Senate The Future of the Republican Party

Discussion in 'Archive: The Senate Floor' started by Jabbadabbado, Nov 6, 2008.

  1. CQuigley Guest

    Member Since:
    At least she would be a fun president.

    :D
  2. Alpha-Red Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Apr 25, 2004
    star 5
    The only "revolt" by the Republican base against their leaders was simply that the base thinks the leadership isn't extreme enough. The Tea Party was never genuinely libertarian...their views simply echoed that of the party leadership whether it was on social issues, the budget, and it'll be true of defense as well.
  3. CQuigley Guest

    Member Since:
    I don't recall the Tea Party having a coherent foreign policy.
  4. Jabba-wocky Chosen One

    Member Since:
    May 4, 2003
    star 8
    None of the Tea Party positions are very coherent, unless you've found some ways to reconcile the anti-government spending campaign with their insistence that you leave their Medicare and Social Security alone. But what they do tend to highlight is the most radical, visceral, and resentment-fueled elements in any policy. I'd expect this to manifest in neo-con hawkishness.
  5. LostOnHoth Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Feb 15, 2000
    star 5
    I think there are probably even more people who think Arnold Schwarzenegger would make a great President. It's terrifying.
    Darth-Ghost likes this.
  6. ShaneP Ex-Mod Officio

    Member Since:
    Mar 26, 2001
    star 6
    I can safely say the GOP has alienated me for the foreseeable future based on their asinine foreign policy alone.

    But you add in some of the anti-science and gay remarks and I think they have to come a long way to earn my vote again.

    They haven't had it in prez vote since Dole in 96 but still.
    Last edited by ShaneP, Oct 12, 2012
  7. Juliet316 Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Apr 27, 2005
    star 7
    Would these be people who bought into the Independence Day canon that Schwarzennegger would be President in 2016 due to an Amendment to the Constitution?
  8. Jedi Merkurian Episode VII Thread-Reaper

    Manager
    Member Since:
    May 25, 2000
    star 6
    That was actually Demolition Man.:-B
    Last edited by Jedi Merkurian, Oct 18, 2012
  9. Juliet316 Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Apr 27, 2005
    star 7

    :oops::oops::oops:

    I know that. Really I did. I don't know why I put Independence Day in lieu of Demolition Man.:oops:
  10. Juliet316 Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Apr 27, 2005
    star 7
  11. Crix-Madine Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Aug 7, 2000
    star 4
  12. Ramza JC Head Admin and RPF Manager

    Administrator
    Member Since:
    Jul 13, 2008
    star 6
    He never stood a chance, and I wouldn't have voted for him in the general, but goddammit, we could've had great excuses to link this
    DantheJedi and Darth Geist like this.
  13. Darth Guy Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Aug 16, 2002
    star 10
    He's a moderate 'cause he believes evolution is a fact and the massive amounts of greenhouse gasses that humans produce are causing the planet to get warmer. Never mind that most of his other views are in line with the rest of his party.
  14. Jedi Merkurian Episode VII Thread-Reaper

    Manager
    Member Since:
    May 25, 2000
    star 6
    This is my hope for the future of the Republican Party:

    [IMG]

    To blazes with partisanship. Work alongside whoever, regardless of politics.
  15. Alpha-Red Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Apr 25, 2004
    star 5
    Haha, I guess I wasn't the only one to think of that. But yeah, Huntsman doesn't have much of a future in the GOP. As an independent, maybe.
  16. Ghost Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Oct 13, 2003
    star 6
    So... do they move to the right or center?

    They already have started to crucify Christie...
  17. KnightWriter Administrator Emeritus

    Member Since:
    Nov 6, 2001
    star 8
    As always, my first thought upon reading this thread title is, "there isn't one."
  18. Condition2SQ Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Sep 5, 2012
    star 4
    If they don't follow David Frum's example, they're on their way to extinction. The major ongoing demographic shifts all work against them.
  19. KnightWriter Administrator Emeritus

    Member Since:
    Nov 6, 2001
    star 8
    Self-preservation isn't limited to individuals. They'll change.
  20. Condition2SQ Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Sep 5, 2012
    star 4
    They will, I just wonder who is out there is going to spearhead the movement of expunging the most unpalatable parts of their message.
  21. Ghost Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Oct 13, 2003
    star 6
    They'll only change when more moderates vote in GOP primaries... which still isn't likely
    Lowbacca_1977 and Alpha-Red like this.
  22. Darth Guy Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Aug 16, 2002
    star 10
    I think that they'll have to see real, lasting losses in Congress (maybe also in state governments) for them to think about really changing. Just being shut out of the Presidency isn't going to convince them.
    Last edited by Darth Guy, Nov 6, 2012
    Jedi Merkurian likes this.
  23. Alpha-Red Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Apr 25, 2004
    star 5
    Actually just got me thinking...how come the Democrats don't have this problem?
  24. Alpha-Red Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Apr 25, 2004
    star 5
    (double post)
    Last edited by Alpha-Red, Nov 7, 2012
  25. Juliet316 Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Apr 27, 2005
    star 7
    People, like me, who used to vote for moderate/socially left - leaning Republicans, acutally need moderate GOP candidates to vote for. Until then, people like me will likely declare themselves independent and vote for the party that's not lead by the bat crazies and doesn't want to look up my skirt to regulate my reproductive rights.
    Valairy Scot and NYCitygurl like this.
  26. Lowbacca_1977 Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Jun 28, 2006
    star 6
    They're going to do exactly what they did after the 2008 election, decide that they need to move FURTHER right because the candidate was too moderate and that's why they lost. To me, that makes them not so much of a nonissue as a dangerous wild card. They'd also used same-sex marriage as a thing to help propel people to the polls, so I'm also wondering how, if they're running out of states to do that trick in, they'll get people emotionally invested enough to vote even if the candidates are a bit scattered.

    What they do need is a more moderate influence, and offhand, I get the feeling that that is where they lost ground, although I've not yet gone through and checked that. The extreme candidates like Akin didn't win.... but that wasn't a loss of territory. If they keep this up, they may be putting them into a spot where they are stuck at almost taking control of the government, but never able to, until something happens that fractures the Democratic Party sufficiently that the Republican Party gets a new influx, or possibly, if the LIbertarian Party gets a few percent bigger, and the Republicans reposition themselves to try to absorb Libertarian voters if they find that they're always a few % down, and the LIbertarian Party is representing 10% of the vote (it was a surprisingly decent chunk in a few states where it was in the mid-digits)

    Alternative long shot: Somehow work to capitalize the Puerto Rico statehood issue. The governor is Luis Fortuno, who is a member of the Republican National Committee. It's another one of those avenues that can break them out of the demographic mold in the continental 48 without it coming off as pandering. (The other option being trying to tap into the already fairly Republican Cuban population in Florida in a more effective fashion). It's a fairly cheap bit of identity politics, but would shake off stereotypes.
    Last edited by Lowbacca_1977, Nov 7, 2012