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Saga The Foibles and Flaws of the Jedi

Discussion in 'Star Wars Saga In-Depth' started by xezene, Jan 7, 2016.

  1. Iron_lord

    Iron_lord Chosen One star 10

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    Sep 2, 2012
    They may not all be the same - but taking things personally, and feeling shame, is a predictable consequence of "stating facts" when those facts are extremely negative ones.

    Stating "you are too fat to do X" would, predictably, result in the person feeling ashamed of their body -

    so, when somebody says "All I was doing was stating facts - I wasn't body-shaming them", I think they're just fooling themselves.

    Similarly, stating, in effect, "You have too much fear (for your mother) to join the Jedi Order" could reasonably be predicted to result in Anakin being ashamed of himself for having this fear.

    Which is why Anakin tries to deny having it "I am not afraid".
     
    Last edited: Mar 6, 2018
  2. Martoto77

    Martoto77 Jedi Master star 5

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    Aug 6, 2016
    If you tell someone they are angry etc and you treat them like they are angry etc . Chances are they will soon turn angry etc
     
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  3. Iron_lord

    Iron_lord Chosen One star 10

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    The argument seems to be that because they didn't say it "onscreen" - only in the novelizations and early versions of the script - they never used the phrase "too much anger in him" to Anakin's face.
     
    Last edited: Mar 6, 2018
  4. Martoto77

    Martoto77 Jedi Master star 5

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    Aug 6, 2016
    Obi-Wan has at least learned the lesson by the time of ESB.

    Yoda - "Much anger in him. Like his father."

    Obi-Wan - "Was I any different when you taught me?" i.e. "You always say that! Give it a rest. I suppose you had no anger in you when you began studying? Well. If, so. How could you know what having anger feels like or whether or not someone should be rejected and not trained on that basis?" I am paraphrasing, of course. ;)
     
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  5. Kenneth Morgan

    Kenneth Morgan Chosen One star 5

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    May 27, 1999
    Are we talking about negative emotions, or emotions in general? Emotions can be a positive factor, as well. Love has motivated a great many people to accomplish tremendous feats. Happiness has defused a lot of problems, and helped others through trouble. Emotions, if they're properly controlled, are a great asset. If the Jedi Code had become a blanket statement against emotions in general, then they'd really lost touch with the people they'd sworn to protect and help.
     
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  6. Iron_lord

    Iron_lord Chosen One star 10

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    Sep 2, 2012
    Apparently the Jedi are allowed love, but only if it's compassionate love - the kind of love that felt equally for every stranger in the galaxy.
     
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  7. Martoto77

    Martoto77 Jedi Master star 5

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    Aug 6, 2016
    What if you get too attached to your love for every stranger in the Galaxy? Must one train oneself to let go of that love in case some other galaxy blackmails you into killing more galaxies for it? ;)
     
    Last edited: Mar 6, 2018
  8. Kenneth Morgan

    Kenneth Morgan Chosen One star 5

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    May 27, 1999
    When you apply this to the situation with Shmi, this presents a problem. Apparently, it's OK for Ani to love his mother, but he can't ever see her because it would constitute an attachment. Any other Jedi may feel compassion for her and her situation, but they can't ever help her because it would be playing favorites. And, if you extend that to Padme, the Jedi express their compassion for her by telling Ani to let her go and forget her, and to not do anything on their own to help her.

    Personally, I think the Jedi had, to a large extent, become motivated by fear. They were so afraid of any of their number being influenced by the Dark Side, they worked to eliminate anything that might possibly lead to it, like family and love on a personal level, both good and honorable things. And they express disapproval of any Jedi who shows signs of experiencing these, no matter the motivation. It even reaches the point to where, due to fear for the Republic and themselves, they abandoned their jobs as keepers of the peace in favor of becoming soldiers, and even plotted to illegally seize control of the government. This put them in a perfect position to get taken out by Palpatine.

    Basically, their efforts to resist the Dark Side left them vulnerable to those who followed the Dark Side.
     
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  9. darth-sinister

    darth-sinister Manager Emeritus star 10 VIP - Former Mod/RSA

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    It's always negative emotions. That's why the Jedi never say anything about positive emotions being bad. The Jedi teach their own to love, but it has to be an unconditional love. Compassion. Selflessness. The Jedi are capable of feeling happy, which we see when Obi-wan and Anakin react to seeing Jar Jar and Obi-wan's pleasure at seeing Dex again, even going so far as to hug. The Force is, as I've said many times, fueled by emotions. Negative emotions.

    PALPATINE: "I can feel your anger. It gives you focus. Makes you stronger."

    PALPATINE: "Your hate has made you powerful."

    PALPATINE: "Good. Use your aggressive feelings, boy! Let the hate flow through you."

    That doesn't happen. Compassionate love is where you don't think of yourself. Where you don't ask for anything in return and care about the well being of others. Selfish love is where you care only for yourself and where you focus your desires on a single object of desire. Anakin focuses his desires on Padme, because to him she is his whole world and if she is not in his world, then the whole universe can go to hell. He was willing to let everyone suffer if it meant Padme is in his life.

    Anakin was never told that he couldn't see his mother. He was never told that it was about playing favorites or not. That's a supposition that was made by fans. The fact is that his mother was still a slave and Qui-gon couldn't free her, because he didn't have the money to and then died shortly afterwards. The Council, Palpatine and Padme never bothered to do more. Whether your agree or disagree, they didn't. But he never held it against them until much later. Much later. Anakin himself believed that he and Shmi would see each other again, and because foresaw himself coming back as a Jedi, he believed that.

    As to Padme, the only thing Yoda tells Anakin is to train himself to let go of his fears. He never told him to forget her and he didn't tell him to not do anything to help her. The fact is that because he dwelled the negative, he drove himself into a frenzy and sought out unnatural means of trying to save her. That wasn't Yoda's fault. That was his fault for believing that the Force could save her, which was why he went to Yoda in the first place. He wanted what Palpatine told him existed, which was the power to control life and death.
     
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  10. Kenneth Morgan

    Kenneth Morgan Chosen One star 5

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    May 27, 1999
    If Ani was never told he couldn't see his mother, why didn't he? Why didn't he and Kenobi go and visit her at some point? Why didn't Kenobi or any other Jedi check on how she was doing? Why did Kenobi fall back on, "Ignore them; they're just dreams" when Ani had possibly prophetic dreams about Shmi? Seems to me everything seems to point to, "No contact; too dangerous; move along." It's true that Palpatine and Padme didn't do anything, either, but I'm sure they'd have at least offered some sympathy (false as Palpatine's would've been). We have to ask if the Jedi did. Did they at least say, "I'm sorry about your mother; my condolences," or did they fall back on, "She's gone; deal with it." Kenobi might've been sympathetic, but Yoda? Mace? I'm not certain.

    As for Padme, "Mourn them not, miss them not" seems pretty clear. Not "Let go of your fears", but "Let go of her, forever". At best, Yoda gave some good advice in the worst possible way, a way easily misinterpreted. And he gave no other advice, not even, "You're too close to this; get someone else's help. How about I pass this along?" If Yoda was anywhere near as perceptive as he's supposed to be, he'd have sensed that his words weren't having the right effect and added additional, better-worded advice. And he should've asked the basic question anyone else would've asked, "Who are we talking about, Ani?"

    They seem so focused on the big picture and the organizing Force and the stability of the Order that they lose sight of what average individuals feel, think, fear and love.
     
    Last edited: Mar 6, 2018
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  11. CLee

    CLee Jedi Padawan star 1

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    Jun 18, 2017
    Their love for the Republic actually seems more like selective attachment to it-enough to be willing to lead a war against systems and individuals wanting to and trying to leave it.
     
    Last edited: Mar 6, 2018
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  12. Martoto77

    Martoto77 Jedi Master star 5

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    Says who? Only you, because it's inconvenient to supposed universality of the the inferred rules.

    If a Jedi loves the entire galaxy and the entire galaxy comes under threat, then the Jedi must be prepared to lose the entire galaxy rather than disobey the Jedi code in order to protect it.

    A bigger problem is that it's actually only within the Republic that the Jedi have to have love for everyone without any return. The slaves on Tatooine? They're sith out of luck, unless they are potentially super powerful force user and there is something to gain for the Jedi order and therefore the republic by buying him. Everyone else can dangle for the Hutts.
     
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2018
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  13. BLemelisk

    BLemelisk Jedi Master star 4

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    Aug 19, 2003
    The Jedi in the prequel era were also aware of their times. Showing up on Tatooine and trying to dismantle the criminal enterprises controlling it might have resulted in dire straits for the Republic.

    It's not a secret that they exist to serve the greater good, and they had thrown their lot in with the Republic in order to do the most good for the most amount of people.
     
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2018
  14. Martoto77

    Martoto77 Jedi Master star 5

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    Aug 6, 2016
    I don't recall that being conveyed in any of the PT films but, considering the knots they tie themselves in getting involved in the Naboo blockade and telling everyone that they can't/shan't/don't get involved in these kinds of disputes within the Republic. So it would make sense, I guess.
     
  15. Samuel Vimes

    Samuel Vimes Jedi Master star 4

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    Sep 4, 2012
    A thing about compassion,
    I hear people say that the Jedi should be like this.
    But the same people also turn around and argue against the Jedi SHOWING compassion.
    Help Shmi? No they can't do that because rules, the code and jurisdiction.
    Help the people dying on Naboo?
    Two Jedi is enough and they went in part because they though Maul would be there.
    Had Padme not gone back, the Jedi would not have bothered.

    And speaking about that, how about appearing as witnesses to help Padme?
    No, apparently rules again and Valorum sending them was illegal so they can't do anything.

    In all, a Jedi can apparently only show compassion when the code, dogma or rules allow it.
    The rest of the time, sorry.
    Doing good is less important than following the rules.

    Also "sadness", is that ok for a Jedi?
    "Miss them do not, mourn them do not."
    Is a Jedi allowed to feel sad?

    About emotions, like with many human things, they can be both a positive and a negative.
    They can make us aspire to greatness or drags us down to the depth.
    I feel that the Jedi were so afraid of the negative side of emotions that they tried to limit them overall.

    In closing, my overall biggest issue with the PT Jedi isn't a flaw with them as such but I found many of them quite dull.
    They weren't interesting to watch, I was not all that engaged with them and they seemed to not care that much about what was going on and thus I didn't much care about them.

    Bye for now.
    Blackboard Monitor
     
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  16. darth-sinister

    darth-sinister Manager Emeritus star 10 VIP - Former Mod/RSA

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    Anakin had his Jedi training and his Jedi duties to keep him busy. It's the same reason that he doesn't see Padme for ten years. Same with Obi-wan never meeting Dooku until Geonosis. Jedi rarely had too much downtime to go off on jaunts like that.

    Because neither one of them were aware that what Anakin was seeing were visions of the future. That's why Obi-wan says that they're dreams and Anakin doesn't seem concerned until his last vision on Naboo, where he can see Shmi as clearly as he can see Padme standing in front of him.

    Obi-wan would have expressed his sympathies and condolences. Yoda probably did as well since he had felt Anakin's pain all the way on Coruscant.

    Yoda states it very clearly to Anakin.

    YODA: "Train yourself to let go of everything you fear to lose."

    He never says or hints that it means, "Let go of her, forever." When he tells him to not mourn her, he's talking about what Anakin does, which is bury her six feet under before she's dead. He convinces himself that she will die if he does nothing and that is because he spends every day living in fear, until she actually dies. He lets his fears control his actions. As Lucas put it, Anakin is afraid to be alone and he cannot accept that people will leave him. He is unwilling to accept death as a natural part of life. He is afraid of death.

    "The key part of this scene ultimately is Anakin saying "I'm not going to let this happen again." We're cementing his determination to become the most powerful Jedi. The only way you can really do that is to go to the dark side because the dark side is more powerful. If you want the ultimate power you really have to go to the stronger side which is the dark side, but ultimately it would be your undoing. But it's that need for power and the need for power in order to satisfy your greed to keep things and to not let go of things and to allow the natural course of life to go on, which is that things come and go, and to be able to accept the changes that happen around you and not want to keep moments forever frozen in time."

    --George Lucas, AOTC DVD Commentary.


    "When you get down to where we are right now in the story, you basically get somebody who’s going to make a pact with the Devil, and it’s going to be a pact with the Devil that says, 'I want the power to save somebody from death. I want to be able to stop them from going to the river Styx, and I need to go to a god for that, but the gods won’t do it, so I’m going to go down to Hades and get the Dark Lord to allow me to have this power that will allow me to save the very person I want to hang on to.' You know, it’s Faust. So Anakin wants that power, and that is basically a bad thing. If you’re going to sell your soul to save somebody you love, that’s not a good thing. That’s as we say in the film, unnatural. You have to accept that natural course of life. Of all things. Death is obviously the biggest of them all. Not only death for yourself, but death for the things you care about."

    --George Lucas, “Star Wars: The Last Battle,” Vanity Fair, 2005.

    It is an internal battle that he must struggle with and there is no other way through than to do it on his own. He has to make the conscious choice to let go of his fears and it can only come through his training. Obi-wan gave him the tools to banish his fears, but he chooses to seek out power.

    The Jedi are trying to protect as many lives as possible, in the hopes of restoring the peace. The Jedi weren't fighting so much because the Separatists wanted to leave, but because of the danger in the war breaking out, which would affect civilians. Not to mention that the Sith were involved which puts them on the front lines, because they're trying to prevent the Sith from taking control again.

    The Jedi are willing to accept losing the Republic, which is why the survivors go into hiding. But during the war, the Jedi have to fight to protect the Republic from the Sith. The problem is what Yoda points out to Ezra after the war has long ended.

    YODA: "Padawan, thousands of Jedi once there were. Then came war. In our arrogance, join the conflict swiftly we did. Fear, anger, hate. Consumed by the dark side the Jedi were."

    EZRA: "Was it wrong for the Jedi to fight? Is it wrong for me to protect my friends?"

    YODA: "Wrong? Hmm. A long time, fought I did. Consumed by fear I was, though see it I did not."

    EZRA: "You were afraid?"

    YODA: "Yes, afraid. Hmm, surprised are you? A challenge lifelong it is, not to bend fear into anger."


    EZRA: "Yeah, but Master Yoda, how are we supposed to win if we don't fight back?"

    YODA: "Win? Win, hmm. How Jedi choose to win, the question is."

    It isn't that the Jedi could not fight or win a fight, but it was how they approached the fight that mattered. The way the Jedi won the last fight was by turning the Sith against each other, so that they would destroy each other and whoever was left, was dealt with by the surviving Jedi. This time, though, the Jedi chose to fight because they were behind the eight ball with their powers failing them and they chose to fight a war that they knew that they shouldn't have fought in, but thought that they could win by going to Geonosis when they did. The Sith used the fact that the Jedi were compassionate towards everyone and that compassion, which was a weakness, would be their undoing. The Jedi couldn't sit back and do nothing, because that went against the Code. But fighting in the war also took them to a dark place. It was a catch-22 situation. The analogy that Lucas was going for was how black and white wars like World War I and II appeared to be, but latter wars like Vietnam were fought for reasons that were muddled and didn't make a lot of sense when scrutinized.

    The problem wasn't the Jedi failed to act, the problem was the Republic let the Outer Rim fall out of their purview due to indifference and thus places like Tatooine came under the control of the Hutts. The Republic lost sight of how important everyone was and in turn, the whole thing broke down.
     
  17. Kenneth Morgan

    Kenneth Morgan Chosen One star 5

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    May 27, 1999
    First, I wouldn't clarify checking on Shmi as a "jaunt". She helped them, and allowed her son to join them. It would be natural compassion to make sure she's OK and let her know her son is fine. Even a simple comm call would be sufficient. Instead, the impression we get is that she's no longer a part of Ani's life and he must let go of her forever.

    Next, Ani had several reams about Shmi before the last one on Naboo. Since foresight and prophetic visions are a recognized, and even crucial, trait of the Jedi, I'd say this is something that warrants investigation. Ignoring it is a hindrance to Ani's training, since it affects his peace of mind.

    Next, so Yoda focuses everything on Ani letting go, but nothing on actually helping someone? It's all "Let go of your fears" and no "Now, here's how you can help her without risking yourself." And Ani is desperately asking for some guidance on how to help, and is told she's already gone and he should do nothing. And, again, Yoda should've recognized that his advice was not helping matters. Yes, Ani needs to recognize his limitations and accept that people die, but it isn't necessary to let Padme die to achieve that.
     
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  18. darth-sinister

    darth-sinister Manager Emeritus star 10 VIP - Former Mod/RSA

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    I'm pretty sure there isn't a friends and family plan on Tatooine, to reach out and touch someone. As to going in person, again, I pointed out that the life of a Jedi is very busy. It didn't allow much time for recreation. Hell, Obi-wan only see Dex for business. Not pleasure.

    Jedi can have dreams that are not prophetic visions. All that they know is that Anakin is dreaming of her. He doesn't know what it is he is seeing and Obi-wan doesn't believe it to be anything serious. If he did, he would have taken action.

    The point is that when Anakin stops feeling fear, he will know what to do. He will know the good and the bad, once he has achieved this. The solution will present itself. And if she is to die in child birth, then there's nothing that can be done to stop it. There's a world of difference between stopping someone from dying, if it is possible to prevent it and stopping the natural course of life which is that people die. Anakin confuses the two and lumps it all together under the notion that he can stop everyone from dying.
     
  19. Kenneth Morgan

    Kenneth Morgan Chosen One star 5

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    May 27, 1999
    So, the Jedi policy is when someone you know and are connected with is in danger or in trouble, do nothing. There must be no connections under any circumstance. Families, friends and loved ones are excluded from consideration. Don't ask about them, don't care about them, don't help them, don't miss them when they're gone. And no other Jedi can help them, either. If they die, they die. Que sera sera.

    Unless the Jedi or the Republic is in danger. Then, all bets are off. Break the law, abandon policy. And if someone calls the Jedi on it, it's their problem, not the Jedi's.

    Sorry, but if someone is asking for help, you try and help. If someone they love and care about is in trouble, you offer aid. You don't give them, "Ignore it and it'll go away" or "Act like they're already gone."
     
  20. only one kenobi

    only one kenobi Jedi Master star 4

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    Nov 18, 2012
    Yep...because Lucas wanted them that way. Anakin had to be, essentially, pounded into the dark side by...well, everyone else. I mean, heaven forbid it might have had something to do with him.....
     
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  21. darth-sinister

    darth-sinister Manager Emeritus star 10 VIP - Former Mod/RSA

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    That's not the Jedi policy. Anakin and Obi-wan do not know, or think that she's in trouble until it is too late. If Anakin was really concerned, he could have buggered out on his own and gone to check on her, a month earlier than he did. He wouldn't have acted so calmly and rationally like he does in Padme's apartment, if he was worried about her as he does when he's on Naboo. If Anakin was so concerned, why does he change the subject and say, "I'd rather dream about Padme?" Some concern there.

    No one is at fault here, because Anakin had a hard time discerning what it was that he was seeing. Not every Jedi can see things that clearly. And if he didn't think the Jedi way was fair, he was free to drop out and go back to Tatooine. No one was holding him back. No one was forbidding him from going. Ten years, he never asks about his mother. Never makes any type of outreach on his own, which shows how dedicated he really was to her. That he didn't know that she was freed, or married. Again, he could've left on his own if he really wanted to. Just like he could have gone to Naboo to see Padme. Or he could have left the Outer Rim Sieges to check on Padme.

    As to seeking help from the Jedi, he never asked for their help. He never went over Obi-wan's head to Yoda. He never tried to contact Obi-wan or the Council, when he makes the decision to leave Naboo and go to Tatooine. Later on when he goes to Yoda, he doesn't come clean. Now was the time to do so. Forget being a Jedi and just come out and tell him about Padme. But he doesn't. He chooses to be selfish when he should have been selfless. Deal with the consequences later. Padme even suggests bringing Obi-wan in on his concerns and he refuses, and becomes angry by that suggestion. He's offended by it.

    Families and friends do matter, but at times, the greater good is more important. He had to be willing to sacrifice Padme in order to save her. But he couldn't do that and so he damns everyone. What laws were broken by the Jedi? When they went to Geonosis? They had consent from the Chancellor. Abandon policy? What was abandoned? Fighting to protect people was wrong? If they sat on their asses, wouldn't be betraying the Jedi Code? Even Yoda admitted that fighting wasn't wrong, but what was wrong was in how they did it.
     
    Last edited: Mar 8, 2018
  22. Kenneth Morgan

    Kenneth Morgan Chosen One star 5

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    May 27, 1999
    I find it difficult to believe that Ani never even once asked about his mother or showed concern for her. We don't see what happened over the years between TPM and AOTC. I figure he did ask and was told, "You shouldn't ask that. Pay attention to your studies." And why wouldn't the Jedi, on their own, make sure she was OK. Or how the families of any Jedi were? These families gave up a child to them; isn't it right the Jedi should let them at least know their kid was alive and well? And I seriously doubt that if Ani said, "I'm taking a ship and going to Tatooine," that Kenobi et al would've just said, "Sure, here are the keys. Return it with a full tank." Or if he said, "I quit," they wouldn't have pulled out all the stops to get the Chosen One to stick around.

    As for going over Kenobi's head to Yoda, most likely Ani didn't think it was needed. After all, Kenobi was his master, his teacher, and his friend. Why wouldn't he be sympathetic and offer good advice? Three years later, though, Ani seems to be less willing to go to him, going to Yoda instead. And when he does, he's offered poorly-worded advice and defeatist pronouncements. By the time the crisis happens, Ani has no idea of who's going to offer the help he needs. The Jedi don't seem to care, so he goes with Palpatine. If the Jedi had offered more real sympathy and more helpful advice, who knows?

    As for policy abandoned, "We're keepers of the peace, not soldiers." As for laws broken, how about forcing the Supreme Chancellor to step down without consulting the Senate, arresting the Supreme Chancellor without warrant or hard evidence, and plotting to assume control of the Republic until they, the Jedi, decide all is well? Palpatine could've just sat back and done nothing, and the Jedi would've gotten severely busted in the courts. The Jedi were so insular that they didn't realize how they'd set themselves up for a big fall until it was too late (or until Yoda called down the lightning, but I won't get into that one).
     
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  23. FarEasterling

    FarEasterling Jedi Knight star 1

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    Aug 18, 2011
    There wasn't any particular flaw in the Jedi. They trudged through the drifts of history, probed, learned and evolved as much as they could to handle the situation at hand. In the past, there were times that brought doom upon the Jedi when they chose to change instead of sticking to tradition. It explains why they are so rigid in the waning years of the Republic when everything around falls apart.
    As a mirror opposition to the Jedi, the Sith had a past that was the Jedi's future. In the past, the Sith chose to stick to their tradition, and their tradition proved to be the cause of their own termination; when both Orders crossed their courses again, the Sith knew exactly whereto the Jedi were going on the evolution ladder at the moment. The Sith used that moment. The Jedi in that connection are blamed for blindness. Much like the vast majority of the Sith during their final civil war. Because the Sith future means the Order of Two, so the knowledge where the Sith were going and how to handle it, required just a minimal squad of the Jedi as well. These Jedi passed further to the Sith future (immortality) and stopped time (Force ghosts).
    There is no flaw. Not a scratch.
     
    Last edited: Mar 9, 2018
  24. Iron_lord

    Iron_lord Chosen One star 10

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    Sep 2, 2012
    Given the whole "Afraid to lose her, I think" followed by "he will not be trained"

    doesn't it seem more likely that, after the Jedi reversed their decision, Anakin concluded that showing any desire to find out about his mother's fate, would get him into trouble - risk him getting expelled from the Order?

    Hence my concern about the possibility that he was shamed into "trying to behave exactly as he thought the Jedi wanted."
    Makes sense to me.

    Interestingly, in the TPM novel, Obi-Wan says "You will see her again, but when you do, you will be a Jedi Knight"

    Translation - "Until you pass trials and become a Jedi Knight, we will not permit you to go see her."
     
    Last edited: Mar 9, 2018
  25. darth-sinister

    darth-sinister Manager Emeritus star 10 VIP - Former Mod/RSA

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    Short of chopping off his limbs and putting him in the citadel, there is no way to force him to stay. Nor does that seem to be the Jedi way. As to his mother, we don't know what all happened. He might not have asked about her. Just because he thought about her, like he did about Padme, doesn't mean that he will ask about her. As to the Jedi families, unless they come looking for their kids or become someone of political influence, the Jedi probably don't keep track of the families. They only know about the Lars because Anakin went back to Tatooine and told them most of what happened. As to the parents, the Jedi probably don't encourage the families to make contact.

    Anakin goes to Yoda, not for advice, but for knowledge about the Force. Yoda is the oldest living Jedi and he would know the secrets to cheating death. That's why he's there. That's why Lucas said that Anakin goes to the gods for help and he's turned down, since he's only offered advice on how to deal with loss and not stopping it. He only goes with Palpatine, not because of sympathy or advice, but because he offered him what he wanted in the first place. Unless Yoda said, "The power to cheat death can be accomplished by someone as powerful as you." He wasn't going to be satisfied.

    Which doesn't mean that Jedi don't fight in wars. They're just not trained to only be soldiers.

    Palpatine himself was also breaking the law, by starting a fake war and covering up that he was a Sith Lord. And the film itself is very vague on the matter of whether the Jedi did have the authority to do what they attempted to do. If Anakin hadn't betrayed the Jedi, they would have been able to prove Palpatine's guilt and no action would be taken against them.

    Not really. An inquiry wouldn't be grounds for expulsion. Much less going to see her, since they never kick him out when he did go to Tatooine. Killing a bunch of Tusken Raiders in retaliation for her death, though, would be grounds for expulsion.

    That's a stretch. I'm certain what he said was what he meant. That when he goes back to Tatooine to see Shmi, he will have completed his training and he will be living up to what he said during dinner.

    ANAKIN: "I had a dream I was a Jedi. I came back here and freed all the slaves."
     
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