Amph The Best Contemporary Science Fiction

Discussion in 'Archive: SF&F: Books and Comics' started by JediTrilobite, Dec 27, 2006.

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  1. JediTrilobite Jedi Master

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    I've been reading SciFi for a long time now, and recently getting back into it after long breaks during college. I've got a list of books that I've been reading and will be, and I wanted to see if we could come up with a list of really good, contemporary science fiction and fantasy authors who've been making waves in the field. This is what I have thus far:

    -Richard K. Morgan, Altered Carbon, Broken Angels
    -Alastair Reynolds, Revelation Space, Chasm City
    -Charles Stross, Singularity Sky, Accelerando, Iron Sunrise
    -Karen Traviss, City of Pearl, Crossing the Line, The World Before and Matriarch
    -Karin Lowachee, Warchild, Burndive, Cagebird

    That's not a complete list of the books that those authors have done, just ones that I can remember off the top of my head, but does anyone have any other authors that should be added to the list?

  2. NYCitygurl Manager Emeritus

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    George R. R. Martin: A Song of Ice and Fire series
    Sara Douglass: The Wayfarer Redemption series
    Robert Jordan: The Wheel of Time series
    Steven Erikson: Gardens of the Moon
    Margaret Weis and Terry Hickman: The Drangonlance books
    Douglas Adams: The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy
    Terry Pratchet: The Discworld books
    Neil Gaimon: American Gods, Anansi Boys


    That's all I can think of at the moment, but those people have all written very famous and popular books.
  3. JediTrilobite Jedi Master

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    Nov 17, 1999
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    Neil Gaiman, certainly, Douglas Adams isn't really what I'd call contemporary any more. Hitchhiker's Guide is now a classic, IMO. Robert Jordan, eh, Terry Pratchett, I have yet to read, but I hear good things.
  4. LAJ_FETT Tech Admin and Collecting/Lucasfilm Ltd Mod

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    I read Pratchett's Hogfather a couple of weeks ago since it was on Sky TV as a Christmas special. I wasn't that crazy about the book but I did like the TV adaptation. That's the only Discworld book I have read, though. (I loved the showing of the Discworld in the TV show!)
  5. Darth-Kevin-Thomas Jedi Master

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    Sep 27, 2002
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    Hmm, this is a tough one. It depends on how far back you want to look. We'll have to wait and see which Authors make it through the test of time. Plus, each person will have there own fav's. Heres what I think.

    Neal Stevenson-Snowcrash, Crytonomicron, Diamond age.
    Neil Gaiman-American Gods, NEverwere
    Robert Jordan-Wheel of Time

    I have to mentin Jordan because I think he's doing a great job with creating this world for people. Also, I'm only on book five so he could be dropped depending how the rest of the storie plays out.

    dkt
  6. FlareStorm Jedi Master

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  7. JediTrilobite Jedi Master

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    Neal Stevenson, he's been recommended to me before.
  8. NYCitygurl Manager Emeritus

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  9. JediNemesis Jedi Padawan

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    Mar 27, 2003
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    Terry Pratchett isn't precisely sci-fi, but he is the funniest, most consistently inventive and one of the most intelligent SFF writers around.

    Alastair Reynolds does pure, hard sci-fi that manages to be wildly inventive and completely realistic at the same time. His hypertechnical language has a tendency to make your brain hurt, but there's nobody better. His best book, IMO, is Chasm City, but the others aren't far behind.
  10. WhiteWolf Jedi Youngling

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    Mar 26, 2006
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    I totally agree with you about Reynolds, and I too think CHASM CITY has been his best so far, although REVELATION SPACE was great. Incidentally, I hear he is publishing a new stand-alone novel set in the Rev Space universe, which is sort of what CHASM CITY could be described as. And I got my grubby little fingers on a copy of CENTURY RAIN, can't wait to read it.

    I don't think CRYPTONOMICON by Neal Stephenson really qualifies as science fiction, but I would love to read SNOW CRASH and his Baroque Cycle books. Sowmewhere down the line I expect that I will.

    Best Contemporary Science Fiction? Has anyone mentioned Orson Scott Card? I think the Ender books should qualify.
  11. JediTrilobite Jedi Master

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    Nov 17, 1999
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    I'd probably count those as classics now, at least Ender's Game. The shadow series isn't nearly as good.

    Another person to add to the list is Allen Steele. He's been around for a little while, but his Coyote series is new, and is outstanding.
  12. WhiteWolf Jedi Youngling

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    Mar 26, 2006
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    I've seen the Coyote books and have been meaning to pick one up. I'll have to put it on my short list.

    And I forgot to mention that I totally agree with you about ALTERED CARBON. That was a great book, and I can't wait to read more Takeshi Kovacs books.
  13. charben01 Jedi Youngling

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    Anything by Jack McDevitt

    Anything by Spider Robinson (especially the Callahan books)
  14. JediTrilobite Jedi Master

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    Coyote is really good. I highly recommend the first one, and the second two aren't too bad either.

    Aparently, there's only three Takeshi Kovacs books, and the one that just came out is the last one.
  15. rebel_cheese Jedi Master

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    Jul 6, 2006
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    Jack McDevitt, without a doubt. Deepsix, Chindi, Omega, and Seeker have all impressed me one way or another. I'm going to read Odyssey sometime too.

    Orson Scott Card is amazing. The Shadow books may lack the same punch as Ender's story, but Shadow Of The Giant made me shed several tears, and it's one of the few books that's made me do that.

    Dean Koontz has mostly abandoned any semblance of the genre but his books 'Phantoms', 'The Taking', 'Midnight', 'By the Light of the Moon', 'Whispers' and 'Strangers' all have elements of sci-fi in them. And I recommend his Odd Thomas books regardless.

    Anne McCaffrey and her Dragonriders of Pern are good, although her collabs with her son haven't impressed me . . . it seems to lose something . . .

    Kevin J. Anderson's Saga of the Seven Suns. He's gotten better at prose fiction since his SW days, and it shows.
  16. JediTrilobite Jedi Master

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    I didn't like KJA's books in that series. Just didn't get me.
  17. WhiteWolf Jedi Youngling

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    Hey Rebel_cheese. You wanna talk Koontz? I'm your guy, trust me.

    I've read it all. And DK is The Man, even though some of his recent books have been a little disappointing (LIFE EXPECTANCY, VELOVCITY, and THE HUSBAND). But I've read them all, and it seems to me that I'm the biggest DK fan in the JC.

    You wanna rap about Koontz? Just let me know.
  18. JediTrilobite Jedi Master

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    Nov 17, 1999
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    Not a big fan of Koonz either. I can't remember which book I tried to read in High School, but I couldn't get into it. Maybe it's time for another try.
  19. Darth-Kevin-Thomas Jedi Master

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    Sep 27, 2002
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    My friend loves koonze and is always trying to get me to red him. I've only read one book but havn't rememberd to pick up any of his recomendations. I just have to much other stuff I want to read.

    Michael Crichton would be good to mention in this thread. He's got a lot of really decent books and his last two were good. Actually, I've yet to read his next one which in fact is titled "next" We'll see how that works out.

    dkt
  20. JediTrilobite Jedi Master

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    Nov 17, 1999
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    Crichton's gone downhill in past years. Prey completely sucked, it was too much of a copy of The Andromeda Strain and Jurassic Park. Literally, there were scenes that were lifted from both, it felt to me. Plus, he's never really described himself as a scifi writer, although his books do fall into that realm. I haven't bothered to pick up Next, nor State of Fear.

    Two other authors that I've picked up recently, Scott Lynch and SM Stirling. Lynch has his first book out, The Lies of Locke Lamora (of which, Mastadge is credited in the acknowledgements), and I've heard some good rumblings about that one.

    Don't know much about Stirling, other than the cover of Sky People looked really cool, and he's got a couple of other pretty well thought of books out at the moment.
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