" The Ability To Destroy A Planet Is Insignificant To The Power Of The Force "

Discussion in 'Star Wars Saga In-Depth' started by severian28, Jun 6, 2005.

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  1. severian28 Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Apr 1, 2004
    star 5
    How significant is that particular line coming from Vaders' mouth after seeing him stay alive after being horribly maimed in RotS? This is the line I immediately thought after seeing RotS for the first time amd IMO it became the most powerful line of the entire Saga.
  2. All_Powerful_Jedi Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Sep 12, 2003
    star 4
    This scene definitely takes on a new meaning now.

    It's ironic. Anakin is now a phantom of his former self and the power he once had is meaningless. His power has become insignificant to the power of technology and he can only blab on about this "Force" crap and no one listens to him.

    "He's so overwhelming in that first film, but you get to the point where you say, 'Wait a minute, if he's so powerful, why doesn't he run the universe?' He even gets pushed around by the governors! They know the Emperor is the final word, so what happens is the same thing that happens in any corporation: Everybody worries about the top man, they don't worry about his goon. And by the time the Death Star is finished, it gives them the sense they have a bigger, better suit than Darth Vader. In a standoff between the Death Star and Darth Vader, they have no question about who would win, and it's not this mumbo-jumbo Sith guy. So it's even more tragic, because he's not even an all-powerful bad guy, he's kind of a flunky."
    - George Lucas, Rolling Stone, June 2 2005, "The Cult of Darth Vader"
  3. severian28 Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Apr 1, 2004
    star 5
    I was refering to the fact that after watching RotS, I can truly see that " the ability to destroy a planet is insignificant to the power of the force ". It was a line that was cryptic and previously untested. It seems to me, and this is of course only my opinion, that RotS serves to prove this line and this line alone.
  4. All_Powerful_Jedi Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Sep 12, 2003
    star 4
    Thematically, if you take ANH, the line itself has a self-contained depth. After all, it is the Force itself that destroys the Death Star which destroyed a planet. Vader's line is given vindication by that fact.

    I think ROTS takes this line and does the exact opposite with it. This episode is about the loss of faith in the Force. Anakin seeks throughout the movie to discover this power of the Force, but in the end he is given cold mechanics that keep him alive and he never truly discovers that power. On the sandbank, Anakin is scrapping, struggling and this power is nowhere to be found.

    It is technology that ends up being his fake key to "immortality," just as it's the technology of the Imperial War Machine that the Republic turns to and not the Jedi, who are the defenders of the Force.

    The galaxy is drifting away from the Force, the true nature that binds it together, and is embracing materialism to preserve itself.

    Though, of course, there is that glimmer of hope in the end. Unbeknownst to the Sith, it is the Jedi that find the true power of the Force and the secret is kept between them (until Anakin discovers it for himself in the end). They learn the secret to immortaility and gain the ability to avoid oblivion.

    Even as the Death Star is being constructed and the Empire reigns supreme, the Force still binds the galaxy together and there is hope on the horizon.
  5. severian28 Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Apr 1, 2004
    star 5
    Thats true and Ive never really thought of it that way. To me that line from Vader always represented something that differentiates him from his cohorts. Sort of puts him in the know concerning true power, for he has indeed tasted it and seen it first hand. Ive always thought that Vader never really subscribed into the death star personally.
  6. anglachel Jedi Padawan

    Member Since:
    May 3, 2005
    I agree Severian, calling it a "technological toy" pretty much sums up Vader's opinion of the Deathstar.
  7. Church_of_Lucas Jedi Padawan

    Member Since:
    Sep 16, 2004
    It's also a bit ironic, isn't it?

    Vader himself has become a "technological terror" that the Emperor constructed.

  8. BleepsSweepsCreeps Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Nov 11, 2004
    star 1
    It also shows us how much wiser Anakin has become over the years. His younger self from ROTS was cocky, arrogant, and greedy. It seems that by ANH, he had been humbled.

    "When I left you, I was but the learner...now I am the master"

    Vader truly became a master.
  9. DarthSyphus Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    May 26, 2005
    star 1
    Vader wouldn't be alive if it wasn't for technology. It wasn't the Force that kept him alive, but the medical droids and his life support system. One would think that he'd respect technology a little bit more.
  10. severian28 Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Apr 1, 2004
    star 5
    He obviously resents it and perhaps thats the sliver of Anakin that is in him.
  11. Geezasfm Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    May 25, 2005
    star 1
    He resents it because the generals have no respect for the force whatsoever. They call it a "hokey old religion." Anyone who's dealt with the force knows that's untrue. If Sidious himself were there, I'm sure he'd strangle the guy too. From what we know of the films, the force is most likely what makes life possible in the SW galaxy. The force flows through everything, is a part of everything. Of course it's way more powerful than a big laser gun (and in fact, the force flows through even the death star itself.)

    Think of it this way. Presumably in SW, there are thousands of inhabitable planets. Yes, the death star can destroy one of these, and kill all it's inhabitants. But they're spirits will be released back into the force, making it stronger, which will help with the development of new life.

    I don't think Vader means that the force could destroy a larger planet than the death star, he's just saying that the ability of the death star (a big lazer) doesn't even begin to scrape the surface of the powers of the force (everything)

    Even though I'm not a huge fan of the PTs, they only solidify Vader's statement, as was said above.
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