Symbolism of the scenes between Padme and Anakin

Discussion in 'Attack of the Clones' started by SmoovBillyDee, Aug 30, 2002.

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  1. jedi-ES Jedi Padawan

    Member Since:
    Jun 7, 2002
    star 4
    With any good work, your perspective will change with time.

    The most important thing that GL does with younger persons is that he gets there attention and interest.

    Then when they are older, they will look for more in the movies, and they will find it and be able to appreciate the depth of the story and the mythology and the complexity of the saga.

    In regards to the dinner scene, which I think is fabulous, two symbols are there that shows part of the hero's journey that Anakin is on: the "forbidden fruit" and Padme. Both the fruit and the woman are symbols of life. The Jedi, though seemingly more connected to life than anyone else, are also because of their artificial rules, kept them the farthest from life as well.

    Anakin, as the hero (in mythological terms), is meant to break through rules and barriers, and one of those is life and its creation. By being with Padme, he is experiencing something that the other Jedi have sworn to stay away from. And rather than seeing it as a negative, could be seen as a positive because in that experience he is able to express more of himself than would be possible if he stayed within the rules.

    Also, remember what comes from their union: Luke and Leia.

  2. Lady_Sami_J_Kenobi Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Jul 31, 2002
    star 6
    PLJ,

    I did not say I only concentrated on the dialogue in the SW movies. I only said I concentrated on the dialogue in the love scene, especially because it was so stilted. This totally detracted from and IMO, destroyed the subtler imagery presented.

    If GL were a better dialogue writer, he would have made the dialogue and the imagery fit together in a seamless whole so that intense scrutiny would not be necessary to understand the meaning and beauty of the scene.

    Now I can see a little better what the critics are looking for and why they don't see what the average viewer/fan sees. Keep giving me lessons in this and maybe I will be better able to articulate what I see as wrong with these films.

    Little hint: How can you make a movie for children where the child (Luke) is asked to kill his father?

    If Lucas wants to be taken seriously again as a filmmaker, and I think he does, he'd better start paying attention to making the movies a seamless whole.
  3. PadmeLeiaJaina Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    May 23, 2002
    star 6
    The meditation scene is another favorite scene of mine. The scene radiates. From the sun trying desperately to break through the morning clouds, to the fresh water on the balcony floor, the scene is glorious. Although a new day dawns, and promises glorious beauty, a storm brews with our young lovers.

    Back on Coruscant Padme wore a very Victorian covering nightgown, showing how self conscious she was with Anakin watching her. Yet here she is after rejecting him the night before, wearing a very revealing nightgown. Again, her choice of clothing reveals what her heart wants, not what her mind wants.

    Now after she has rejected him at the fireplace, she realizes her mind said completely opposite of what her heart is saying. She no longer feels the need to be bashful, or worry about Anakin looking at her. In fact she would welcome his attention. Anakin however, does not turn around and look at her throughout most of the scene. When he does, he doesn't even acknowledge her revealing nightgown, further distancing himself from her.

    Anakin is also at ease in the morning, not yet ready to take on his Jedi Duty, trying to calm the conflict within. It's an interesting scene when you think of Vader standing similarly on the Executioner looking out the window. This monster man once beheld absolute beauty, and not just beheld it, but added to the beauty himself. Anakin is gorgeous in that scene. From the soft light and how it makes his face glow and soften, to the gauzy sheer fabric of his undershirt, he has never looked more human and heroic. In fact the way his undershirt falls reminds us of Luke's shirt in ANH. Again showing the different paths for father and son.

    The scene is fascinating, if you watch Padme, about 3 or 4 times she gives Anakin a quick lookover from shoulder to toe, admiring her view. All the while she is listening to him, yet she is getting more flustered. She breathlessly tells him she will go with him. The beauty of Naboo does not captivate her nearly as much as her handsome young protector. (This is something I caught at about my 10th viewing- again major subtlty in NP's acting.)

    Anakin is completely in a state of conflicted hell, which is of course at odds with the beauty around them. Padme soothes him, her rationality usually helps to calm his over emotional storm. He uses her first name once, but when he tells her he needs to go save his mother, Anakin refers to Padme as Senator. The man inside is desperately working to distance the 2 and to remind himself that he is her protector, not her lover.

    Padme ignores his professional attitude and offers her support, the support of a girlfriend. She doesn't once think of herself, her safety, her duty. She is now bound only to him.

    When Anakin apologizes at the end of the scene, "I'm sorry, I don't have a choice," it's really the first heartfelt apology we feel coming from him throughout the film.

    Although brief, the scene leaves a lasting impressing, probably because it is so fleeting, their innocence is floating away on the wind....
  4. Grilled-Sarlacc Former Head Admin

    Member Since:
    Jul 19, 2001
    star 6
  5. Darth Mischievous Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Oct 12, 1999
    star 6
    Excellent posts and insightful observations, PadmeLeiaJaina.

    :)
  6. Kaui-Gone-Jim Jedi Youngling

    Member Since:
    Aug 19, 2002
    star 3
    Fantastic posts! The un-enlightened (non-SW) think sci-fi is all about rocketships and aliens - you proved them wrong...
    I loved that fireside scene - it added a lot of emotional depth to the film. GL, I salute you!
    Like the old Rocky and Bullwinkle cartoons, the SW films come at you from several levels, where kids can enjoy Jar-Jar, and teens/adults can get into 'the Force', and so on.
    Peace,all:)
  7. Movealong Jedi Youngling

    Member Since:
    Jul 29, 2001
    star 1
    PadmeLeiaJane - I thank you for sharing your thoughts on this forum. You speak directly from my heart. Your insights into Star Wars express my feelings.

    In addition to the visuals stand the dialogues in the movies. The dialogues show, where the characters want to be, show their dreams and wishes, what they cannot let go of.

    This addition is very well played out in the fireplace scene. PLJ already has described the difference between the body language and the spoken word in this scene.

    The dialogue there shows Anakin´s unconditional love for Padme. A love that is not willing to be held by any barrier or frontier. A love that is searching for ways to break barriers or at least avoid them in secrecy.

    In this scene there is also a difference between Anakin and Padme positioning towards their feelings.

    I get the impression that Anakin is the only character in Star Wars representing true feelings: unconditional love, unconditional anger, unconditional hate - with no holding back by thoughts, discipline, codes or duties. That´s why he is the Chosen One. That´s why he is representing the Force. He is pure feeling. Deity inhibited in man. Man inhibited in god. His dreams are his world or at least become his world (a prophet, so to speak). His world IS a dream.

    On the other hand we have Padme. She has also strong feelings but she is more bound to the world she lives in. Her dreams have to succumb to the duties she is attached to. Her feelings have to succumb to her ratio. Thinking over feeling. The world over dreams.

    So what do we have in the fabulous fireplace scene?

    We have the FORCE - a deity represented in Anakin. And we have Padme representing the world.

    The Force longs to become one with the world. To establish a bond between the trancendent and the immanent. A longing for balance between things.

    But Padme - the world - has to reject this offering, for giving in has to mean destruction for the world: duties unfullfilled, the dream over the world. (Notice how Anakin´s fate is bound to rejection and who is the only one accepting him the way he is: Palpatine - at least until Luke is entering the scene in ROTJ.)

    Rejection of dreams causes anger, doubt, jealousness. The fireplace scene is truly a crucial step to the Dark Side for Anakin. Myths show what angry, doubting, jealous (young) gods are willing to do.

    Only in the face of death Padme is speaking her TRUE feelings. She tells Anakin of her love.

    That is also crucial for Anakin´s journey: Anakin himself will become the face of death: to hear the true feelings of his loved ones. The Force becomes dark. It hides in secrecy - only to accomplish balance, only to achieve unity between itself and the world. And Anakin is the Force shrouded in a man´s body. He will accomplish this by hiding his own weak, whiny but true feelings.
    Love is the weakest of all emotions for it is easily broken. But there lies its strength.

    Anakin becomes love hidden behind a black mask. The Force becomes dark - and what he will hear in his hideout can only bring him further to and deeper into the Dark Side.

    Until Luke - in the face of death - speaks his true feelings, a Jedi like his father before him.

    Whew, didn´t know where this post was getting me when I started. So I hope this makes any sense to you people.

  8. pandawan Jedi Youngling

    Member Since:
    Jul 12, 2002
    star 1
    That is also crucial for Anakin´s journey: Anakin himself will become the face of death: to hear the true feelings of his loved ones. The Force becomes dark. It hides in secrecy - only to accomplish balance, only to achieve unity between itself and the world. And Anakin is the Force shrouded in a man´s body. He will accomplish this by hiding his own weak, whiny but true feelings.
    Love is the weakest of all emotions for it is easily broken. But there lies its strength.

    Anakin becomes love hidden behind a black mask. The Force becomes dark - and what he will hear in his hideout can only bring him further to and deeper into the Dark Side.

    Until Luke - in the face of death - speaks his true feelings, a Jedi like his father before him.


    oooh,I like this analysisvery much, Movealong!

    Anakin as love hidden behind a black mask--like it a lot!

    That is why I don't think it would work in Ep3 for anything to deeply challenge our belief in his true and deep love for Padme...
    And I like very much the parallel you point to between Padme confessing her love for Anakin only in the face of death and Luke's indicating his true and deep attachment to his father in the face of death.

    Anakin, who has such trouble being compatible with and fitting into this world *because* of his status as the embodiment of human emotion/life-energy, in his transformation to DV and the dark side, becomes the annihilator/face-of-death in his despairing inner conflict about that status (I presume that is how it will continue to be depicted in ep3) against which others can come to terms with that life-force/human energy in themselves.

    PLJ, I do so like your analysis of the symbolism in the scenes, and I agree that it is intentional.

    I believe GL intended these to be movies for kids, but not to be silly trivial popcorn flicks, or 'light' movies as Natalie Portman claimed they were when interviewed....
    I totally see that he wanted to create myths for our times, and in the tradition of Campbell's notions about myths-to-live-by. So, the action of course is part of myth--think of the Greeks!
    But the symbolism and visuals and messages are there for kids who want to see it, as well as adults. It is just so easy these days for kids who don't want or have the supports in their environment to analyse much to plop this into the category of action/adventure-eyecandy movie, which didn't exist in the same way back in 1977.

    I recall at least sensing the symbolism even as an 11 year old when I first saw SW and fell in love with the story and the imagery. My son who started watching SW with the OT on video and then moved on to TPM on VHS, and only now at 6 has seen one presented in the mainstream media movie-theater format, loves the sabers, but also gets into the emotions and relationships...he for a year now when he watches ROTJ loves to do (spontaneously, on his own) the dialogue from when Luke tells Leia she is his sister. He finds that very compelling. Now, admittedly, I think he is a rather special 6 year old...but I think if parents talk to their kids about these movies and with them about it, they can get to at least some of the deeper issues in them...

    Lucas has admitted that writing dialogue is not his forte, and that he considers himself a very visual filmmaker, so I think that it's fair game to analyse any and all of the visuals as relevant to his message. I do have my problems with needing to see a scene 10 times to notice the possible eye movements of
    an actress to indicate something though....I don't fault Lucas for that. He is reputed to be a very laid-back director, fun for many actors to work with, but therefore not the type to 'fix'things for someone who just didn't prepare enough, which I suspect is true for Natalie Portman.


  9. Lady_Sami_J_Kenobi Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Jul 31, 2002
    star 6
    I got the symbolism of the original movie, too. The Arthur legend, the other stuff.

    But, I have a problem with having to see a movie several times in order to 'see' what I should have been able to see the first time.

    And GL himself has said he made these movies for kids and everybody is reading way too much into them. His words, not mine.
  10. pandawan Jedi Youngling

    Member Since:
    Jul 12, 2002
    star 1
    Yes, he did say he made these movies for kids and that everyone is reading way too much into them...but the times he's made comments like that have been in sort of main-stream interviews with people who would tend to grill him for being too heavy, or trying to take himself too seriously. He has also done multi-hour interviews with more literary and seriously intellectual types, like Bill Moyers, where I'd bet he doesn't say stuff like that!

    (I've been trying to get myself a copy of the interview sessions he did with Moyers for PBS,called something like "The mythology of Star Wars", but it is no longer available from PBS video sales. There I take it he goes over more of his symbols and themes in the style of Joseph Campbell, whose books he claimed to have read in developing the story for ANH and the general arc for the whole saga, and with whom he claims to have had a mentorship-type relationship before he died. GL mentions somewhere I've seen recently that he read Campbell's books, but then heard him speak, and was truly wowed! JC's books, GLsaid,were OK, but the real deal, the brilliance and dynamic quality of the man and his ideas, comes thru much more clearly in person.
    It sounded like GLreally valued the time he spent with JC before his death, and JC clearly respected what GL was doing in creating modern-day myth. One of the interesting things about JC,asI read more about him and see some of his lecture tapes, was how he really loved the idea of myth as a guide to life...he eschewed his more scholarly colleagues, and their publishing in 'throw-away academic journals that nobody would read'..I think he pissed off many a 'real' scholar with his anti-university attitude!

  11. Lady_Sami_J_Kenobi Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Jul 31, 2002
    star 6
    pandawan,

    I'm going to have to invent a faces icon for tongue-in-cheek. I know GL doesn't just make these movies for kids! The themes are just too deep for kids unless their parents are also SW fans and discuss the movies with them.

    I have noticed that a great many fans who are on these boards are just teenagers. TFN took a poll and 41% of the fans responding were under 18!

    But, I do think he has taken the mythology stuff too far. He has thrown in everything but the kitchen sink. It is all getting kind of muddled now, IMHO.

    We have all the major earth religions, Norse mythology, Greek mythology with the underworld stuff and who knows what else. It would be easier to follow if he would just pick one or two and go with them.

    EDIT: If you find that Moyers interview, let me know. I have seen the other one, it's on the SE of the OT.
  12. pandawan Jedi Youngling

    Member Since:
    Jul 12, 2002
    star 1
    Lady_Sami,
    yes, that tongue-in-cheek icon would be useful indeed!
    I can be pretty dense about that sort of thing...

    Wow, I'm pretty ignorant about the newer OT editions...on a regular old VHS version, or a DVD only?
    I am one of the last people in the universe to not have DVD player (or a cell phone!).

    I don't doubt that a lot of the registered people here are younglings...people of our vintage don't do as much of this kind of forum

    Well, on the throwing in the kitchensink of myth issue--that's why its interesting and useful to do the 'comparative' analysis on myth. People like Campbell tend to focus on what is similar and parallel across the myth stories of the disparate cultures you refer to...to see what is the same at the core of the myth in Norse culture and Greek and so on...
    so, if the elements you see treated in SW remind you of Isis her or Thor there, it's not so much because GL added a pinch of Egypt there and Viking here, but because he added a little woman/earth/mother there and man/sky/father there, and those cultures did too in their own ways...
    You can see this sort of cross-referencing when JC or others analyse any myth...they tend to wander around a little in the connections they make, as one aspect of some culture's myth story reminds them of a parallel aspect of another...
    And I'd argue that some of the apparent tensions are there on purpose..a little west v east in spiritual orientation...even in the nature of the force itself, with the flowing wave-y force v the particulate centered midichlorian force...and the living in-the-moment-subject force v the unifying-meta-object force...
    GL has also said that he had a list of about 35 (you might argue too many!) themes that he wanted to include in these movies and it seemed from what he was saying that a lot of these were in these little duality packages...
  13. Lady_Sami_J_Kenobi Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Jul 31, 2002
    star 6
    pandawan,


    It's on the VHS version, too. I would watch it again to avoid the embarrassment of foot in mouth disease, but my vcr committed suicide some time back and I haven't gotten it fixed.

    I just think 35 themes are too many for GL himself to keep track of.

    I know there are many similarities across all the myths, as you mentioned. Every culture has its own creation myth and so on.

    I do avidly keep up on anthropology and it is interesting to note a couple of things, thru DNA testing, a woman who might have been the original Eve lived in Africa 250,000 years ago and all humans are descended from her.

    All cultures started in Africa and spread outward--maybe that's why so many of the myths have similar themes. I reject Jung's cosmic unconsciousness argument based on that (that we all have basic memories in our subconcious, basic archetypes. I think we all learn this stuff through our cultural conditioning). But, he was writing long before the anthropological stuff I just mentioned was discovered/developed.
  14. pandawan Jedi Youngling

    Member Since:
    Jul 12, 2002
    star 1
    Lady_Sami,
    I don't particularly buy the Jungian collective unconscious thing as the reason for the apparent existence of archetypes in the constructions of the human imagination...
    It is indeed potentially interesting to note that all humanity started at place X and moved out from there...

    But I think that aside from historical contacts and such affecting the specific elements we might see in the stories of varied cultures, we see so many of the same issues/archetypes/conflicts over and over because they are commonly experienced by humans in light of being humans...
    we are and have mothers, we are and have children, we need to separate from our families of origins, we need to strike out on our own path, we need to find our place in a group,
    we have fear, love, passions, anger...
    cultures provide guidelines about what it is to be man, to be a woman, what it means to love, to die,what the value of individual life is, what is good and bad etc...

    Any movie worth watching will course through some of these themes as it tells its story...at least one dimension along which films/stories will vary is that of the size of the field it'splayed on. SW is galactic in it's epic scale, and the 1st 2 of the PT are bigger in this way as a set-up for OT. AOTC leaves us with the feeling that the old galaxy is about to change...things come to a head, as it were,and get reduced and condensed and more pointed
    (sorry for the puss-y imagery). I really feel that the proof of GL's pudding (sorry again, to mix pudding and puss) will be in how ep3 plays out as the final piece of the bridge between the two trilogies...i so look forward to it...if GL does what he needs to do in ep3 symbollically, visually,I wager many who had serious problems with the PT will find themselves backing off at least some of the complaints...
  15. Lady_Sami_J_Kenobi Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Jul 31, 2002
    star 6
    pandawan,

    I only had a few complaints with the PT. Mainly the midi-clorian thing and the love scene dialogue.

    Every culture has its coming-of-age rituals. In some parts of Africa, a young man had to kill a lion to be considered worthy of marriage.

    In our culture, it's getting thru high school, and then deciding to get a job or go on to college.

    In the Jedi world, it's facing your fears and overcoming them, IMO. I see that as when Luke went into the cave on Dagobah and when Anakin had to leave his mother and then when he returned to find her, facing his fear at what he would find in that hut.

    And when Obi-Wan had to face Darth Maul alone, knowing his master was dying.
  16. CarcoonWarrior Jedi Youngling

    Member Since:
    Mar 20, 2002
    WELL....nice thread indeed......really interesting point of view PLJ !!
    Thumbs up !
  17. PadmeLeiaJaina Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    May 23, 2002
    star 6
    I also love the whole confession scene. It's of course the room we all know from ANH w/ Luke dreaming of his destiny and then receiveds his destiny call there.

    If you look beyond what is going on with Anakin, there is plenty to find fascinating about the scene. The jarring camera angles really enhance the drama. When Anakin stalks over to the far side of the room, he's right next to the camera, and Padme is off in the hallway. She's standing about a foot away from where the hologram of Leia will appear years later.

    Padme has an ethereal quality to her. On film, you can barely make her facial features out, she's simply glowing from the sunlight falling on her hair, her voice coming out of the light. On DLP, you can better make out her facial features, but the effect is practically the same. The shawl she wears further enhances the outfit having an angelic quality, blue is a soothing color, again the imagry comes to mind that she is water, he is sand, and sinking in it. Her outfit also is reminiscent of a Madonna dress- she is the great confesser in the scene.

    It's also interesting to think where Anakin is sitting when he is defeated is almost the same spot where Luke excitedly first asks 3PO what he knows of the rebellion. For Anakin, his path has been chosen, for Luke his destiny has called to him.
  18. Anakin_Skywalker20 Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Nov 16, 2000
    star 5
    I agree with Padme here... I agree. :) I wish i can say some more...but.. I know it is something I cannot do...cause Padme has it all. :) er said it all. ;) hehehe.


    I too also like the confession scene is powerful... makes me cry... :( but ....atleast Padme was there to comfort Anakin...cause he really needed it... after losing his mother...and all that.. :( Lonely... anywho.. peace!
  19. PadmeLeiaJaina Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    May 23, 2002
    star 6
    Anakin_Skywalker20

    There there sweetie, don't cry.... wait until 2005 -then the real tears will flow.

    Movealong


    I get the impression that Anakin is the only character in Star Wars representing true feelings: unconditional love, unconditional anger, unconditional hate - with no holding back by thoughts, discipline, codes or duties. That´s why he is the Chosen One. That´s why he is representing the Force. He is pure feeling. Deity inhibited in man. Man inhibited in god. His dreams are his world or at least become his world (a prophet, so to speak). His world IS a dream.


    I love your analysis of Ani and Padme. It's intersting because after reading "The Hero With a Thousand Faces" I learned and realized that Anakin truly is THE Hero of this myth.
    Many may argue that Ani is the Anit-hero, however as Campbell shows over and over in mythology- the hero does not always go on the easy moral path. His road to enlightenment often journeys into the darkest corners of the world and the human soul.

    Here's something interesting from JCampbell that I relate to Anakin:

    They show in the final stages of the adventure the continued operation of the supernatural assisting force that has been attending the elect through the whole course of his ordeal. His consciousness having succumbed, the unconscious nevertheless supplies its own balances, and he is born back into the world from which he came. Instead of holding to and saving his ego, as in the pattern of the magic flight,he loses it, and yet, through grace it is returned.

    It is interesting if you think of this as the Fall of Anakin and his road to redemption. His fall is mostly mental, he gives into the Dark Side of his nature. Yet he also embraces a mystical power that he is attuned to. Consciously he has fully embraced the darkest passages in his mind. However, lurking in the farthest corners of his mind lies the threads of his former self, the young joyous boy who fully embraced and lived for love. Anakin's capacity for love was as equally great as his capacity for hate. This I believe is the main points of EPs 1 &2.

    This brings us to the final crisis of the round, to which the whole miraculous excursion has been but a prelude- that, namely, of the paradoxical, supremely difficult threshold-crossing of the hero's return from the mystic realm into the land of common day. Whether rescued from without, driven from within, or gently carried along by the guiding divinities, he has yet to re-enter with his boon the long-forgotten atmostphere where men who are fractions imagine themselves to be complete. He has yet to confront society with his ego-shattering, life-redeeming elixir, and take the return blow of reasonable queries, hard resentment, and good people at a loss to comprehend.

    Anakin returns because of his love for his son. His son's compassion ignites the love that burned for so long in young Ani's heart. His decision costs him his life. Palpy's Sith lightning destroys his breathing apparatus, giving Anakin only one moment to seek forgiveness before dying. It is the forgiveness of his son that matters most to him. In reality, death is the only natural course for Anakin, for how could he possibly face people in life after what he became? How can he attone for the pain he caused to so many? In life he cannot do so.

    Anakin is humbled by the pure love his son readily gives him and wishes to continue to give him "but I have to save you." For him, Luke's forgiveness is enough. At the end of ROTJ, we see of course that even Yoda and Obi-Wan hold him no ill will.

    The true hero's journey is not always the easiest, purest of roads (such as Lukes) for in many ways the hero must succumb to magic, deception, and pain in order to attain that perfect understanding of redemption. Nevertheless-and here is a great key to the understanding of myth and symbol- the two kingdoms are actually one. The realm of the gods is a forgotten dimension, either willingly or unwillingly, is the whole sense of the deed of the hero. The values
  20. SmoovBillyDee Jedi Padawan

    Member Since:
    Jul 2, 2002
    star 4
    I wish to comment on the fruit that Padme ate, which was mentioned earlier in this thread.

    It is very much a symbol of the "forbidden fruit" of legend. The fact that Padme willingly took of it is important. But even more important, in my mind, is that Anakin was the one to take and give it to her.

    He lifts the fruit from her plate, cuts it and then sends it back to her. He is in control and she is dependant upon him in this relationship. The fact that he cuts it is of note as well. On the surface, it would really make no sense for him to cut it like he did. But, when looking deeper, it is representative of the fact that he is only giving her a portion right now. He keeps part of it for himself.

    The fruit is what led to the downfall of man. Here, it stands for much the same.
  21. PadmeLeiaJaina Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    May 23, 2002
    star 6
    SmoovBillyDee

    He lifts the fruit from her plate, cuts it and then sends it back to her. He is in control and she is dependant upon him in this relationship. The fact that he cuts it is of note as well. On the surface, it would really make no sense for him to cut it like he did. But, when looking deeper, it is representative of the fact that he is only giving her a portion right now. He keeps part of it for himself.

    Excellent analysis. Course flip ahead to them landing on Geonosis and what does Ani say "I've given up trying to argue with you." He's already figured out the ultimate rule #1 for a long lasting relationship- let the woman win :p

    (I know, I know, it doesn't last, it will end tragically...... :_| )

    Pandawan

    I do have my problems with needing to see a scene 10 times to notice the possible eye movements of an actress to indicate something though....I don't fault Lucas for that.

    Yes and unfortunately if NP had made her emotions more obvious, everyone would bash her for overacting and being overly dramatic.

    I have no problem seeing SW films over and over to look for things. Hell I can still watch the OT and find new things -and I've seen those films hundreds of times each. That is why I love SW so much, it evolves with time. The more you learn, the more you can learn to read into the films and find new ways to enjoy them.
  22. Anakin_Skywalker20 Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Nov 16, 2000
    star 5
    lol.. Padme ate Fruit?? :D heh I like the way she ate it...


    It will end... dark...sad... Hold me..please... someone :( Im sad..look at my icon. :( Im mad...and confused...
  23. DarthBreezy Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Jun 4, 2002
    star 6
    Ahh PLJ, in fine form as always...
    DB<<<< Is thinking of how to keep this question relevant to the topic at hand... AH-ha! WE've discussed at leangth the three or four key interactions between A&P (The Dinner, fireplace and confession, both Ani's and Padme's) but what about the eariler, more "innocent" ones? When they are posing as refugees... "Don't worry, we have R2 with us..." I understand compleatly that this truely begins the 'hereo's journey' but what (if any) do you think the "mythic" reasoning behind bringing R2 along (if there is any...) is R2 the 'animal companion' (Artemetis the owl is given to Perseus in some myths) or is it just an excuse to have the droid along (as our "storyteller")? Not ment as a flame... this thread is full of very smart *THINKING* individuals, that's why I've asked here...


    Blatent self promotion... the 2nd to last 2 chapters of my mini epic "Endgames" are up at last and it would tickle me to no end if people would peek see... ;) Link in siggy....
  24. Anakin_Skywalker20 Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Nov 16, 2000
    star 5
    *sniffs sniffs* breezy... :( How..sad..:( *Frowns* Sorry...its the love theme thats making me sad.. :( I like your post though...
  25. naw ibo Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Mar 18, 1999
    star 5
    the hero does not always go on the easy moral path.

    What makes the moral path easy? The moral path is difficult, it's the path of the dark side which is the easy path. Oh sure once you get there it's not so nice and you suffer for it, but what makes it so enticing is the fact that it's easier than the moral path to take. Luke's path was not "the easiest, purest of roads (such as Lukes)", that is the more difficult road to take. That is why it was so inspiring to Anakin to see Luke choose it.
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