Amph The music! The drama! The 100 Greatest Operas (number 1 revealed inside!)

Discussion in 'Community' started by Obi Anne, Apr 16, 2009.

  1. Obi Anne FF admin Celebrations, Europe

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    14 die Meistersinger aus Nürnberg by Richard Wagner

    Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg (The Mastersingers of Nuremberg) is an opera in three acts, written and composed by Richard Wagner.

    Synopsis

    Act 1
    Scene 1: Interior of St. Katherine's Church in Nuremberg

    After a magnificent prelude, Mass is just ending as Walther von Stolzing, a young knight from Franconia addresses Eva Pogner, whom he had met earlier, and asks her if she is engaged to anyone. Eva has fallen in love with Walther at first sight, but she informs him that her father, the goldsmith and mastersinger Veit Pogner, has arranged to give her hand in marriage to the winner of the guild's song contest on St. John's Day (Midsummer's Day), tomorrow. Eva's maid, Magdalena, induces David, Hans Sachs' apprentice, to tell Walther about the mastersingers' art. The hope is for Walther to qualify as a mastersinger during the guild meeting, traditionally held in the church after mass, and thus earn a place in the song contest despite his utter ignorance of the master-guild's rules and conventions.

    Scene 2

    As the other apprentices set up the church for the meeting, David warns Walther that it is not easy to become a mastersinger; it takes many years of learning and practice. He proceeds to give a confused lecture on the mastersingers' rules for composing and singing. (Many of the tunes he describes were real master-tunes from the period.) Walther is confused by the complicated rules, but is determined to try for a place in the guild anyway.

    Scene 3

    The first mastersingers file into the church, including Eva's wealthy father Veit Pogner and the town clerk Beckmesser. Beckmesser, a clever technical singer who was expecting to win the contest without opposition, is distressed to see that Walther is Pogner's guest and intends to enter the contest. Meanwhile, Pogner introduces Walther to the other mastersingers as they arrive. Fritz Kothner the baker, serving as chairman of this meeting, calls the roll. Pogner, addressing the assembly, announces his offer of his daughter's hand for the winner of the song contest. When Hans Sachs argues that Eva ought to have a say in the matter, Pogner agrees that Eva may refuse the winner of the contest, but she must still marry a mastersinger. Another suggestion by Sachs, that the townspeople, rather than the masters, should be called upon to judge the winner of the contest, is squelched by the other masters. Pogner formally introduces Walther as a candidate for admission into the masterguild. Questioned by Kothner about his background, Walther states that the works of Walter von der Vogelweide were his poetic inspiration, and his teachers in music were the birds and nature itself. Reluctantly the masters agree to admit him, provided he can perform a master-song of his own composition. Walther chooses love as his topic for his song and therefore is to be judged by Beckmesser alone, the "Marker" of the guild. Walther launches into a novel free-form tune, obviously breaking all the mastersingers' rules, and his song is constantly interrupted by the scratch of Beckmesser's chalk on his chalkboard, maliciously noting one violation after another. When Beckmesser has completely covered the slate with symbols of Walther's errors, he interrupts the song and argues that there is no point in finishing it. Sachs tries to convince the masters to let Walther continue, but Beckmesser sarcastically tells Sachs to stop trying to set policy and instead, to finish making his (Beckmesser's) new shoes, which are overdue. The rest of the masters reject the knight.

    Act 2

    Scene 1: Evening in a Nuremberg street, at the corner between Pogner's house and Hans Sachs' workshop

    David informs Magdalena of Walther's failure. In her disappointment, Magdalena leaves without giving David the food she had brought for him. This arouses the derision of the other apprentices, and David is about to turn on them when Sachs arrives and hustles his apprentice into the workshop.

    Scene 2

    Pogner arrives with Eva, engaging in a roundabout conversation: Eva is hesitant to ask abo
  2. Thrawn1786 Force Ghost

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    This was one of the first operas I tried to listen to, back when I used to follow the libretto line by line. Mistake. Since then, I've learned my lesson, especially when it comes to Wagner, so I'd actually like to give Meistersinger another shot. I have the final scene on CD, and it's very moving.
  3. Nevermind Jedi Grand Master

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  4. Thrawn1786 Force Ghost

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    Back then, I didn't realize how long Meistersinger was. That's a lot of line following. :p
  5. Nevermind Jedi Grand Master

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    Are Wagner operas all longer than usual, or just this one?
  6. Obi Anne FF admin Celebrations, Europe

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    They are usually quite long, after all the Ring is essentially one opera and gets you 14-17 hours of music. I quite often feel that Wagner should have had a good editor or someone who could have told him to "cut that piece you don't need it".
  7. Thrawn1786 Force Ghost

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    With the Ring Cycle, it didn't help that he pretty much wrote the whole thing in a backward order. Or at least, that's what I always heard in regard to its composition: Wagner started out with Gotterdammerung, then realized some prequels would be needed for audiences to fully understand, so then came Siegfried, and so on.

    Nevermind: Meistersinger usually has a run-time of five and a half hours. I want to say Das Rheingold and The Flying Dutchman are his two shortest out of the works more commonly performed today, at two and a half hours each.

  8. Obi Anne FF admin Celebrations, Europe

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    And Rheingold is only a pre-evening, with four scenes without interruption. Compare that to for example Götterdämmerung where act I is 2 hours long on itself.
  9. Rogue1-and-a-half Manager Emeritus who is writing his masterpiece

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    I guess there's a reason "Wagnerian" became a word, huh?
  10. Obi Anne FF admin Celebrations, Europe

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    13 - Carmen by Georges Bizet

    Carmen is a French opéra comique by Georges Bizet. The libretto is by Henri Meilhac and Ludovic Halévy, based on the novella of the same title by Prosper Mérimée, first published in 1845.

    Synopsis
    lace: Seville, Spain
    Time: 1820
    Act 1

    A square in Seville. On the right a cigarette factory, on the left a guard house, with a bridge at the back.

    Moralès and the soldiers loiter before the guard house commenting on passers-by. Micaëla appears seeking Don José, a corporal, but is told by Moralès that he is not yet on duty, so why does she not stay and wait with them? She runs away saying that she will return later. Zuniga and José arrive with the new guard, imitated by a crowd of street-children.

    The factory bell rings and the cigarette girls emerge from the factory, greeted by young men who have gathered to flirt with them. The girls enter smoking cigarettes, and finally Carmen appears, and all the men ask her when she will love them. She replies in the famous Habanera. When they plead for her to choose a lover from among them, she tears a bunch of cassia from her bodice and throws it at Don José, who has been ignoring her, before going back into the factory with the others. José is annoyed by her insolence.

    Micaëla returns and gives him a letter?and a kiss?from his mother José longingly thinks of his home, and reading the letter sees that his mother wants him to return and get married. Micaëla is embarrassed and leaves, but Don José declares that he will marry her.

    As soon as she leaves, screams are heard from the factory and the women run out, singing chaotically. Don José and Zuniga find that Carmen has been fighting with another woman, and slashed her face with a knife. Zuniga asks Carmen if she has anything to say, but she replies impudently with a song. Zuniga instructs José to guard her while he writes out the warrant for prison. The women go back into the factory and the soldiers to the guardhouse. To escape, Carmen seduces José with a seguidilla about an evening date with her next lover who is "only a corporal"; José relents and unties her hands. Zuniga returns, and Carmen allows herself to be led away but turns, pushes José to the ground, and laughing cigarette girls surround Zuniga as she escapes.

    Act 2

    Evening at Lillas Pastia's inn, tables scattered around; officers and Gypsies relaxing after dinner

    A month has passed. Carmen and her friends Frasquita and Mercédès sing and dance. Lillas Pastia is trying to get rid of the officers, so Zuniga invites Carmen and her friends to come with him to the theatre, but she can only think of José, who was demoted and has been in jail since letting her escape, and was released the day before.

    The sound of a procession hailing Escamillo passes by outside, and the toreador is invited in. Escamillo sings the Toreador song, and flirts with Carmen, but Carmen tells him that for the time being he need not dream of being hers.

    When everyone except Carmen, Frasquita and Mercédès have left, the smugglers Dancaïre and Remendado arrive and tell the girls of their plans to dispose of the contraband they have smuggled via Gibraltar. Carmen refuses to accompany them, saying to their amazement that she is in love. As José's voice is heard, Dancaïre tells Carmen she must try to get Don José to join them. Alone together, José returns a gold coin Carmen had sent him in jail and she orders fruit and wine to be brought. Carmen vexes him with stories of her dancing for the officers but then dances with castanets for him alone. During her song the sound of bugles is heard calling the soldiers back to barracks.

    Carmen's temper flares when José says he must leave, but he makes her listen by producing the flower she threw at him, which he kept while he was in prison and is proof of his love. Carmen is unmoved and asks him to join her gypsy life if he really loves her. Her picture of a life of freedom tempts him but he finally refuses saying he will never be a deserter. He begins to leave when Zuniga enters hoping to find Carmen. Don José draws his sword
  11. Nevermind Jedi Grand Master

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    I saw a version on skates once. I'm not kidding.

    It starred Katarina Witt.
  12. Obi Anne FF admin Celebrations, Europe

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    It says something that I think that is the best version I've seen.

    And you shouldn't forget about Katarina Witt's legendary performance in the Olympics 1988. They even had to change the rules for figure skating so that you weren't allowed to die on the ice anymore.
  13. Nevermind Jedi Grand Master

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    [face_laugh]

    I'm guessing that "Carmen" has the most adaptations in other media. The skating one had two famous male skaters (at the time) as Don Jose and the Toreador. As you say, it worked better than you'd expect, as long as you didn't think about it too hard. [face_laugh] They replay it at lot at Christmas (!)
  14. Rogue1-and-a-half Manager Emeritus who is writing his masterpiece

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    I find Carmen somewhat overrated. I actually like Bizet's Pearlfishers a lot more, though I know that's a pretty rare opinion. But Carmen does have some good stuff in it, but it drags quite a bit, I find.
  15. Obi Anne FF admin Celebrations, Europe

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    12 - La Traviata by Giuseppe Verdi

    La traviata is an opera in three acts by Giuseppe Verdi set to an Italian libretto by Francesco Maria Piave. It is based on La dame aux Camélias (1852).

    Synopsis
    Place: Paris and its vicinity.[11]
    Time: Beginning of the 18th century

    Act 1

    The salon in Violetta's house

    Violetta Valéry, a famed courtesan, throws a lavish party at her Paris salon to celebrate her recovery from an illness. Gastone, a count, has brought with him his friend, the young nobleman Alfredo Germont, who has long adored Violetta from afar. While walking to the salon, Gastone tells Violetta that Alfredo loves her, and that while she was ill, he came to her house every day. Alfredo joins them, admitting the truth of Gastone's remarks.

    The Baron, Violetta's current lover, waits nearby to escort her to the salon where the Baron is asked to give a toast, but he refuses, and the crowd turns to Alfredo. From the next room, the sound of the orchestra is heard and the guests move there to dance. Feeling dizzy, Violetta asks her guests to go ahead and to leave her to rest until she recovers. While the guests dance in the next room, Violetta looks at her pale face in her mirror. Alfredo enters and expresses his concern for her fragile health, later declaring his love for her. At first she rejects him because his love means nothing to her, but there is something about Alfredo that touches her heart. He is about to leave when she gives him a flower, telling him to return it when it has wilted. She promises to meet him the next day.

    After the guests leave, Violetta wonders if Alfredo could actually be the one in her life. But she concludes that she needs freedom to live her life. From off stage, Alfredo's voice is heard singing about love as he walks down the street.

    Act 2

    Scene 1: Violetta's country house outside Paris
    Three months later, Alfredo and Violetta are living together in a peaceful country house outside Paris. Violetta has fallen in love with Alfredo and she has completely abandoned her former life. Alfredo sings of their happy life together. Annina, the maid, arrives from Paris, and, when questioned by Alfredo, tells him that she went there to sell the horses, carriages and everything owned by Violetta to support their country lifestyle.

    Alfredo is shocked to learn this and leaves for Paris immediately to settle matters himself. Violetta returns home and receives an invitation from her friend, Flora, to a party in Paris that evening. Alfredo's father, Giorgio Germont, is announced and demands that she break off her relationship with his son for the sake of his family, since he reveals that Violetta's relationship with Alfredo has threatened his daughter's engagement because of Violetta's reputation. Meanwhile, reluctantly, he becomes impressed by Violetta's nobility, something which he did not expect from a courtesan. She responds that she cannot end the relationship because she loves him so much, but Giorgio pleads with her for the sake of his family. With growing remorse, she finally agrees and says goodbye to Giorgio. In a gesture of gratitude for her kindness and sacrifice, Giorgio kisses her forehead before leaving her weeping alone.

    Violetta gives a note to Annina to send to Flora accepting the party invitation and, as she is writing a farewell letter to Alfredo, he enters. She can barely control her sadness and tears; she tells him repeatedly of her unconditional love. Before rushing out and setting off for Paris, she hands the farewell letter to her servant to give to Alfredo.

    Soon, the servant brings the letter to Alfredo and, as soon as he has read it, Giorgio returns and attempts to comfort his son, reminding him of his family in Provence. Alfredo suspects the Baron is behind his separation with Violetta and the party invitation, which he finds on the desk, strengthens his suspicions. He determines to confront Violetta at the party. Giorgio tries to stop Alfredo, but he rushes out.

    Scene 2: Party at Flora's house

    At the party, the Marquis tells Flora that Violetta and Alfredo have se
  16. aalagartassle Force Ghost

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    I saw it in Brisbane in 2009. heres an abridged student response

    The Live Queensland Performance of Giuseppe Verdi?s La Traviata was a brilliant showcase of traditional operatic conventions. Verdi was one of the more popular composers of the 19th Century because he used unconventional themes and led the way for new, innovative composers.

    Verdi?s use of traditional Operatic voices in La Traviata addressed the audience?s interest extensively. Violetta, the lead soprano had the perfect voice for Verdi?s vision. The belcanto of Violetta?s voice displayed an incredible range by singing remarkable high and low pitched notes at various dynamics. At times her vocal projection was unimaginable at such a high range with such a quiet dynamic, she sounded like she was whispering. Her voice greatly surpassed that of any of the other cast members. Violetta stole the show with her breath-taking voice. Another traditional voice used by Verdi, was Alfredo?s father Giorgio Gérmont, singing bass. The bass vocalist was traditionally an evil character and this opera was no exception. Although Giorgio had a powerful voice, it came nowhere near close to matching the voice of Violetta?s. His voice lacked dynamic contrast, however made up for his dynamics with a brilliant vibrato to his voice. These conventional voices addressed significant elements of Operatic music.

    Act I In the middle section of Act I, Alfredo and Violetta share a duet of a flirty nature. Violetta?s jolly, high-pitched voice sung with staccato ornamentation, expresses her flirty, happy nature towards Alfredo, while the orchestra accompanied the two, with flutes, cellos and violins. Although Violetta dominated Alfredo?s voice when they sang together, they each demonstrated the leitmotif of their love frequently and skillfully. This piece reaches its musical climax when Alfredo and Violetta are singing Acapella, without orchestral accompaniment. The first act is finally concluded with a Cavatina sung by Violetta expressing how she thinks Alfredo could be ?the one?. During the Cavatina, Alfredo is heard from outside singing the leitmotif that expresses his and Violetta?s affection for each other. Verdi introduced the Cavatina and Acapella to 19th century Opera.

    Act II begins with Giorgio?s leitmotif, a scary, dark sounding phrase that acknowledges his evil presence. The duet between Giorgio and Violetta starts with the orchestra setting the dark mood with the lower stringed section. The piece gradually increases speed and volume, which is closely followed by the shriek of the sopranos voice which complements the distraught, minor sound of the piece.

    The sets used by the Live Queensland Performance were extensive and profoundly elaborate. Traditionally, La Traviata as well as most other conventional Operas did not have such detailed and spectacular sets and lighting as the Live Queensland Performance of La Traviata did. Although this was not a traditional Operatic element, nor a vision of Verdi?s, the extensive set did give an extra amount of depth to the heightened realism of the performance.

    Many of the Operatic conventions used in Verdi?s La Traviata were that of a traditional opera. However Verdi introduced a number of his own elements to capture audience?s emotions and bring the circumstances addressed in his Operas to life. Verdi was a unique composer, as he could use the orchestra to build tension and make his shows memorable. The themes of La Traviata are not traditional; they break social class, as demonstrated by Alfredo Gérmont, a young nobleman falling in love with the likes of Violetta Valéry, a famed courtesan. In the majority of all Operas, love everlasting is a dominant theme. However expressed through the music of Verdi, La Traviata is a love tragedy. Instead of Alfredo and Violetta living happily ever after, Violetta dies of tuberculosis, leaving Alfredo emotionally destroyed.

    La Traviata was one of the more popular operas written by Verdi because it explored untraditional themes like love tragedy and included new, innovative and unconvent
  17. Nevermind Jedi Grand Master

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    Callas doesn't sound like a very likely Violetta, but I suppose it depends.
  18. Obi Anne FF admin Celebrations, Europe

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    11 Boris Godunov by Modest Mussorgsky

    Boris Godunov (Russian: ????? ???????, original orthography ?????? ????????, Borís Godunóv) is an opera by Modest Mussorgsky (1839?1881). The work was composed between 1868 and 1873 in Saint Petersburg, Russia. It is Mussorgsky's only completed opera and is considered his masterpiece.

    Before the synopsis it should be explained that the opera probably has one of the most complicated creation stories. Still today it's mostly performed in adaptions by other composters. Here under you have synopsis as in the original and first revision of the opers.

    Synopsis
    Setting
    Time: The years 1598 to 1605
    Place: Moscow; the Lithuanian frontier; a castle in Sandomierz; Kromï

    Part 1 / Prologue
    Scene 1: The Courtyard of the Novodevichiy Monastery near Moscow (1598)

    There is a brief introduction foreshadowing the 'Dmitriy Motif'. The curtain opens on a crowd in the courtyard of the monastery, where the weary regent Boris Godunov has temporarily retired. Nikitich the police officer orders the assembled people to kneel. He goads them to clamor for Boris to accept the throne. They sing a chorus of supplication. The people are bewildered about their purpose and soon fall to bickering with each other, resuming their entreaties only when the policeman threatens them with his club. Their chorus reaches a feverish climax. Andrey Shchelkalov, the Secretary of the Duma, appears from inside the convent, informs the people that Boris still refuses the throne of Russia, and requests that they pray that he will relent. An approaching procession of pilgrims sings a hymn, exhorting the people to crush the spirit of anarchy in the land, take up holy icons, and go to meet the Tsar. They disappear into the monastery.

    [Original 1869 Version only: The people discuss the statements of the pilgrims. Many remain bewildered about the identity of this Tsar. The police officer interrupts their discussion, ordering them to appear the next day at the Moscow Kremlin. The people move on, stoically exclaiming "if we are to wail, we might as well wail at the Kremlin".]

    Scene 2: [Cathedral] Square in the Moscow Kremlin (1598).

    The orchestral introduction is based on bell motifs. From the porch of the Cathedral of the Dormition, Prince Shuysky exhorts the people to glorify Tsar Boris. As the people sing a great chorus of praise, a solemn procession of boyars exits the cathedral. The people kneel. Boris appears on the porch of the cathedral. The shouts of "Glory!" reach a crescendo and subside. Boris delivers a brief monologue betraying a feeling of ominous foreboding. He prays for God's blessing, and hopes to be a good and just ruler. He invites the people to a great feast, and then proceeds to the Cathedral of the Archangel to kneel at the tombs of Russia's past rulers. The people wish Boris a long life. A crowd breaks toward the cathedral. The police officers struggle to maintain order. The people resume their shouts of "Glory!"

    Part 2 / Act 1
    Scene 1: Night. A Cell in the Chudov Monastery (1603)

    Pimen, a venerable monk, writes a chronicle of Russian history. The young novice Grigoriy awakes from a horrible (and prophetic) dream, which he relates to Pimen, in which he climbed a high tower, was mocked by the people of Moscow, and fell. Pimen advises him to fast and pray. Grigoriy regrets that he retired so soon from worldly affairs to become a monk. He envies Pimen's early life of adventure. Pimen speaks approvingly of Ivan the Terrible and his son Fyodor, who both exhibited great spiritual devotion, and draws a contrast with Boris, a regicide.

    [Original 1869 Version only: At Grigoriy's request, Pimen tells the vivid details of the scene of the murder of Dmitry Ivanovich, which he witnessed in Uglich.]

    Upon discovering the similarity in age between himself and the murdered Tsarevich, Grigoriy conceives the idea of posing as the Pretender. As Pimen departs for Matins, Grigoriy declares that Boris shall escape neither the judgment of the people, nor that of God.

    Scene 2: An Inn on the Lithuanian Border (1603
  19. aalagartassle Force Ghost

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    Having been part of the childrens ensemble [Sydney opera house along time ago]I can state that the childrens role was not silent, we sang alot. Mainly when we pickpocketed the Hermit. This was my favourite opera to be apart of, not all because of the Shenaginns back stage:p . The wonderful singers and emotion the opera carried made this great. The lovely texture of voice with alot of emotional reciative and compelling arias I was a bit young to understand it fully but over the years it still got better and better.
  20. Nevermind Jedi Grand Master

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    Fascinating subject for an opera; this is one I'd like to see.
  21. Obi Anne FF admin Celebrations, Europe

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    Wohoo, down to top 10 before the move!

    10 - Parsifal by Richard Wagner

    Parsifal (WWV 111) is an opera in three acts by Richard Wagner. It is loosely based on Wolfram von Eschenbach's Parzival, the 13th century epic poem of the Arthurian knight Parzival (Percival) and his quest for the Holy Grail, and on Chrétien de Troyes' Perceval, the Story of the Grail.

    Synopsis
    Place: the castle of Monsalvat in the mountains in the north of Spain, and Klingsor's magic palace in the south of Spain.

    Act 1

    Scene 1
    In a forest near the castle of Monsalvat, home of the Grail and its Knights, Gurnemanz, eldest Knight of the Grail, wakes his young squires and leads them in prayer. He sees Amfortas, King of the Grail Knights, and his entourage approaching. Amfortas has been injured by his own holy spear, and the wound will not heal.

    Gurnemanz asks its lead knight for news of the king?s health. The knight says the king has suffered during the night and is going early for a bath in the holy lake. The squires ask Gurnemanz to explain how the king?s injury can be healed, but he evades their question and a wild woman?Kundry?bursts in. She gives Gurnemanz a vial of balsam, brought from Arabia, to ease the King?s pain and then collapses, exhausted.

    Amfortas arrives, borne on a stretcher by Knights of the Grail. He calls out for Gawain, whose attempt at relieving the king's pain had failed. He is told that this knight has left again, seeking a better remedy. Raising himself somewhat, the king says going off without leave is the sort of impulsiveness which led himself into Klingsor?s realm, and to his downfall. He accepts the potion from Gurnemanz and tries to thank Kundry, but she answers hastily that thanks will not help and urges him onward, to his bath.

    The procession leaves. The squires eye Kundry with mistrust and question her. After a brief retort, she falls silent. Gurnemanz tells them Kundry has often helped the Grail Knights but that she comes and goes unpredictably. When he asks directly why she does not stay to help, she answers, "I never help!". The squires think she is a witch and sneer that if she does so much, why will she not find the Holy Spear for them? Gurnemanz reveals that this deed is destined for someone else. He says Amfortas was given guardianship of the Spear, but lost it as he was seduced by an irresistibly attractive woman in Klingsor?s domain. Klingsor grabbed the Spear and stabbed Amfortas: this wound causes Amfortas both suffering and shame, and will never heal on its own.

    Squires returning from the king?s bath tell Gurnemanz that the balsam has eased the King?s suffering. Gurnemanz's own squires ask how it is that he knew Klingsor. He solemnly tells them how both the Holy Spear, which pierced the side of the Redeemer on the Cross, and the Holy Grail, which caught the flowing blood, had come to Monsalvat to be guarded by the Knights of the Grail under the rule of Titurel? Amfortas? father. Klingsor had yearned to join the knights but, unable to keep impure thoughts from his mind, resorted to self-castration, causing him to be expelled from the order. Klingsor then set himself up in opposition to the realm of the Grail, learning dark arts, claiming the valley domain below and filling it with beautiful flower-maidens to seduce and enthrall wayward Grail Knights. It was here that Amfortas lost the Holy Spear, kept by Klingsor as he schemes to get the Grail, too. Gurnemanz tells how Amfortas later had a holy vision which told him to wait for a ?pure fool, enlightened by compassion? who would finally heal the wound.

    At just this moment, cries are heard from the Knights: a flying swan has been shot, and a young man is brought forth, a bow in his hand and a quiver of matching arrows. Gurnemanz speaks sternly to the lad saying this is a holy place. He asks him outright if he shot the swan, and the lad boasts that if it flies, he can hit it Gurnemanz asks what harm the swan had done, and shows the youth its lifeless body. Now remorseful, the young man breaks his bow, casting it aside. Gurnemanz asks him why he is
  22. CloneUncleOwen Force Ghost

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    I've always enjoyed the Parsifal finale, because if performed properly, it borders on something out of Star Wars.

    [face_laugh]

    Note: Depending on when and where Parsifal is performed, it is considered inappropriate to applaud at the ending.
  23. Nevermind Jedi Grand Master

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    TWO HOURS! [face_hypnotized]

    The first act alone?

    How long does the whole thing take?
  24. Obi Anne FF admin Celebrations, Europe

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    The music alone, without any breaks usually takes something like 4,5 hours. In general my view of Wagner is that he writes loooooooong operas and you think they are so much, but just when you are about to get bored and stop listening he hits you with a sledgehammer of wonderful music. There's simply no escape.

    Oh, yes the whole "no applauding" at Parsifal controversy. One some places it's considered rude to applaud at all, on other it's OK. Wagner himself didn't want people to interrupt the performance itself, but didn't mind applauding at the end.

  25. Obi Anne FF admin Celebrations, Europe

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    Yes, it's time to continue the countdown! Stay tuned for the final 9? operas.