The Two Towers! WOOOFFFFF

Discussion in 'Phoenix, AZ' started by ChoadsGirl, Dec 18, 2002.

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  1. Duguay Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Nov 30, 2002
    star 2
    Just double-checked, Silmarillion was able to shed some light on the whole thing. A few extracts:

    From early in the section entitled, Of the rings of power and the third age: "Therefore The Three remained unsullied, for they were forged by Celebrimbor alone..."

    Entry from the index of names, a paraphrase of Celebrimbor; he is the son of Curufin, made the three elven rings.

    Curufin is the "fifth son of Feanor".

    Feanor made 3 Silmarili, which means "jewel" in one of the elvish tongues.

    I won't dispute the statement about Glorfindel; he had an disagreement with a balrog near the end of the first age, so he must have been a tough cookie.
  2. Jedi_Wench Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Sep 8, 2002
    star 4
    Cool, thanks for explaining the immortality thing to me. I had a feeling it was something like that.

    My hubby and I were discussing it last night and I suggested that maybe they could only be killed if they chose to fight or if they had lost a love.

    I wasn't very far off then! :D COOL!

    I really need to read more of Tolkien's work. I have such a long reading list now, I don't know when that'll happen! [face_laugh]
  3. Phoenyx Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Jun 5, 2002
    star 1
    okay so I was half right. Feanor made the jewels, and his decendant who wound up marrying Galadriel, set them in teh rings. My memories of my trips through the Simariliion are dusty. But then the book was so dry even the dustbunnies carried canteens.....
  4. Duguay Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Nov 30, 2002
    star 2
    I am inclined to agree, it was tough going, as books are concerned. The benefits, though, when I read the Hobbit and LotR again after I had finished it...well it was definitely worthwhile. I suddenly found that the parts that confused me the first time I read it were the most exciting parts...the sections that refer to the ancient history and legends of Middle-Earth. But yes, Silmarillion is pretty dry.
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