The Bridge of Khazad-dum- Best Scene in Cinema History: Am I making a bold claim?

Discussion in 'Archive: SF&F: Films and Television' started by Bacon164, Jan 25, 2006.

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  1. TheBoogieMan Manager Emeritus

    Member Since:
    Nov 14, 2001
    star 6
    While it's a fantastic scene, I always thought the Balrog was one of the weakest special effects in the entire trilogy.
  2. Jedi_Master_Conor Manager Emeritus

    Member Since:
    May 24, 2005
    star 6
    it's a great scene. but i wouldn't go as far as to say it's the best scene in cinema history
  3. Drac39 Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Jul 9, 2002
    star 6
    Best scene in cinema history?

    Abosutely not it is one of the best of the recent epics but there is so much cinema to be looked at...
  4. DarthPhelps Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Jan 31, 2002
    star 5
    :eek: I thought it was wonderful, especially considering how they had to address the obscure descriptions of the Balrogs by Tolkien.
  5. severian28 Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Apr 1, 2004
    star 5


    The Balrog scene is the specific part of Tolkiens' book that prompted him to make the impromptu statement that his work could never be made into a live action film, so in that context I think the author of this thread is onto something in suggesting that its at least one of the best film sequences ever, in an ironic kind of way. Id wager a guess that it wouldve certainly made Tolkien proud - although the overall work and they way it marginilized some of the central themes of the text wouldve probably pissed him off. Theres a very specific reason that a dispatch of elves arent sent to Helms Deep and that the Scouring of the Shire was written. Tolkien ends his work in much more of a gray area (no pun intended, although the Prof. may have intended it) and ultimately I believe he was correct - HIS LotR couldnt truly be made into a film, its just sfx wasnt the reason. Some pretty twisted PC that PJ subscribes to is the real reason ( The way the character of Faramir and what he represents is diluted in the theatrical cuts was almost enough for me to disregard the movies altogether ). Ill admit they correct some of it in the EE's, but not enough. I believe its a very flawed masterpiece rendition of a nearly flawless original work. Believe me at the end of the day those movies ( or that movie ) is Peter Jacksons' Lord of the Rings, Ill tell you that much. However this is a totally different subject Im ranting on so Ill digress.
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