[Weekly Task 2 ] ~Suzuki_Akira Interview~

Discussion in 'Big Brother Guys' started by ApolloSmileGirl, Jul 10, 2007.

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  1. ApolloSmileGirl Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Jun 18, 2004
    star 8
    Welcome to the Suzuki_Akira edition of BBB interviews/Weekly task 2!

    This is one of seven interviews that will be conducted on the boys of the house, in the next few days. Please feel free to comment, and strike up conversation about the questions, and answers that were brought up, in this and every other upcoming interview.

    The questions, by me, your hostess, are in bold. SA's answers are in normal text. Enjoy. :)



    1. You have a very interesting username. How did you come up with it, and what exactly did you mean to portray with it? Does it have any significant meaning(personal, or otherwise) that may not make sense to other users, unless you explained it.

    Well, when I was young I took to writing. I learned to read pretty early in life, writing just seemed like a natural step. Some of my early attempts include "The Motor Monster", a sad, sad attempt at a short story, and "Akira Suzuki: Trial By Fire". I was going through the anime/Eastern culture phase at the time, and I began writing a full length novel starring Akira Suzuki - I carefully noted that in Japan, his name would be family name first, then given name: Suzuki Akira. With every chapter I became infinitely better at writing prose, and each time I'd look away from it for a week and come back to it I'd see writing that was immature and juvenile, and improve upon it. Unfortunately the entire premise of the novel was juvenile, so much as I improved the actual writing over the years, I stopped shopping it to publishers just because it was a stupid idea. I actually got accepted by a publisher called "Branch and Vine" that mailed me a contract, and subsequently went belly up. Whether or not the thing was a scam I do not know to this day.


    2. Describe to me what Hip-hop truly means to you. The music, the culture, the current state of the genre. What are some of your most important influences, in the house that built Hip-Hop? Most importantly, is Hip-Hop the love of your life?

    Hip hop really meant a lot to me. It was more than just a really cool and innovative form of expression. My forays into hip hop led into forays of black history and expression, which I can best attribute to X Clan and Public Enemy. This was especially important for me as I got into hip hop around the same time as I became cognizant of the racial boundaries, to put it delicately, between me and most of those surrounding me. Currently my influence in Hip Hop, I have to break it down. When we're talking pioneers who allowed hip hop to advance and evolve, I'm thinking Kool G Rap and Rakim. I mean, hip hop has a rich history, so they are relative newcomers to, say, Kool Herc, but nevertheless they offer a lot. As for classics from the 90's, Big Pun and Big L. Just sheer lyricism there. Q-Tip and Large Professor as far as stylistic/production goes. And people who are still in the game, Nas, Eminem, Brother Ali. My highest respects go to the musically immortal KRS-One and DJ Premier.

    The current state of hip hop bothers me. It's not that there's no good hip hop, not even that there's no good commercial hip hop, it's that hip hop is such a ****ing gimmick. It's some *** damn minstrelsy. Musicians wearing jewelry that weighs more than they do - I don't have a problem with club music, it serves its purpose, but the Golden Era happened for a reason. People are now making ish that doesn't even qualify as commercial now, just as 'retarded' - which is apparently a cool new trend (Go DUMB!). Is hip hop the love of my life? Maybe, but I think the bitch is cheating on me.


    3. What are your plans after you graduate High School? Future aspirations? Do you know what you want to major in, or will you be entering college undeclared? If you have a particular career path, please explain what it is, and why you feel passionate enough to follow up on that particular field.

    Ugh. Everyone wants to ask these questions at this point in time. I want to become a lawyer in some field where paperwork is at a minimum and pay is at a maximum, ideally. But I'd like to see if I cou
  2. Darth Guy Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Aug 16, 2002
    star 10
    It frightens me that I have the same basic career interest as Suzie A. [face_worried]
  3. Souderwan Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Jun 3, 2005
    star 6
    Well, when I was young I took to writing.

    Now that's interesting! I did not know that about you! :) I have to admit that my knowledge of Japanimation is about as good as my knowledge of the post-RotJ EU--i.e. I know that it exists but it could be a myth for all I know--but I think it's cool that you got into that stuff as a kid!

    Hip hop really meant a lot to me. It was more than just a really cool and innovative form of expression. My forays into hip hop led into forays of black history and expression, which I can best attribute to X Clan and Public Enemy. This was especially important for me as I got into hip hop around the same time as I became cognizant of the racial boundaries, to put it delicately, between me and most of those surrounding me.

    I've always wondered how middle-to-upper-class black kids responded to hip hop compared with poorer kids. I'm making the assumption that you grew up in predominantly-white suburban communities. Were there many other black kids around when you were growing up? Was being black, growing up, a relevant part of your life?

    People are now making ish that doesn't even qualify as commercial now, just as 'retarded' - which is apparently a cool new trend (Go DUMB!). Is hip hop the love of my life? Maybe, but I think the bitch is cheating on me.

    I'm keepin' it real! Real dumb!!

    [image=http://slapnose.com/images/blog/1204/1204_chris_rock_255x339.jpg]


    But I'd like to see if I could earn a decent living defending hospitals from lawsuits. Something to consider.

    I just want you to know that I teared up a bit when I read this. There's hope for the future yet! :)

    It's a logical step to becoming a politician, which is my ultimate goal. Politics is everything everywhere, and it's more than something to be abused, as people are so eager to point out. It's also the very fabric of our society. It's somewhere where everything can be influenced for the better or for the worse, and I'd like to think that I can push it towards the former.

    Go you!! =D=


    4. If you could only accomplish one thing, that would be on your list of "things to do, before you die" list, what would it be? Why would you choose it, and what would it mean to you to actually accomplish it?

    but in terms of things that I personally see as a problem, it would be a bill regulating all scientific forays into human genetics, with the goal in mind being restriction of practices that needlessly alter the integrity of the constitution of the human race. Things designed to artificially cause someone to be a superathlete, or to control someone's mind, or to clone a human being, would be restricted.

    Mind if I ask you to expound on that? I'm really curious what the basis of your feelings on the matter are.

    I guess the perfect woman would have a perfect body but be sadly unaware of it(stuck up **es FTL), would be around my level of intelligence but would never be quite certain whether she was smarter than me or not(and thus always challenge me), interesting in a conversation, subtle, and would share my musical tastes and maybe even abilities.

    One of the things that always surprises me about you, Femi, is how remarkably mature you are. I often forget you're still a second-class citizen worthy of constant derision (i.e. a teenager) :p. "Perfect body" aside, you really seem to realize that there's a heck of a lot more to a woman than that. Good for you.

    I never really found comic books compelling, maybe I didn't give them a good enough chance...

    Remember all that good stuff I said about you above? Yeah...never mind. [face_plain]


    :p

  4. Suzuki_Akira Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    May 13, 2003
    star 7
    Now that's interesting! I did not know that about you! :) I have to admit that my knowledge of Japanimation is about as good as my knowledge of the post-RotJ EU--i.e. I know that it exists but it could be a myth for all I know--but I think it's cool that you got into that stuff as a kid!

    Yeah, well 95% of anime that gets over here is garbage, so it's hardly worth all the Japanese jokes I keep getting :p. I should change my username to Olu Dara.

    I've always wondered how middle-to-upper-class black kids responded to hip hop compared with poorer kids. I'm making the assumption that you grew up in predominantly-white suburban communities. Were there many other black kids around when you were growing up? Was being black, growing up, a relevant part of your life?

    That assumption would be correct. There were a few other black kids, no more than a dozen at any point in elementary or middle school I went to until I got to the freshman high school, and that's only because there were damn near a thousand kids - and even then, it was something like two dozen. What few black kids there were were of no help to me, because I respected them about as much as the white kids who insisted that I wasn't black because I used 'big words' and read really well, and the Nelly and 50 Cent videos they watched after school showed neither(funny how hip hop had both a positive and negative affect on me, eh). Because a lot of the other black kids bought into it - they wore do rags, talked with fake ass ghetto slang and wore the popular clothing styles, because that made you black and thus it made you cool. I didn't have to be an adult to know that that type of fake **** is disgusting. If I heard one more 'gangsta' comment from a kid with a pool in his backyard, I was liable to turn violent.

    Apparently this stuff started way earlier than my parents had known, because at my younger ages I was violent towards other kids. No one could figure out what the hell I was angry about, until one day I drank from the water fountain and a kid behind me told people not to drink from it because 'African boy' had. I remember that vaguely, but not my response - apparently, I knocked him the **** out. Go figure.

    I just want you to know that I teared up a bit when I read this. There's hope for the future yet! :)

    I like to think so. I worry about so many things in the future, some on a personal level, some on a global level...I don't think I could carry on without hope that there'll be something worthwhile at the end.

    Mind if I ask you to expound on that? I'm really curious what the basis of your feelings on the matter are.

    My political disagreement with these things is that any genetic improvements will inevitably widen the barely manageable disparity of rich and poor, and irreparably so. How does one move up the socioeconomic ladder if people you're competing with aren't born better than you by societal convention but by mental and physical reality? My moral objection is that it cheapens the struggles of each individual human to improve themselves with limited means, because it makes those means effectively unlimited. The line is a shady one - if someone has a weak arm, should he get a bionic one just like an amputee? It isn't necessary a religious thing, but on some level the altering of humans just smacks of a profanation against...against what? God? Nature? You can quibble about which but the effect is the same. If we use scientific means to alter our basic selves we have become something other than human, and despite our evil there is beauty in humanity. There is beauty because God made us in his image. If that makes me a romantic, whatever.

    One of the things that always surprises me about you, Femi, is how remarkably mature you are. I often forget you're still a second-class citizen worthy of constant derision (i.e. a teenager) :p. "Perfect body" aside, you really seem to realize that there's a heck of a lot more to a woman than that. Good for you.

    It's probably
  5. Souderwan Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Jun 3, 2005
    star 6
    That assumption would be correct. There were a few other black kids, no more than a dozen at any point in elementary or middle school I went to until I got to the freshman high school, and that's only because there were damn near a thousand kids - and even then, it was something like two dozen. What few black kids there were were of no help to me, because I respected them about as much as the white kids who insisted that I wasn't black because I used 'big words' and read really well, and the Nelly and 50 Cent videos they watched after school showed neither(funny how hip hop had both a positive and negative affect on me, eh). Because a lot of the other black kids bought into it - they wore do rags, talked with fake ass ghetto slang and wore the popular clothing styles, because that made you black and thus it made you cool. I didn't have to be an adult to know that that type of fake **** is disgusting. If I heard one more 'gangsta' comment from a kid with a pool in his backyard, I was liable to turn violent.

    Yeah. I dealt with that a bit when I went to Geortia Tech. It's funny, because GaTech is in Atlanta, which is a pretty diverse city. But somehow the campus was it's own little city of idiocy. We had a whole bunch of good-ole Southern boys who didn't much like smart black kids and we had a whole bunch of black kids from all over who seemed to think that to fit in, they had to pretend like they were "hard". That whole experience was a real eye-opener for me.

    Apparently this stuff started way earlier than my parents had known, because at my younger ages I was violent towards other kids. No one could figure out what the hell I was angry about, until one day I drank from the water fountain and a kid behind me told people not to drink from it because 'African boy' had. I remember that vaguely, but not my response - apparently, I knocked him the **** out. Go figure.

    I can understand that. I've learned to channel that anger, however, into something useful. Rather than let people and their ignorance get to me, I've learned to just be myself and hope that they learn from that. I've had some amazing experiences as a result. I once spent a whole night talking to a Neo-nazi kid about race relations (after he had tried unsuccessfully to kick my ass). We both grew from that.

    My political disagreement with these things is that any genetic improvements will inevitably widen the barely manageable disparity of rich and poor, and irreparably so. How does one move up the socioeconomic ladder if people you're competing with aren't born better than you by societal convention but by mental and physical reality?

    Yeah, I hear you. But let me play devil's advocate for a second. If we widen that disparity as a result of genetic engineering, will not that process eventually grow cheaper and eventually available to everyone? Yes, the rich will be much richer than the poor, but will not the poor be richer than they are now?

    My moral objection is that it cheapens the struggles of each individual human to improve themselves with limited means, because it makes those means effectively unlimited. The line is a shady one - if someone has a weak arm, should he get a bionic one just like an amputee? It isn't necessary a religious thing, but on some level the altering of humans just smacks of a profanation against...against what? God? Nature? You can quibble about which but the effect is the same. If we use scientific means to alter our basic selves we have become something other than human, and despite our evil there is beauty in humanity. There is beauty because God made us in his image. If that makes me a romantic, whatever.

    Believe it or not, I agree with this more than I don't. I happen to believe that it is our stuggle that defines us. The journey is far greater than the destination. That being said, if we remove the weaknesses that we know of, I do not believe that this will make us unlimited. The truth is that we will always push ourselves to the limits of our potential. Genetic altera
  6. starwarsagent Jedi Youngling

    Member Since:
    Jul 4, 2004
    star 5
    Oh? he didn't find comic books compelling? i'm taking some points for that..but I agree with the whole hip hop music state..it's getting really annoying..it's racist and overplayed..other than that..again..not funny..but informative and true to his personality...I'm not so sure he should go into law..but hey.
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