PT The Prophecy

Discussion in 'Prequel Trilogy' started by Garrett Atkins, Feb 26, 2013.

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  1. Garrett Atkins Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Feb 11, 2013
    star 4
    Four questions about the Prophecy of the Chosen One:
    1. What does the Prophecy say?
    2. When was it written?
    3. Who wrote it?
    4. What does bringing balance to the force mean?
    Last edited by Garrett Atkins, Feb 26, 2013
  2. DARTHVENGERDARTHSEAR Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Jun 8, 2002
    star 5
    No one knows.
    Last edited by DARTHVENGERDARTHSEAR, Feb 26, 2013
  3. PiettsHat Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Jan 1, 2011
    star 4
    1. The prophecy states that a person conceived of midichlorians will bring balance to the Force. This would be achieved by destroying the Sith.

    2. Unknown

    3. Unknown

    4. Destroying the Sith
  4. Joe Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Dec 25, 2012
    star 6
    Either GL wanted certain elements of the Force to remain mysterious and undefined, or GL needed a generic prophecy to propel the plot. No matter which is true, the prophecy ended up being a mystery, something I feel was a move for the better.
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  5. sg1A Jedi Youngling

    Member Since:
    Feb 20, 2013
    star 1
    Awesome questions.Made me think (brain hurts).
    we know two of those , or i think that i know all the information on this subject.
    I quickly jumped on wookipedia.
  6. sg1A Jedi Youngling

    Member Since:
    Feb 20, 2013
    star 1
    (Came back fro reading)
    yep all answers confirmed we do not know the origins of this prophecy just when it came about.
    And i was not able to find who wrote this so called prophecy.
  7. DARTHVENGERDARTHSEAR Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Jun 8, 2002
    star 5
    Agreed.

    They make it seem like it's kind of important in TPM, but in ROTS they make it seem like it isn't. Thus explaining why it isn't mentioned in the OT.
    Last edited by DARTHVENGERDARTHSEAR, Feb 27, 2013
  8. Samuel Vimes Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Sep 4, 2012
    star 4
    Well my feelings are rather the opposite.
    I feel that the prophecy was underdeveloped and this made it seem redundant.
    It started like: "We have this Prophecy, this is very important!" Then it became: "Oh wait, not really, lets forget I said anything."

    They bring the prophecy up but don't really talk about what they should do with it and we aren't shown much what Anakin thinks about it.
    I don't mind the prophecy as a concept, but I found the execution of it lacking and I think time could have been better spent elsewhere.
    Anakin has enough going on and he doesn't need a prophecy to be interesting. He is a moving force and goes through many changes, he doesn't have to be a chosen one on top of that. It seems like this was added to make the story seem more EPIC but to me it was not needed.
    Had they done something interesting with it then it might have been good but to me they didn't.

    The Matrix films did some interesting things with prophecy and chosen ones. Neo becomes the ONE and in film two we have one scene when the people of Zion treat him almost like a God which was interesting and I wish that the films had done more with that. The second film also turns the prophecy on it's head when it is revealed to be a lie, just another system of controll.

    In closing, as they now stand, I think the PT films would have been better off without the prophecy and that time could have been better spent with other things and then RotS might not have felt as rushed as I think it did.

    Bye for now.
    Blackboard Monitor
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  9. janstett Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    May 29, 2004
    star 3
    This is the guy who completely ruined the force with a Midichlorian Counter....

    No, the reason the prophecy is an enigma is simply bad storytelling. Lucas needed a reason for Qui-Gon to take Anakin to Coruscant, and simply being force sensitive wasn't sufficient for some unknown reason. He had to really drive it home by making him Space Jesus. I doubt any more thought went into it than that.

    It's very much like how I imagine "Order 66" came about in the script. "Hmmm, I need something evil-sounding. How about Order 666? No, too obvious. I've got it, Order 66. Now onto the murder montage..."
    Last edited by janstett, Feb 28, 2013
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  10. Eggrert Jedi Youngling

    Member Since:
    Jul 12, 2005
    star 1
    I disagree. He ruined the Force (or at least the manner in which people can tap into its powers) by introducing a biological component in Return of the Jedi.


    While I tend to agree, I don't think the idea was necessarily inherently flawed. Watch the trailer for TPM again; if handled correctly, the "Chosen One" plot could have worked. But I agree that omitting the prophecy element would have been a far better decision and would have added more richness to the characters (instead of the Jedi basically keeping Anakin around because they fear what he might become).
  11. Alexrd Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Jul 7, 2009
    star 5
    Care to explain the correlation? Midi-chlorians are merely an indication of Force potential. They aren't the Force. But how was the Force "completely ruined"?

    So, you claim that it was bad storytelling based on... nothing. Expected.

    Baseless speculation. Again. For some reason I'm not surprised.
    Last edited by Alexrd, Feb 28, 2013
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  12. The Supreme Chancellor Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Sep 4, 2012
    star 4
    I think it's pretty obviously addressed in AOTC and ROTS. There is a prophecy that is vaguely defined in the Jedi Archives, but traditionally is beleived to mean that a Jedi will bring balance to the Force by destroying the Sith. But for whatever reason they are not completely sure what is says. I think for GL to go through the trouble of specifically defining the prophecy would have been redundant.
  13. Eggrert Jedi Youngling

    Member Since:
    Jul 12, 2005
    star 1
    In the first two films, we got the impression that the Force was something that anyone could tap into, if only they believed in it enough. That made it a magical concept, and it spoke to the characters of Luke and Han that one of them believed in it completely and the other scoffed at its existence.

    If your ability to know the will of the Force is based on a biological component, it throws that beautiful idea out of the window. Yes, you can still use the Force, but your potential is limited by genetics instead of your own faith and open-mindedness. For all of the Christian undertones in the SW saga, the introduction of midichlorians undercuts the entire mythology. Surely one's ability to communicate with God has nothing to do with genetics! [For the record, I'm an agnostic, and I really don't want to derail this thread with a debate over religion; I'm only bringing this up to emphasize that, once upon a time, one's ability to use the Force seemed to be based entirely on faith and spirituality).

    Midichlorians also make the Force appear to be some sort of "deity" (for lack of a better term) that favours certain individuals or lineages over others (which introduces its own realm of problems). I cringe every time I hear Luke say, "The Force is strong in my family." Goodbye beautiful Zen idea...

    Which is more satisfying: Han scoffing at the Force because he has a low midichlorian count, or because he's simply a closed-minded rascal who's "never seen anything to make [him]
    believe there's one all-powerful force controlling everything"?
  14. I Are The Internets Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Nov 20, 2012
    star 8
    Yoda wrote it as a joke, but when people actually believed it, he went along with it. That's why he has a mischievous grin on his face when he suggests that the prophecy was misread.
  15. Alexrd Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Jul 7, 2009
    star 5
    Sorry, but I never got that impression. There is no explanation in ANH or TESB fory why it needs to be Luke (or "the other") to destroy Vader and the Emperor. In fact, the impression it gives is that it can't be anyone that can do that.

    The ability to use the power of the Force is limited, but not to hear its will (because as stated in the movies, every living being has midi-chlorians).

    The ability to commune with the Force has nothing to do with genetics.

    I don't see any indication that the Force favours one person over the other. But it does chose one person to perform a task, which goes in line with the Christian undertones you claim were undercut (they weren't).

    Why?

    The first of those claims is a strawman. The second is what is in the movie.
  16. SithStarSlayer Manager Emeritus

    Member Since:
    Oct 23, 2003
    star 6
    I agree. Questions answered.

    Locking.
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