We're In This Together Now - NIN: Musical Revolution or Just Plain Angry

Discussion in 'Archive: The Amphitheatre' started by Lord Bane, Jul 15, 2002.

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  1. Lord Bane Manager Emeritus

    Member Since:
    May 26, 1999
    star 5
    I hope you think long and hard about this.

    Nine Inch Nails, fronted, organized and basically just Trent Reznor & Studio Toys, has seen itself rise from earlu 90s hard rock/industrial to become one of the forerunners of the alternative genre (and that is a broad term - basically, he's anti-pop & Rock & Roll). But has NIN's hard edge really accomplished anything? Are Reznor's lyrics angry hate messages and whinings or desperate attempts at balancing a messed up life, an outlet for all the problems of his world?

    I would argue the latter, simpley because of the song "We're in this together", the tragic love song from the recent album, The Fragile.

    You and me,
    We're in this together now,
    None of them can stop us now,
    We will make it through somehow.

    You and me,
    If the world should break in two,
    Until the very end of me,
    Until the very end of you.

    Now, that's just the main chorus, but I listen to the voice behind them and the musical swells and cannot ignore the fact that something deeper lives in those words. And I see that more and more in many of his songs: sharp social commentary, musical retorts to wrongs against him (Star****ers, Inc. as a retort to Marylin Manson's career, built by Reznor who was then ignored by the self-appointed anti-Christ), the aforementioned theme of tragic love, coping with emotional pain and release.

    Yes, these are common themes, but the way everything is woven together, I see much more in NIN's music than anyone else who claims to be a peer in his genre (save Tool, of course).

    Now you have your say.
  2. BYOB_Kenobi Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Dec 7, 2000
    star 5
    "...has seen itself rise from early 90s hard rock/industrial..."

    Late 80s, as a matter of fact.
  3. DarthNut Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Aug 1, 1999
    star 6
    well, they're allright, but really who have the influenced? I don't see them as influencing many artists, I the late 90's, though correct me if I'm wrong.

    DarthNut,
    the nuttiest guy around.
  4. Hatter Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Apr 16, 2001
    star 4
    Uh, wasn't Manson in the video for "Star****ers, Inc."? If it was a criticism against him, I doubt he'd have a part in the video.
  5. Radiohead Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Mar 31, 2002
    star 4
    Did they cause a "Musical Revolution"? Not quite. They didn't create anything particularly new or innovative. And they certainly wouldn't rank high in a list of the best or most influential bands ever. In fact, I think they just rode the wave of grunge and heavy metal bands that were trendy in the early 1990s. But are they "Just Plain Angry"? Perhaps. Reznor's lyrics certainly seem suggest that he is. Nevertheless, the guy has potential to write more meaningful lyrics. Will he? I doubt it.
  6. pkloa Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    May 8, 2002
    star 4
    reznor was very influential for bringing the whole angst rock genre to the world. with the debut album, pretty hate machine, he made mainstream what was previously only underground. the electronica, metal, and rap elements opened the public's eyes to the possibility of more than just hair bands and mettalica.
    with the second album, broken, NIN further explored their hatred of everything around them. this is the album i like least, purely because of the lack of "art music". it did, however, help to pave new ground with modern speed metal.
    the third album, the downward spiral, was IMO reznor's attempt to explain how everything is messed up with his life. the anger and hopelessness is something most teenagers/young adults can relate to. this has been NIN's most popular album, partly because of the single "closer". for those that don't know, that is the proper title of the "F*** you like an animal song". this song revealed reznor's lack of important emotions. it was further explained in the song "reptile". in this song, he described a woman as being evil just under her beauty. this album, and the violent tour that followed, gave new hope to the rock scene after the suicide of nirvana frontman, kurt cobain. it also made the then unknown band, marilyn manson, a common name among mtv watchers.
    the most recent NIN album, the fragile, was the most artistic release by NIN. it had less anger and more emotion than any other. the critics and general public hated it. i loved it. there were extended instrumentals, haunted love stories, and even a put down on marilyn manson. that's right, "Star****ers, inc." was an insult. for the video, either manson learned the error in his ways, made up with reznor, or loved money too much, because that was him.
    as for reznor's ever difficult situation with women. the song "we're in this together now" was saying he now could love someone again. immediately after that song, "the fragile" shows us who it is. he tells us how sad the girl is, how he feels sorry for her, and how he won't let her hurt herself like he hurt himself. reportedly, a part where he mutters imperceptibly, he says her name. i have never heard it personally, but my friend says it's sophia or maria, etc.
    this album, while not influencial to other bands, does mark a turning point in reznor's mental state. maybe it is a maturity reached in music and real life. maybe we will find out when the side project, "tapeworm" finally releases something.
  7. Lord Bane Manager Emeritus

    Member Since:
    May 26, 1999
    star 5
    I'd say they're an influence, but we'd have to get together all the bands in his genre and question them to find out.

    Just because a band influences a lot of people, doesn't mean they're a good band. Metallica is a prime example of this. [face_plain]
  8. dustchick Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Aug 12, 2000
    star 1
    NIN = my favorite band

    I'm not a particularly angry, angst-ridden person, but both the music and lyrics touch me deeply. And I'm sure NIN is reaching a lot of young musicians, but our radiowaves are inundated by the packaged boybands and Britneys of the world. NIN doesn't even get the airplay it deserves, although I must admit that "The Fragile" wasn't a radio-friendly album. Great album, though. I just hope another album comes out someday.
  9. Lord Bane Manager Emeritus

    Member Since:
    May 26, 1999
    star 5
    It took him 6yrs to get the Fragile out. But we have a live album out right now, and Things Falling Apart I hear is a good CD of reworked songs...
  10. chibiangi Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Jun 16, 2002
    star 4
    If you like NIN, you should like Joy Division if you don't already.
  11. Radiohead Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Mar 31, 2002
    star 4
    Just because a band influences a lot of people, doesn't mean they're a good band. Metallica is a prime example of this.

    I disagree. I think the fact that a certain band or artist influences lots of other bands or artists is a tell-tale sign of a good band. I think that comment is just musical taste speaking.

    Personally, I could care less for Metallica, but I will admit that they have influenced many bands. Of course, they have a love-hate relationship with fans of their genre. But, the simple fact that others seek to emulate what they have done speaks volumes about their talent.
  12. Lord Bane Manager Emeritus

    Member Since:
    May 26, 1999
    star 5
    I'd say it speaks volumes about the image, not the sound. The sound is generic and easy to replicate, but the image brings that sort of rebellious, devil-may-care attitude that some kids desire.
  13. Radiohead Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Mar 31, 2002
    star 4
    I'd say it speaks volumes about the image, not the sound. The sound is generic and easy to replicate, but the image brings that sort of rebellious, devil-may-care attitude that some kids desire.

    I think this comment criticizes the bands that Metallica has influenced, rather than Metallica itself (at least I think that's what your pointing to). And when judging Metallica (who, again, I could care less for), I think it's important to factor in what came before them. Did anything sound remotely similar as them? Perhaps, but the way in which they put themselves out there has to be given some credit. Sure, image is a factor, but Metallica did it with their sound first and influenced tons of bands since--for better or for worse.
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