Amph What book are you reading right now?

Discussion in 'Community' started by droideka27, Aug 31, 2005.

  1. Sarge Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Oct 4, 1998
    star 4
    Last Stand of the Tin Can Sailors, James Hornfischer's account of WW2's Battle of Leyte Gulf, focusing primarily on the Americans who sailed 2,000 ton destroyers against Japan's 70,000 ton battleships. I'm about half through it now, and so far it has been detailed, personal, inspirational, horrifying, glorious, and heartbreaking.
    Last edited by Sarge, Apr 11, 2014
  2. Kenneth Morgan Chosen One

    Member Since:
    May 27, 1999
    star 4
    Just finished "Shep's Army" by Jean Shepherd. Starting "Kenobi" by John Jackson Miller.
  3. LAJ_FETT Tech Admin and Collecting/Games Mod

    Administrator
    Member Since:
    May 25, 2002
    star 9
    I was a great Jean Shepherd fan as a kid. Enjoyed his radio show and I still have a few of his books.
  4. SWpants Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Oct 28, 2004
    star 4
    Almost done with Quinlan Vos Omnibus
    Force Smuggler likes this.
  5. I Are The Internets Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Nov 20, 2012
    star 7
  6. OdRevus Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    May 16, 2008
    star 1
    [IMG]
    So the kids in the GoT thread will stop being such bullies.

    Plus I've been wanting to for quite some time.
    YodaKenobi likes this.
  7. Cushing's Admirer Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Jun 8, 2006
    star 7
    A Tale of Two Cities.
    Saintheart likes this.
  8. Sarge Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Oct 4, 1998
    star 4
    Just finished Last Call for HMS Edinburgh, history of Royal Navy cruiser on the Russian convoy route during WW2. Pretty good, but not as good as Alistair MacLean's novel HMS Ulysses.
  9. VadersLaMent Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Apr 3, 2002
    star 9
    Finished of the Ethshar novel Night Of Madness. It's not bad but is certainly the least of the Ethshar books I have read. And now I turn to an old friend.

    [IMG]


    The Companions R.A. Salvatore.
  10. SWpants Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Oct 28, 2004
    star 4
    Dead Ever After by Charlaine Harris.

    The last Sookie Stackhouse book is turning out to be one of the best. The quality had been decreasing for quite some time.
  11. Saintheart Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Dec 16, 2000
    star 6
    I'm on the verge of abandoning The House of the Seven Gables, but I might give it a couple more pages.

    However, I can recommend a non-fiction(ish) book I read in between gouging eyes out on Nathaniel Hawthorne, which was impressive enough for me to blow through its 400 pages in roughly 4 total hours:

    [IMG]

    Basically, this is the account of Ross Perot's clandestine mission into very-late-and-immediately-post-Shah Iran of 1979 to get two of his employees out of jail. I've not read any Follett to date, although I've got The Pillars of the Earth sitting on my to-read list. However, I've seen enough bits and pieces of The Man From St. Petersberg in other works to form the impression that Follett's firmly cut from the Bestselling Eighties Cold War Novelist mould.

    That aside, it's a cracking good read, possibly because the flow of events has a natural pacing to it that puts most fictional bestsellers to shame. As to its historical accuracy, Follett stakes his integrity on this book, and stands by it as a true version of what took place. His research looks to have been extensive. He appends the end of a relevant court decision relating to the subject of the book to buttress this, and reading through the acknowledgments section one can see he's spoken to every medium to major player in the book that he describes events around -- the only real exceptions being former President Jimmy Carter, the Ayatollah Khomeini, and the Iranian magistrate who locked up Perot's two employees to begin with. That is, he cites Iranian government sources as well and gives them their side as well. Is it meant as a historical text? No, not exactly, but I've yet to see a historical text that doesn't have a bias one way or the other either. And unlike, say, your average Michael Moore "book", I've seen little competing material to say it's in any real way historically inaccurate other than from a single biased website whose "reviewer" had not actually read the book. It's well-written and solid, and it's heartily recommended for a book where truth is indeed stranger than fiction.
    Last edited by Saintheart, Apr 19, 2014
  12. SWpants Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Oct 28, 2004
    star 4
    Wielding a Red Sword by Piers Anthony
  13. anakinfansince1983 Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Mar 4, 2011
    star 8
  14. I Are The Internets Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Nov 20, 2012
    star 7
    You could've found that screencap anywhere!
    OdRevus likes this.
  15. emilsson Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Oct 5, 1998
    star 6
    I'm just about to finish Mary Doria Russell's The Sparrow and then I intend to start the sequel Children of God. I've read The Sparrow before but I had forgotten what a wonderful novel it is, telling the story of the discovery of a new civilisation on a distant planet. Above all, it's about the impact the existence of life on other planets would have on faith.
  16. NYCitygurl NSWFF Manager

    Manager
    Member Since:
    Jul 20, 2002
    star 9
    I've been wanting to read that!

    @Saintheart I haven't read that one, but I enjoyed Pillars of the Earth.
  17. King_of_Red_Lions Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Mar 28, 2003
    star 3
    Raising Steam by Terry Pratchett

    The new Discworld novel.
  18. SWpants Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Oct 28, 2004
    star 4

    So far, it's started out more interesting than the 2nd & 3rd ones. Those dragged for the first 50 pages or so, or at least until the link to the first novel set in. In this one, War was pretty interesting from the start.
    NYCitygurl likes this.
  19. cbagmjg Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Jul 12, 2006
    star 3
  20. duende Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Apr 28, 2006
    star 5
    [IMG]

    it's the coffee-table variety, but it's still a book!
    slightly_unhinged likes this.
  21. Havac Former Moderator

    Member Since:
    Sep 29, 2005
    star 7
    Lafayette, by Harlow Giles Unger. I was looking for a biography of Lafayette, who's a fascinating figure, and this was one of the best recent offerings; the pickings are disappointingly slim. Unger is a bit of a Lafayette fanboy at times, but that doesn't stop him from offering substantial criticism where relevant. I also wouldn't have argued with the book being a bit longer. But overall, it's a pretty good biography, presenting a thorough recounting of Lafayette's remarkable life as a pivotal figure in the American and French Revolutions. Not a great biography, but quite serviceable for anyone interested in the subject.
  22. V-2 Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Dec 10, 2012
    star 4
    I recently read Frank Miller's Holy Terror.

    [IMG]

    Bag o' *****.

    Avoid.

    Ramza Edit: Have to star that out. But I agree.
    Last edited by Ramza, Apr 21, 2014
  23. Darth_Furio Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Apr 17, 2008
    star 7
    Star Wars: The Old Republic: Annihilation
  24. Force Smuggler Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Sep 2, 2012
    star 6
    What does everyone think of the Divergent trilogy by Veronica Roth? I'm on Insurgent and like the books so far.
  25. Drac39 Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Jul 9, 2002
    star 6
    'A Feast for Crows', very different from the predecessors. I don't know if I am enjoying it as much but I still have a bit before I get the whole feel for it.