JCC The All-New, All-Different JCC Astronomy Thread

Discussion in 'Community' started by jp-30, Jul 16, 2010.

  1. Lowbacca_1977 Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Jun 28, 2006
    star 6
    I'd say I don't see a benefit to officially deciding that the United States will be withdrawing from the field of astronomy for half a generation.

    Not to mention that it's not that this is a proposed thing being cut, the majority of the telescope has been built already, so scraping it now ignores that we've invested a lot of money already that gets thrown away if we abandon it. It's not as though we have a robust space program that's getting pruned down, we have a battered space program that's seen it's share of funding go from over 5% in the 1960s to a fair bit under 1% now.
  2. jp-30 Manager Emeritus

    Member Since:
    Dec 14, 2000
    star 10
    That's some of the best trivia I've heard in ages.

    Happy Birthday Neptune... orbit... discovery... err.
  3. Healer_Leona Manager Emeritus

    Member Since:
    Jul 7, 2000
    star 9
  4. Ghost Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Oct 13, 2003
    star 6
    Yeah, it is pretty cool.

    What about land-based telescopes?

    Government cancels things we're already invested in all the time, unfortunately. But maybe cancelling the telescope could free up funds for other NASA projects. Or encourage the private sector to step up.

    I think NASA as a whole needs to be reformed, given a new mission. Scientists have for years wondered if we could have space-based solar power... put huge satellites in orbit that collect solar energy, that is then beamed down to Earth using microwave transmissions for use as electricity. Instead of continuing to speculate about it, let's put NASA to work in figuring out how to do it, and get it done within 10-15 years. Then NASA could actually make a small profit, for providing energy needs to the United States and other countries, and with that profit they could fund research-based initiatives like the Webb Space Telescope, missions to explore the Solar System, maybe even get a small base on the Moon and a man on Mars.
  5. Lowbacca_1977 Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Jun 28, 2006
    star 6
    On the first part.... with the current technology, and barring some breakthroughs on AO, the James Webb would be a better telescope than any earth-based telescopes I'm aware of. There's hopes to improve earth-based tech enough for that, but nothing certain to my knowledge.

    On the second part, I'm not sure how one would expect universities to afford the access being suggested there with private sector involvement. Particularly public universities.
  6. VadersLaMent Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Apr 3, 2002
    star 10
    [link=http://www.dailygalaxy.com/my_weblog/2011/07/is-this-the-most-distant-known-object-in-the-observable-universe.html]30 billion lightyears[/link]
  7. Ghost Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Oct 13, 2003
    star 6
    This is pretty cool, a [link=http://lightyears.blogs.cnn.com/2011/07/25/water-in-distant-quasar-could-fill-earths-oceans-100-trillion-times/?hpt=hp_t2]huge mass of water[/link] floating around in outer space has been discovered, 34 billion times the mass of Earth.

    [image=http://i2.cdn.turner.com/cnn/2011/images/07/25/t1larg.quasar.nasa.jpg]
  8. VadersLaMent Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Apr 3, 2002
    star 10
    [link=http://www.space.com/12450-unknown-comet-earth-threat-meteor-shower-evidence.html]A slight worry[/link]
  9. jp-30 Manager Emeritus

    Member Since:
    Dec 14, 2000
    star 10
    You SHUD be sligty worride.
  10. Ghost Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Oct 13, 2003
    star 6
    Apparently there's now the possibility of flowing liquid water on Mars during the planet's springtime...
  11. Lowbacca_1977 Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Jun 28, 2006
    star 6
    I'm so very pleased that I called that news story at work the day before it was announced.
  12. EHT New Films Manager

    Manager
    Member Since:
    Sep 13, 2007
    star 6
    [link=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EIyt5EBUlfM]The Juno mission to Jupiter[/link] launched the other day... set to arrive in five years. Pretty cool.

  13. VadersLaMent Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Apr 3, 2002
    star 10
    5 years to Jupiter? Isn't that like better than any previous mission to Jupiter?

    [link=http://io9.com/5829438/earth-doesnt-need-the-moon]Earth's might not need a big ol' Moon for stability[/link]
  14. VadersLaMent Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Apr 3, 2002
    star 10
    [link=http://www.physorg.com/news/2011-08-planet-diamond-video.html]A planet made of diamond (w/ video)
    [/link]

    "A gem of a story".
  15. VadersLaMent Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Apr 3, 2002
    star 10
    [link=http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/badastronomy/2011/09/12/50-new-worlds-join-the-exoplanet-list/]Astronomers have announced a whole new passel of planets orbiting stars near the Sun: 50 more, the single largest group ever announced at one time*. It?s an indication of just how good we?re getting at finding these things. Even better: many of these planets are at the upper end of what we might call Earth-like.[/link]

    Cool.
  16. DantheJedi Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Aug 23, 2009
    star 5
    I say we fire up the Jupiter 2 and send the Robinson family there!

    (Unless they get lost on the way.....)
  17. VadersLaMent Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Apr 3, 2002
    star 10
    [link=http://www.universetoday.com/90343/nasa-prepares-for-asteroids-close-pass/]On Tuesday, November 8, at 6:28 p.m. EST, an asteroid the size of an aircraft carrier will soar past our planet at a distance closer than the Moon? and NASA scientists will be watching!

    [/link]

    C-type. A big rock.
  18. VadersLaMent Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Apr 3, 2002
    star 10
    [link=http://www.centauri-dreams.org/?p=20498]Big rock go WHOOSH![/link]
  19. VadersLaMent Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Apr 3, 2002
    star 10
    [link=http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-15754786]EUROPA[/link]

    I wonder what the pressure would be like at the bottom of a 100 mile deep ocean on a small world like this.

  20. VadersLaMent Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Apr 3, 2002
    star 10
    [link=http://io9.com/5862652/meet-curiosity--nasas-mars-science-laboratory]Meet Curiosity[/link]

    [image=http://cache.gawkerassets.com/assets/images/8/2011/11/9c1b38d62f0280455dfcc3d6c4233ab9.jpg]

    2,000 pounds on its way to Mars today.

    [image=http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/0/0d/Mars_Science_Laboratory_wheels.jpg/799px-Mars_Science_Laboratory_wheels.jpg]
  21. jp-30 Manager Emeritus

    Member Since:
    Dec 14, 2000
    star 10
    Security camera films meteor!

    http://www.wimp.com/camerameteor/
  22. Everton Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Jul 18, 2003
    star 10
    So erm... what are chances of anything coming from Mars? :p
  23. VadersLaMent Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Apr 3, 2002
    star 10
    [link=http://io9.com/5865107/nasa-confirms-discovery-of-the-most-earth+like-planet-yet]NASA Confirms Discovery of the most Earth-like Planet Yet
    [/link]

    [image=http://cache.gawkerassets.com/assets/images/8/2011/12/f004089fe86d626a133f84299e31ceb4.jpg]

    2.4 times the mass of the Earth. Maybe. Not bad.
  24. VadersLaMent Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Apr 3, 2002
    star 10
    [link=http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/45739417#.TvDcwJg29Hg]2 EARTH SIZED WORLDS FOUND[/link]

    The smaller of the two is stil 1.7 times the mass of the Earth but one of them is actually smaller in size.
  25. Ghost Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Oct 13, 2003
    star 6
    There are probably billions/trillions of Earth-sized worlds in the Milky Way. It's not really news to discover extrasolar planets anymore, unless they're in the habitable zone for liquid water, and not too too far away. :p Even then, we have a few of those now.