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The Mozart Effect: does it exist?

Discussion in 'Archive: The Amphitheatre' started by Mastadge, Oct 25, 2002.

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  1. Mastadge

    Mastadge Manager Emeritus star 7 VIP - Former Mod/RSA

    Registered:
    Jun 4, 1999
    Y'know, Mozart makes you smarter, classical music defragments your brain, yadayadayada. Do you think it's all true?
     
  2. Coolguy4522

    Coolguy4522 Jedi Youngling star 4

    Registered:
    Dec 21, 2000
    I don't think so, it just doesn't have all the bad effects of rock.
     
  3. AdamBertocci

    AdamBertocci Manager Emeritus star 7 VIP - Former Mod/RSA

    Registered:
    Feb 3, 2002
    Maybe it's just a placebo.




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  4. MariahJade2

    MariahJade2 Former Fan Fiction Archive Editor star 5 VIP

    Registered:
    Mar 18, 2001
    I saw a study once where they experimented with plants. They were given the same treatment, the same amount of light and water, but the only difference was that one plant was exposed to Rock music on a continual basis, and the other one Classical. The Classical plant grew faster and looked healthier.
     
  5. Rogue_Product

    Rogue_Product Jedi Padawan star 4

    Registered:
    Jun 12, 2002
    I listen to classical whilst studying, I find when it's on a level just below thinking point (ie not blaring away) I can concentrate better on what I'm doing. There is some proof of this scientifically, it has to do with the rhythm of the music matching brain waves and stimulating thought, although I can't quote figures or anything, we just get told it at school...
     
  6. Dark Lady Mara

    Dark Lady Mara Manager Emeritus star 7 VIP - Former Mod/RSA

    Registered:
    Jun 19, 1999
    Technically, there's no such thing as a brain wave.

    The "Mozart effect" was only proven from a study performed on college students whose cognitive abilities were found to show a slight temporary increase immediately after listening to Mozart. It's unlikely that you actually perform mental activities better while listening to Mozart because the music is highly complex, and if you're paying any attention to it whatsoever, even subconsciously, you're being distracted significantly from your work.
     
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