Amph The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey, The Desolation of Smaug, Battle of the Five Armies

Discussion in 'Community' started by -Courtney-, Nov 25, 2006.

  1. Rogue1-and-a-half Manager Emeritus who is writing his masterpiece

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    Quote of the ******* year.
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  2. Miana Kenobi Costuming & Props Mod - Retired Admin

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    @VadersLaMent, me and my sig thank you for the screencaps link.
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  3. VadersLaMent Chosen One

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    I spelled it 'Jassic Park'. :rolleyes:
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  4. Chancellor_Ewok Force Ghost

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    I would not recommend seeing it 3D, if they are showing at 48 FPS.
  5. Merlin_Ambrosius69 Force Ghost

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    Inversely, I recommend it in 3D @ 48 fps.
  6. Legolas Skywalker Force Ghost

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  7. laurethiel1138 Force Ghost

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    I just got another bit of Fridge Logic (Brilliance?) while thinking about the relatively beardless Dwarves of the Line of Durin (Thorin, Kili and Fili). Given the Dwarves' fondness for the Badass Beard trope, I thought that, aside from the Adaptational Attractiveness bit, they might be justified in-universe by inverting the Beard of Sorrow trope, in that Durin's heirs would refuse to grow the beard until they have restored Erebor to its former glory and are able to adorn their beard in state like Thror, King under the Mountain. I think it is, at the very least, a more interesting explanation than the one making Kili the Dwarven equivalent of an emo teen who's rebelling against the customs of his kind...

    Cheers,
    Lauré :)
    Rew, Miana Kenobi and Summer Dreamer like this.
  8. Rosslcopter Jedi Grand Master

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    How do you explain the lack of epic beards in the pre-dragon scenes?
  9. laurethiel1138 Force Ghost

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    @Rosslcopter
    That, as he was merely the grandson of the King, he was not yet worthy of growing the beard, and must wait for his majority or a major feat which proved his bravery to have it.

    Cheers,
    Lauré :)
  10. Miana Kenobi Costuming & Props Mod - Retired Admin

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    To not hide the sexy, of course.
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  11. Mar17swgirl Chosen One

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    Well, he has a longer beard in the prologue sequence - it's just pulled together in a decorative clip. Afterwards it's cut short.

    Agreed. Having seen it in both 24fps 2D and 48fps 3D, I definitely recommend the 48fps 3D. Much smoother, less blur and less flickering.
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  12. laurethiel1138 Force Ghost

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    Thanks for the precision. Having seen the film only once, I'll have to look for it again next time. It doesn't contradict my theory outright, though, and in fact may underline the idea that Torin was, at the time, a mere princeling still, with very much growing up to do before he'd be able to grow the beard.

    Cheers,
    Lauré :)
    Last edited by laurethiel1138, Jan 7, 2013
  13. I Are The Internets Chosen One

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    So what if at the ending when Smaug opens his eye, it's actually the eye of Sauron? Would there be turmoil and unrest in the cinemas?
  14. Chancellor_Ewok Force Ghost

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    That would be cool, but I doubt that they would do that.
  15. Chancellor_Ewok Force Ghost

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    In some places it looked great, like in Rivendell or during the riddle game, but in others, such as the Moria flashback, the Troll battle, or some of the Radagast scenes, it was a detriment. I realize that The Hobbit films are the first films to be shot this way, but in some places, the image resolution was so high that the movie look very artificial or seemed to be on fast forward. Some of the shots in the Warg chase, for example, actually looked as though they were not properly composited.
  16. laurethiel1138 Force Ghost

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    Glaring spelling mistake corrected. :oops:

    Cheers,
    Lauré :)
    Random Comments likes this.
  17. Strilo Manager Emeritus

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    So suspend your disbelief and watch the story. Who cares overly about the technical aspects? It's about the story and characters. There are bad effects shots all over Lord of the Rings. Does that somehow affect the experience?
    Last edited by Strilo, Jan 7, 2013
  18. Chancellor_Ewok Force Ghost

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    There might very well be bad SFX shots in LOTR, but they're not as noticable, and this is my point. Because the image resolution is twice as high, the badly rendered shots are noticeable now, and it pulls you out of the story.
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  19. Miana Kenobi Costuming & Props Mod - Retired Admin

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    Only if you let it.
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  20. Everton Chosen One

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    I've seen the film twice now in HFR. Both times the first couple of scenes with Ian Holm as Bilbo and then the busy market scene in Dale appear to be in fast forward (although I experienced the same thing in 2D!), but after that nothing seemed to be moving any faster than I would expect. Everything was smooth, and detail (for the first time ever watching a 3D film) filled every inch of the screen. It was bright, too. Any problems with dodgy SFX (some of Radagast's bunny sleigh exploits) I put down to poor work generally. What looked poor in HFR also looked poor in 2D. The second time I saw the film in HFR I took (with trepidation!) my parents and another couple of the same age. We're talking people in their 60s. I was half expecting them to all retire with headaches after half an hour! :p Did HFR freak them out, or even cause them to 'bat an eyelid'? No. None of them had a bad word to say about it. Actually, that's not true... my Dad has one dodgy eye and so didn't get as much out of it as he might've. Still, afterwards they all had questions about the content of the film, but the look of it wasn't even an issue.
  21. VadersLaMent Chosen One

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    Reading The Hobbit for the first time is a little odd. People said the film, the first of three, is slow. The book feels like a fast forward summary. I do like the way Thorin comes to Bilbo's home over the book.
  22. Legolas Skywalker Force Ghost

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  23. Ender Sai Chosen One

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    I disagree that it is as simple as that.

    If something like clearly fake effects (or that the producers cast a Madame Tussaud's wax version of Christopher Lee in the film) takes out out of it, the story has failed to be sufficiently engaging and that's why you notice the "fakeness" of effects. As a child, I never noticed the effects in, say, the Reeve Superman films or the unraped Star Wars trilogy. I see them now, but that's after innumerable watches so it's to be expected.

    If people are seeing the fakeness, it's because they've already been unable to suspend disbelief not due to cynicism but due to the filmmaker failing to engage the audience. Do you really notice the eyelines are a bit off when using forced perspective to make the fellowship Hobbits smaller than humans? Not really, unless you're not really watching the film and it's on in the background, snatching the odd snippet of your attention.
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  24. Everton Chosen One

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    I noticed some fake looking effects (not connected with 48fps, IMHO), but that wasn't because I was unable to suspend my disbelief. It was because something out of place always sticks out. Great effect, great effect, great effect, poor effect, great effect, great effect. I know which one most people will remember. It's whether the "fakeness" bothers you, not whether you notice it. If you like the film (it's content), then it won't. If you don't, then it will. At least, that's my approach.
    Last edited by Everton, Jan 7, 2013
  25. Ender Sai Chosen One

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    More or less what I'm saying though, Everton. You know the ships in Star Wars (ignoring the dreadful prequels) are models, but there's such versimilitude in the scene that you forget it anyway. Or, you're too invested to really see it (and to be fair, at his age, Christopher Lee's body of work should be waning, not waxing [face_dancing])
    Rogue1-and-a-half likes this.