    I thought, Rose and Paige have fun together, so they had to be funny, but at the same time they are Resistance girls, so they also had to have some pathos on display! So I focused on their actions. Then, I tried to mold my style into the Star Wars mood.


    StarWars.com:
    Let’s talk about the squonks. What was your inspiration for these bearded, bird-like creatures? They feel very ostrich-like to me.

    Nicoletta Baldari: Aha! I actually started from an ostrich, with some attributes from other animals. A little goat, a funny rabbit, so I worked like a “drawing chef” mixing together all these ingredients! But every squonk is very particular, they take care of their beards, and they’re definitely cute.

    Delilah S. Dawson: My husband and I have been together for over 20 years, and we’ve been leaving little hand-drawn notes the entire time, often with characters we’ve made up. Back in 2001 or so, we came up with two kinds of birds called squonks and squeepies. I put the squeepies in Phasma, so I had to find a way to use the squonks! For these particular creatures, I wanted to combine the two most ridiculous animals I know: ostriches and goats. I’m a little beard-obsessed right now, owing to my next book, Kill the Farm Boy, which has a running gag about how it’s difficult to do magic without a beard. The creatures were my first love in Star Wars: the Ewoks, all the interesting aliens in the cantina, Salacious Crumb, and the rancor in Jabba’s palace. I love getting to create new critters!

    StarWars.com: How did you first discover Star Wars and what turned you into a fan?

    Delilah S. Dawson: I always knew about Star Wars as a kid, but what really drew me in were the Ewoks. I mean, I was six, and they were murderbears who were kind to little girls! I soon had a collection of stuffed Ewoks, a bunch of action figures, Colorforms, and books. I grew to love all the movies and saw the prequels in the theater, including being late for our wedding’s rehearsal dinner to see Attack of the Clones at the first possible showing. I played the RPG and card game and read the EU books, including that time I fell off a treadmill when Chewie died. Over the years, my love of Star Wars has only grown, and the new movies are taking us into the next generation. Seeing them in the theater with my kids is such a gift and delight.

    StarWars.com: Delilah, writing about Rose and Paige is quite a departure from your recent work focusing on Cardinal and Captain Phasma. Instead of a bitter rivalry, the Ticos give you a chance to explore a sisterhood dynamic that, full disclosure, made me a little misty. As a writer, what draws you to these complex bonds between characters and how do you make them feel authentic on the page?

    Delilah S. Dawson: Whether I’m writing a villain or a hero, the most important thing is to identify that character’s heart, the core of their personality. What do they want, and what are they willing to do to get it? I take in as much media as I can so I can hear their word choice and cadence, see their facial expressions, notice what they wear and how they move through the world. Backstory is important, too — knowing what experiences made them who they are. Rose and Paige are all about their bond with each other and their shared tragic history that propels them to heroism, while Phasma is all about sacrificing anyone and anything to stay alive and get ahead; Cardinal is nothing to her but a speed bump on the road to greatness.

    StarWars.com: Star Wars does an amazing job of harking back to classic films and tropes. What were you looking to for inspiration for this project?

    Delilah S. Dawson: For Forces of Destiny, I wanted that same feel of Leia lost and alone on Endor. Her vehicle broken in a forest, she couldn’t communicate with her people, and then a helpful creature (although let’s all admit the Ewoks are sentient beings!) showed up and ultimately helped her find her sibling.

    StarWars.com: When you look at the finished comic now, what are you most proud of? And what aspect or individual detail was the most challenging for you?

    Delilah S. Dawson: I definitely feel like Nicoletta’s art steals the show here, so I guess I’m proud that I gave her a framework to create such an amazing and beautiful story. The colors in the jungle and the hilariousness of the squonks — I just adore her interpretation. The most challenging thing was figuring out how to get Paige’s car over a barrier that Rose’s can’t cross. I tried to describe the deadfall from Pet Sematary, but what Nicoletta came up with is so much prettier.

    StarWars.com: At the start of this project, did you have any input on what characters you would focus on? And if so, what made you decide on Rose and Paige?

    Delilah S. Dawson: I was offered the chance to write Rose and Paige, and I didn’t hesitate for a moment. I’m a huge fan of the Tico sisters and wanted to help the world see how great they are. I consider them such wonderful role models for kids, a study in finding people who lift you up and believe in you and in using that belief to do what you can’t do alone.
     
  17. BigAl6ft6

    BigAl6ft6 Force Ghost star 6

    Registered:
    Nov 12, 2012
    Ohhh, just started reading "The Perfect Weapon" by Delilah and read the IDW Star Wars Adventures comic so that makes it a monthly hat trick!
     
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  18. Jedi Jessy

    Jedi Jessy Force Ghost star 5

    Registered:
    Feb 28, 2016
    Jurassic World 2 looks amazing
     
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  19. TiniTinyTony

    TiniTinyTony Jedi Grand Master star 6

    Registered:
    Mar 9, 2003
    I hope I don't sound like a Lazslo, but I didn't really like the Rose and Paige story. It felt very Disney-fied and it probably didn't help that it was drawn that way as well. Instead of a "You can do it, Rose!" from Paige, how about Paige offering a hand? Maybe seeing the two of them work together to accomplish a goal instead of Paige just being a cheerleader. Then she goes from cheerleader to damsel in distress. At the end of the day, it could have been Rose and random friend. Maybe my expectations were too high.
     
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  20. Rebel-Jedi

    Rebel-Jedi Jedi Master star 1

    Registered:
    Jan 26, 2005
    Is the upcoming Annual going to be included in a collected edition? I also wonder if the Free Comic book Day issue will also be included.
     
  21. BigAl6ft6

    BigAl6ft6 Force Ghost star 6

    Registered:
    Nov 12, 2012
    Yah the Rose and Paige one was okay if only because I kind of liked the cartoon-y art. And I Don't mind Rose being the one who had to build some transports.
     
  22. bsmith7174

    bsmith7174 Jedi Knight star 3

    Registered:
    Apr 17, 2015
    Star Wars: Adventures (free preview)
    This is part of an onging IDW comic book series, and the first of the three-part young Solo storyline by writer Cavan Scott will be released as part of Free Comic Book Day. The heroes are targeted by bounty hunters familiar to fans of The Empire Strikes Back — Zuckuss and 4-LOM.
    [​IMG]

    Star Wars: Adventures, Issue #10
    “They’re being chased by the bounty hunters and go to a planet they don’t know,” Siglain says. “Once they get into the atmosphere, everything shuts down and the Falcon crashes into the water.”
    [​IMG]

    Star Wars: Adventures, Issue #11
    “Everything on this planet is powered down, and no technology works,” Siglain says. “Then they figure out a way to turn it on and realize that was the worst mistake they could make — the planet comes alive and attacks them.”
    [​IMG]
     
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  23. Jedi Jessy

    Jedi Jessy Force Ghost star 5

    Registered:
    Feb 28, 2016
    Han Solo has blue eyes?
     
  24. Rebel-Jedi

    Rebel-Jedi Jedi Master star 1

    Registered:
    Jan 26, 2005
    Last edited: Feb 16, 2018
  25. Barriss_Coffee

    Barriss_Coffee Chosen One star 6

    Registered:
    Jun 29, 2003
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