main
side
curve
  1. Welcome to the new boards! Details here!

Saga The Foibles and Flaws of the Jedi

Discussion in 'Star Wars Saga In-Depth' started by xezene, Jan 7, 2016.

  1. Alexrd

    Alexrd Force Ghost star 5

    Registered:
    Jul 7, 2009
    A major flaw?! When was it ever a problem to not act on emotions and be compassionate?

    Why should they free Shmi? Why Shmi in particular? Under what jurisdiction?

    He was taught to control his emotions instead of the other way around. That doesn't make someone awkward. In fact, when was Anakin ever awkward?

    Wait... what?!

    That happens when, exactly?

    The Jedi use their weapons as a last resort. That's the Jedi way.

    Choking a person is using the dark side to cause pain and suffering, nothing else.

    What mistakes?

    As in...?

    That's why they encourage love.

    You don't need attachment to love people.

    Your premise that Anakin fell because of the Jedi or their teaching is wrong, since the movies show otherwise.
     
    theraphos and El Jedi Colombiano like this.
  2. Lt. Hija

    Lt. Hija Jedi Master star 4

    Registered:
    Dec 8, 2015
    xezene

    =D==D==D==D==D=

    You wrote one of best Star Wars essays I read in a long time. Wonderful!

    "Luke takes a stand in the end after his realization, and he takes this stand for himself. Like many other groups throughout history, he takes on an old term and applies it to himself in a new setting, making it his own. Luke has, in essence, done a very impressive thing here; he has discovered for himself what it means to be a Jedi. Normally there would be extensive training and this is what brought about stagnancy in the Order, just as in the real world; when it is transmitted so much in an institution, with rules and traditions, it starts to lose its original meaning. People don't connect to the real meaning of it, they don't understand it for themselves; in these movies this is demonstrated as the Jedi losing the connecting with the Living Force."

    Here it is, I just wonder why Joseph Campbell wasn't a bit more straightforward telling is where the Hero's Jorney has to end (too controversial, not palatable for too many of his contemporaries?), i.e. either to abolish an old institution that has become petrified in dogma and rituals or present an alternative or a combination of both.
     
    SavedByChristAlone, Sarge and xezene like this.
  3. ObiWanKnowsMe

    ObiWanKnowsMe Jedi Master star 4

    Registered:
    Sep 7, 2015
    It's NOT a flaw to not act on emotions but it is a flaw not to acknowledge them when teaching younglings. And really? Why wouldnt they free Shmi? She's the mother of Anakin. And really? Youre kidding me! When was Anakin never awkward? What about the very first thing he says to Padme in AOTC??! She laughed it off because it was awkward what he said to her. He couldnt contain his emotions and had to let her know how he felt immediately, at the wrong place in the wrong moment. And about the force choke that Luke uses, it was quick and effective on the Gamorrean Guards, it wasnt torture. It was getting them out of the way without making noise as he was entering. And no they really dont encourage love. And yeah you may not need attachment to love people but it sure does help doesnt it? Loving from afar is not idealistic to people. Attachment is needed even for a Jedi, and Anakin becoming Vader shows that. Oh and mistakes, look at their code and rules against attachment. They cant even have sex, which is natural for beings. Luke was the ultimate Jedi because he could do good without being seduced by the dark side. The Jedi forbid many things because they believed it lead to the dark side. I guarantee you Obi-Wan and Yoda would say that the code was flawed at the end of ROTJ
     
    Iron_lord, Sarge and xezene like this.
  4. anakinfansince1983

    anakinfansince1983 Nightsister of Four Realms star 9 Staff Member Manager

    Registered:
    Mar 4, 2011
    Actually Lucas said that the Jedi are not celibate.
     
  5. Alexrd

    Alexrd Force Ghost star 5

    Registered:
    Jul 7, 2009
    And when were emotions not acknowledged?

    So? The Jedi don't play favorites.

    Have you ever been in love? I guess not.

    That has nothing to do with the Jedi way of life. We've all been on Anakin's shoes at one point of our lives. Well, I guess most of us, apparently.

    Yes, it was torture. It was causing pain and suffering needlessly. He could have used a mind trick, for example. Still, Lucas only made Luke choke the guards to trick the audience. The point was that we didn't know if Luke had fallen to the dark side or not. It's not about Luke doing the right thing.

    Yes, they do. Stated by the very person you think is being affected.

    If you want to be a Jedi, no. It doesn't help at all. On the contrary.

    That's why not everyone is a Jedi. The Jedi dedicate their lives to others, not themselves.

    No, it isn't.

    ?! It shows the opposite. What movies are you talking about?

    What about them?

    Who said they can't have sex? And even if they couldn't, so what? What part of the world selfless do you not understand? Natural doesn't mean mandatory. It's natural for people to form a family, but it's not mandatory nor compatible with the Jedi way of life. If you want to have a family, don't be a Jedi. If you want to dedicate your life to others and serving a cause, become one. It's pretty simple.

    He was seduced by the dark side. He learned from his mistakes. He's not the ultimate Jedi or whatever you want to call it. He's a Jedi. Just that.

    Not because they believe, but because it leads to it.

    No, they wouldn't. The point was to restore what was lost: The Jedi Order.
     
    theraphos likes this.
  6. darth-sinister

    darth-sinister Manager Emeritus star 10 VIP - Former Mod/RSA

    Registered:
    Jun 28, 2001
    ANAKIN: "Attachment is forbidden. Possession is forbidden. Compassion, which I would define as unconditional love, is central to a Jedi’s life, so you might say we’re encouraged to love."


    OBI-WAN: "Anakin, I understand to a degree what is going on. You've met Satine. You know I once harbored feelings for her. It's not that we're not allowed to have these feelings. It's natural."


    "The Jedi are trained to let go. They're trained from birth," he continues, "They're not supposed to form attachments. They can love people- in fact, they should love everybody. They should love their enemies; they should love the Sith. But they can't form attachments. So what all these movies are about is: greed. Greed is a source of pain and suffering for everybody. And the ultimate state of greed is the desire to cheat death."

    --George Lucas, The Making Of Revenge Of The Sith; page 213

    Attachment is defined as possessive love. Compassion is unconditional love. So, yeah, attachment is not necessary. See, most people define attachment as part of love. Which is true, but there is a negative quality to it that can develop which is possessive love. A love that is not really love, but a controlling state of being. A love that is conditional. Anakin wants to keep Padme in his life and places her above everything else. He loves her, but he also loves the idea of her. He becomes jealous of others very easily, as seen with Rush Clovis. He also harbors great fear at losing her, because it will bring an end to an ideal moment in time that he wants to keep frozen.


    "The key part of this scene ultimately is Anakin saying "I'm not going to let this happen again." We're cementing his determination to become the most powerful Jedi. The only way you can really do that is to go to the dark side because the dark side is more powerful. If you want the ultimate power you really have to go to the stronger side which is the dark side, but ultimately it would be your undoing. But it's that need for power and the need for power in order to satisfy your greed to keep things and to not let go of things and to allow the natural course of life to go on, which is that things come and go, and to be able to accept the changes that happen around you and not want to keep moments forever frozen in time."

    --George Lucas, AOTC DVD Commentary.

    That is attachment. Compassion is different. Compassion is love that is unconditional. You ask for nothing. You take nothing. You give freely of yourself. You accept loss with dignity and grace. You think of others ahead of your own needs. Han loves Leia, but he comes to believe that she loves Luke more than him. So after a bit of jealousy and anger on his part, Han comes to the conclusion that he should let her go. Because it is the right thing to do. He will not fight his friends to keep things the way that he wants them to be. Because he does this, he shows great strength of character. He also finds out that he has nothing to worry about and that takes through the end of ROTJ and into TFA.

    Uh, no. He becomes evil because he confuses possessive love with compassionate love. He wants the power to stop his loved ones from dying, which is unnatural. He becomes obsessed with it, which is greed. The shadow of obsession. He is motivated by the fear for his attachments. That fear turns to anger at the thought of losing her and that becomes hate and hate leads to suffering.

    "Jedi Knights aren't celibate - the thing that is forbidden is attachments - and possessive relationships."

    --George Lucas, BBC interview, 2002.

    You really need to re-watch TESB and ROTJ. He is seduced by the dark side which is why he leaves Dagobah and almost gets his ass turned. And then again while fighting Vader at Endor.

    "Part of the going into the tree is learning about the Force. Learning about the fact that the Force is within you, and at the same time, you create your own bad vibes. So, if you think badly about things or you act badly, or you bring fear into a situation, you're going to have to defend yourself or you're going to have to suffer the consequences for that. In this particular case, he takes his sword in with him which means he's going to have combat. If he didn't, he wouldn't. He's creating this situation in his mind because, on a larger level, what caused Darth Vader to become Darth Vader is the same thing that makes Luke bring that sword in with him. And so, just as later on we find out Darth Vader is actually his father - so he is part of himself - but he has the capacity to become Darth Vader simply by using hate and fear and using weapons as oppose to using compassion and caring and kindness. But that's the big danger of the series, is that he will become Darth Vader."

    --George Lucas, TESB DVD Commentary.

    ANAKIN: "I saw my mother. I saw her as clearly as I see you now. She is suffering, Padmé. She is in pain. I know I’m disobeying my mandate to protect you, Senator...but I have to go. I don’t have a choice."


    YODA: "Luke! You must complete the training."

    LUKE: "I can't keep the vision out of my head. They're my friends. I've got to help them."

    YODA: "You must not go!"

    LUKE: "But Han and Leia will die if I don't."

    OBI-WAN: "You don't know that. Even Yoda cannot see their fate."

    LUKE: "But I can help them! I feel the Force!"

    OBI-WAN: "But you cannot control it. This is a dangerous time for you, when you will be tempted by the dark side of the Force."


    "The key issue in these movies is for a Jedi not to use anger when he’s fighting. So the final confrontation here is primarily about trying to make Luke become angry, so that when he fights his father he’s fighting in anger, therefore begins to use the dark side of the Force, and therefore sort of succumbs to the dark side of the Force. In The Empire Strikes Back we had them confront each other and fight together. But in this film Luke has become more mature so that now he knows he shouldn’t be fighting him—that is the path to the dark side. So it’s basically a confrontation between two people and one of them doesn’t want to fight, and the other one keeps trying to push him into it. And then in the end when he gives up and they really do fight, what’s happening there is that ultimately Luke is turning to the dark side, and all is going to be lost."

    --George Lucas, ROTJ DVD Commentary, 2004

    PALPATINE: "Your fleet has lost. And your friends on the Endor moon will not survive. There is no escape, my young apprentice. The Alliance will die...as will your friends. Good. I can feel your anger. I am defenseless. Take your weapon! Strike me down with all your hatred, and your journey towards the dark side will be complete."

    "In the end I had a problem in the fight between Luke and his father of why he makes the final turn--Luke makes the final turn to the bad side of the force and tries to kill his father. Richard [Marquand] was trying to block out the fight between Luke and Vader and we got down to that point underneath the throne room there and he said, 'You know the script sort of says that Vader says something that upsets Luke,' or something vague like that. I can't remember exactly what the script said but it was a very vague...spark. And we didn't have that actual moment that we needed where you got the sense that Luke is hiding. He's not going to fight him. He refuses to fight. He'd rather die first and then something turns him around and makes him fight. And I never really came up with a satisfactory answer to that of what he could possibly say to set Luke off. And in the process of evolving the script and evolving the importance of Leia as the sister, it was sitting right there in front of my face and it became obvious that turning her to the dark side would be the thing that would set Luke off again."

    --George Lucas, ROTJ Annotated Screenplay; 1999


    VADER: "Give yourself to the dark side. It is the only way you can save your friends. Yes, your thoughts betray you. Your feelings for them are strong. Especially for...Sister! So...you have a twin sister. Your feelings have now betrayed her, too. Obi-Wan was wise to hide her from me. Now his failure is complete. If you will not turn to the dark side, then perhaps she will."

    Luke was very much tempted. You can see it in his face.

    [​IMG]

    He just understood what was on the other side of the door. The same with Obi-wan after losing to Maul.

    [​IMG]
     
    theraphos and Iron_lord like this.
  7. Darth Dnej

    Darth Dnej Jedi Master star 4

    Registered:
    Apr 27, 2013
    To me the biggest folly of the Jedi is that they cloister themselves away too much. People have to appeal to the corrupt senate to even get to the Jedi. The Jedi should have more enclaves throughout the galaxy where locals can directly appeal to them.
     
    wobbits, xezene and Sarge like this.
  8. darth-sinister

    darth-sinister Manager Emeritus star 10 VIP - Former Mod/RSA

    Registered:
    Jun 28, 2001
    The Jedi cannot go out and do things on their own. They need permission from the Senate to get involved. So it isn't a matter of cloistering themselves at all. But how things were. And people could come to the Temple to visit the Jedi Council. It was never closed to the public unless there was a lock down.
     
  9. strannik1

    strannik1 Jedi Youngling

    Registered:
    Dec 18, 2015
    Some of these issues result from a dime store philosophy stretched to its limits and massive continuity problems.

    I always compare Jedis to monks that I know (Taoist and Orthodox). That has made some Jedi ideas very realistic, while also revealing the 2 dimensional character of some of the other ideas. Pride, Anger, Attachments, etc, *really can* lead someone to a dark side, or at least delusion (which I also see the dark side as being).

    What is it with the Skywalkers and their constant whining, though?


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
     
  10. TheGreyWalker

    TheGreyWalker Jedi Youngling

    Registered:
    Feb 1, 2016
    They're not forbidden to love. They're encouraged to love, but compassionately. Not selfishly. They're taught to let go of their fears, instead of embracing them.[/quote]

    No, it is against the Code to foster romantic relationships, but I agree with the fact that they are taught to let go of fear, but aren't these rules almost impossible to follow as an emotional human being?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  11. anakinfansince1983

    anakinfansince1983 Nightsister of Four Realms star 9 Staff Member Manager

    Registered:
    Mar 4, 2011
    If by "emotional human being" you mean "human being who makes decisions primarily by emotion," it is possible to train oneself not to be that way.

    If you mean "human being who has emotions," meaning everyone, then no, it is not impossible to train oneself to let go of fear.
     
    theraphos likes this.
  12. TheGreyWalker

    TheGreyWalker Jedi Youngling

    Registered:
    Feb 1, 2016
    I primarily meant "human being who makes decisions primarily by emotion". Especially in the case of Anakin, who was vulnerable to emotion from the start.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  13. anakinfansince1983

    anakinfansince1983 Nightsister of Four Realms star 9 Staff Member Manager

    Registered:
    Mar 4, 2011
    Anakin, like most people, was at his best when he was NOT using his emotions in his decision-making. Examples that come to mind from the films and TCW series are when he was piloting a fighter/flying a speeder, leading a battle, fighting an enemy that he did not have a personal vendetta against, talking through issues with Obi-Wan when he (Anakin) was calm.

    He was vulnerable to emotion, yes, and his biggest issue was that he often felt he had the right to act on every emotion he had. Palpatine telling him that his feelings made him special did not help. Feelings do not make anyone special, but as Anakin demonstrated, they make people easy to exploit.
     
  14. Lazy_Ewok

    Lazy_Ewok Jedi Youngling star 1

    Registered:
    Aug 21, 2016
    Yeah using compassion and logic is better when making decisions rather than emotions and lack of facts. Anakin did better decisions when he wasn't over-powered by emotions.
     
  15. Merry dog

    Merry dog Jedi Youngling

    Registered:
    Feb 9, 2018
     
  16. Merry dog

    Merry dog Jedi Youngling

    Registered:
    Feb 9, 2018
    The jefi are detached because the first line of the Jedi code is there is no emotion there is peace which is negative reductive dehumanizing bull****. Being human means feeling emotions if you can't feel emotions you may as well be a robot. Yes the Jedi do chide aniken because this 9 year old kid Is publicly shamed and criticized because he misses his mother which is completely natural and healthy. Basically what the Jedi are telling aniken is how dare you love your mother which is in no way wise. And all Jedi are not allowed to have a relationship with their biological family which is completely wrong because it is completely natural and healthy to love your family. Yes the Jedi do say feelings are wrong because the first line of the Jedi code is there is no emotion there is peace, they prevent Jedi from having a relationship with their biological family, forbid their members from loving even though love is a natural and healthy human emotion. On top of that the Jedi act like emotions such as fear are a gateway drug to the dark side when in reality fear is not an inherently bad thing. I can't believe you guys support the fact that the Jedi don't lift a finger to help slaves suffering on planets like tattoine.
     
  17. Alexrd

    Alexrd Force Ghost star 5

    Registered:
    Jul 7, 2009
    No. The Jedi do not act on attachment for various reasons. It's possessive, selective, it can be exploited and used against them, and it clouds one's judgement. It's simply incompatible with a selfless way of life, which is the Jedi way. That alleged Jedi code is not part of the movies.

    ?! You can feel emotion. Who said you can't? How exactly do you not feel emotions? What you can't do, as a Jedi, is act on emotion. You control them and let go.

    They didn't chide anyone. Nobody shamed or criticized Anakin for missing his mother. He was the one who asked the relevancy of his fear of losing his mother, and the Jedi answered in a very calm and dispassionate way. The opposite of what you're alleging they did.

    No, they didn't. That's objectively false.

    First, nobody forces you to be a Jedi. Second, the Jedi are selfless, they don't play favorites. Their families are not more important that everyone else's. They are equally compassionate to all. That's their philosophy, and if you want to be a Jedi it's expect of you to accept that premise. If you don't, you're free to leave. No Jedi ever said that not being a Jedi is unhealthy or unnatural. Not sure where you're getting that idea. What's natural is not inherently good. Irrationality is natural. Evil is natural.

    Of course it is a bad thing to act on fear. It's proven time and time again throughout the movies.

    No, we simply don't pretend it's their responsibility to free slaves outside of (and more importantly, at the expense of) their jurisdiction.
     
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2018
  18. Merry dog

    Merry dog Jedi Youngling

    Registered:
    Feb 9, 2018
    First off the simple fact is that for the Jedi to say in their code it's members can't feel emotions is wrong because feeling emotion is natural and healthy. Let me ask you a question if the Jedi didn't publicly shame and critisize aniken for missing his mother then why is it they never free her even though they easily could have if they wanted to. The reason is that the Jedi act like it is unnatural and unhealthy that aniken loves and misses his mother when it is unterstandle and completely normal. "Their families aren't more important than anyone else's" so you guys really feel it is right for the Jedi to not allow their members to have a relationship with their biological family when it is completely healthy to love your family. Not only that but the Jedi don't allow people to voluntarily decide to join the order instead they indoctrinate people when they are infants. I know the Jedi didn't directly say aniken how dare you love your mother but through the words they told him in the phantom menace that is the message they were sending.
     
  19. Bazinga'd

    Bazinga'd The Man / Also Known as Bazinga'd star 6 Staff Member Manager

    Registered:
    Nov 1, 2012
    You have to ask the question as this is the Saga forum? :p
     
    anakinfansince1983 likes this.
  20. Merry dog

    Merry dog Jedi Youngling

    Registered:
    Feb 9, 2018
    When aniken is brought before the Jedi in the phantom menace if the Jedi had any form of warmth or compassion the conversation would have gone like this aniken: I miss her Yoda: clearly you live your mother and leaving her was very painful aniken:yes it was mace windu: that is why we will send Jedi to free your mother and bring her here. The difference is in that scenario the Jedi acknowledge and validate aniken feelings of grief and pain. But instead aniken doesn't get any emotional support.
     
    Iron_lord likes this.
  21. Iron_lord

    Iron_lord Force Ghost star 9

    Registered:
    Sep 2, 2012
    Didn't sound that "calm and dispassionate". If anything, Yoda was hamming it up:

    "Everything! Fear leads to anger, anger leads to hate, hate leads ... to suffering!"

    Keep in mind that Anakin was present for the "He will not be trained - there is too much fear/anger in him" conversation between Qui-Gon and the Council.
     
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2018
  22. Alexrd

    Alexrd Force Ghost star 5

    Registered:
    Jul 7, 2009
    He was emphasising. Still in a calm and dispassionate manner.

    Watch the scene. He was never shamed nor criticized. Stating that he was not to become a Jedi for being to old is not being shamed. It's a mere statement. Just like them sensing much fear in him. It's a statement of fact. He knows he has much fear in him. And Yoda is letting him know that they sense it too and as he explained, that's a problem for a potential Jedi.
     
    theraphos and Valairy Scot like this.
  23. Iron_lord

    Iron_lord Force Ghost star 9

    Registered:
    Sep 2, 2012
    Anakin is nine.

    The logical consequence of him hearing their criticisms of him for "missing his mother" and "too much anger in him" is shame - a feeling that he's not good enough for them.

    After they rescind their rejection - he will still have reason to believe that certain emotions are things to be ashamed of - and spend the next ten years repressing them instead of controlling them.
     
  24. darth-sinister

    darth-sinister Manager Emeritus star 10 VIP - Former Mod/RSA

    Registered:
    Jun 28, 2001
    The Code doesn't say that feeling emotions is wrong. The Code forbids Jedi from feeling fear, anger and hate as they will lead to suffering.

    YODA: "Run! Yes. A Jedi's strength flows from the Force. But beware of the dark side. Anger...fear...aggression. The dark side of the Force are they. Easily they flow, quick to join you in a fight. If once you start down the dark path, forever will it dominate your destiny, consume you it will, as it did Obi-Wan's apprentice."

    A Jedi must acknowledge their fears and let go of them, in order to be a whole and complete person. When Anakin is asked how he feels, he replies that he feels cold. But as we also learned in TESB and in "Rebels", feeling cold is part of the dark side.

    LUKE: "There's something not right here. I feel cold. Death."

    YODA: "That place...strong with the dark side of the Force. A domain of evil it is."


    EZRA: "There's something familiar. I feel cold. I think I know who it is. Back on Lothal I felt something. Kanan did too. The fear. The anger. The hate. It's the Sith Lord we faced."

    They sense his fear for his mother and thus his attachment to her. Yoda explains to him that his thoughts about his mother are fear based and that fear will lead to the dark side. As Yoda told Ezra, it is a life long struggle for a Jedi to not let fear become anger and hate. A Jedi can feel love and compassion towards others, but they cannot have families because they can be swayed towards the dark side due to the fear of loss towards their loved ones.

    "This is obviously a very pivotal scene for Anakin because this is reuniting with his mother and his youth and at the same time dealing with his inability to let go of his emotions and allow himself to accept the inevitable. The fact that everything must change and that things come and go through his life and that he can't hold onto things which is a basic Jedi philosophy that he isn't willing to accept emotionally and the reason that is because he was raised by his mother rather than the Jedi. If he'd have been taken in his first year and started to study to be a Jedi, he wouldn't have this particular connection as strong as it is and he'd have been trained to love people but not to become attached to them. But he has become attached to his mother and he will become attached to Padme and these things are, for a Jedi, who needs to have a clear mind and not be influenced by threats to their attachments, a dangerous situation. And it feeds into fear of losing things, which feeds into greed, wanting to keep things, wanting to keep his possessions and things that he should be letting go of. His fear of losing her turns to anger at losing her, which ultimately turns to revenge in wiping out the village. The scene with the Tusken Raiders is the first scene that ultimately takes him on the road to the Dark Side. I mean he's been prepping for this, but that's the one where he's sort of doing something that is completely inappropriate."

    --George Lucas, AOTC DVD Commentary.

    "The scene in the garage here, we begin to see that what he's really upset about is the fact that he's not powerful enough. That if he had more power, he could've kept his mother. He could've saved her and she could've been in his life. That relationship could've stayed there if he'd have been just powerful enough. He's greedy in that he wants to keep his mother around, he's greedy in that he wants to become more powerful in order to control things in order to keep the things around that he wants. There's a lot of connections here with the beginning of him sliding into the dark side. And it also shows his jealousy and anger at Obi-Wan and blaming everyone else for his inability to be as powerful as he wants to be, which he hears that he will be, so here he sort of lays out his ambition and you'll see later on his ambition and his dialogue here is the same as Dooku's. He says "I will become more powerful than every Jedi." And you'll hear later on Dooku will say "I have become more powerful than any Jedi." So you're going start to see everybody saying the same thing. And Dooku is kind of the fallen Jedi who was converted to the dark side because the other Sith Lord didn't have time to start from scratch, and so we can see that that's where this is going to lead which is that it is possible for a Jedi to be converted. It is possible for a Jedi to want to become more powerful, and control things. Because of that, and because he was unwilling to let go of his mother, because he was so attached to her, he committed this terrible revenge on the Tusken Raiders."

    --George Lucas, AOTC DVD Commentary.

    "The key part of this scene ultimately is Anakin saying "I'm not going to let this happen again." We're cementing his determination to become the most powerful Jedi. The only way you can really do that is to go to the dark side because the dark side is more powerful. If you want the ultimate power you really have to go to the stronger side which is the dark side, but ultimately it would be your undoing. But it's that need for power and the need for power in order to satisfy your greed to keep things and to not let go of things and to allow the natural course of life to go on, which is that things come and go, and to be able to accept the changes that happen around you and not want to keep moments forever frozen in time."

    --George Lucas, AOTC DVD Commentary.

    "The Jedi are trained to let go. They're trained from birth," he continues, "They're not supposed to form attachments. They can love people- in fact, they should love everybody. They should love their enemies; they should love the Sith. But they can't form attachments. So what all these movies are about is: greed. Greed is a source of pain and suffering for everybody. And the ultimate state of greed is the desire to cheat death."

    --George Lucas, The Making Of Revenge Of The Sith; page 213.

    "It's about a good boy who was loving and had exceptional powers, but how that eventually corrupted him and how he confused possessive love with compassionate love. That happens in Episode II: Regardless of how his mother died, Jedis are not supposed to take vengeance. And that's why they say he was too old to be a Jedi, because he made his emotional connections. His undoing is that he loveth too much."

    --George Lucas, Rolling Stone Magazine Interview; June 2005.
     
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2018
    theraphos and Alexrd like this.
  25. Alexrd

    Alexrd Force Ghost star 5

    Registered:
    Jul 7, 2009
    A fact nobody argued.

    There was no criticism. Anakin asked what was the relevancy of his fear of loss and Yoda answered.

    Shame?! Again, who said anything about shame? The Jedi warned about the consequences of fear of loss and attachment. That's knowledge and wisdom, not shaming. They didn't shame anyone nor do they said he should repress anything. The Jedi teach to control and let go of fear and attachment, not to repress. But to acknowledge it and let go.
     
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2018
    theraphos, FARK2005 and Valairy Scot like this.