PT What do people have against darth vader building c3po?

Discussion in 'Prequel Trilogy' started by Lord Tyrannus, Oct 26, 2012.

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  1. rumsmuggler Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Aug 31, 2000
    star 7
    A nine year old boy didn't build his droid brain, program him and install six million languages into him. He just found the parts and rebuilt him. Go to wookieepedia and look it up.
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  2. Iron_lord Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Sep 2, 2012
    star 6
    In RoTS (flashback scene) Anakin, when giving 3PO to Padme, says "I probably shouldn't have given him quite so much self-awareness- he's a worrier".
  3. Arawn_Fenn Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Jul 2, 2004
    star 7
    No, he did all of that. He even smelted the ore and machined all the components himself!
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  4. rumsmuggler Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Aug 31, 2000
    star 7
    I haven't read rots in a while, but adding some tweaks isn't the same as doing a full programing
  5. Iron_lord Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Sep 2, 2012
    star 6
    True. But it's still moderately impressive.
  6. rumsmuggler Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Aug 31, 2000
    star 7
  7. Iron_lord Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Sep 2, 2012
    star 6
    I liked the way RoTS novel handled it- Anakin's "I'm not really giving him to you- I'm asking you to look after him. He's not just a droid- he's a friend."

    And Padme's echoing this when giving him Artoo after his graduation to Jedi Knight.
  8. Sistros Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Jul 24, 2010
    star 6
    I suppose my original point was to the casual viewer it looks as if Anakin had built C-3PO from scratch

    also said casual viewer wouldn't bother looking at third parties to look for the real answer, in this case: most people wouldn't know about the wook :p
  9. StampidHD280pro Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Jul 28, 2005
    star 4
    This is really the point of C-3PO. I don't think 3-PO was only a way to tie the trilogies together.

    The two droids represent our worrisome, deliberate side and our whimsical, intuitive side. As well as Anakin's. While 3PO is built and abandoned by Anakin quite deliberately, Anakin gains R2 through an accidental set of heroic events.

    And it's pretty obvious that like Anakin's pod, 3PO was made from parts from the junk store we found Anakin in. I'm not sure what "from scratch" would even mean. Anakin's personal droid factory?
  10. Sistros Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Jul 24, 2010
    star 6
    ok, so Anakin didn't build C-3PO

    case closed..

    (he either did or he didn't afterall)
  11. TOSCHESTATION Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Jan 17, 2003
    star 4
    Either way, it's yet another example of the "Incredible Shrinking Universe" factor that's been a hallmark of the Star Wars series ever since TESB/ROTJ......
    Last edited by TOSCHESTATION, Oct 29, 2012
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  12. Sistros Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Jul 24, 2010
    star 6
  13. Lars_Muul Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Oct 2, 2000
    star 6
    I just don't see this shrinking universe that everyone's been talking about. So Vader turned out to be Luke's father, Leia turned out to be his sister, Artoo came from their mother's royal court and Threepio was built by their father.
    All this means is that their family is bound together by fate - and that the droids are part of the family.
    This got me thinking: When Luke says "What a piece of junk", he has no idea just how much junk is standing right next to him, hidden behind a shiny set of gold coverings. It strengthens the point that you should never judge a book by its cover. "He may look luxurious, kid, but underneath that shiny surface, he's just another piece of junk".
    Also, just how sincere was Padmé when she said "He's perfect"? It's already been pointed out, many times, how similar she and Luke are in their attitudes... ;)





    Threepio - rotten to the core
    /LM
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  14. sinkie Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    May 27, 2004
    star 1
    I think part of the way to see each other's perspectives here is to tweak what you just said above:

    "This got me thinking: When Lucas writes "What a piece of junk", he has no idea just how much junk is standing right next to him, hidden behind a shiny set of gold coverings."

    Not at all what you meant, but when I misread what you wrote I thought, a-ha! See, that's what it comes down to! All those connections weren't there, they weren't even in Lucas's mind at the time, and this probably comes through to those of us who experienced the OT as a much more "open ended" universe and story. Everything was loaded with potential, until a great portion of it, especially the more up-front aspects, got nailed down to one absolute way of reading them. So we no longer wonder what the droids were up to before they came into Luke's possession. We know. We no longer wonder who and what Boba Fett is. We know. We no longer wonder what Chewie was up to pre-OT. We know (or at least we know a pretty significant detail...not to mention he was also hanging out with another character whose backstory was similarly vague and intriguing...so a sort of double-whammy). We no longer wonder what the Clone Wars were....we know big time! The intimate connections of all these characters and story-threads, by definition, shrinks the possibilities. The circle is much smaller than we once thought it was. And such shrinking can come across as too easy, less realistic and therefore less mature or thoughtful or subtle to some people's tastes. If, and to me it is a big "if", Lucas actually had all of these connections in mind when he wrote what would be called ANH back in the day, then I feel fortunate to have been able to experience Star Wars differently then, where I was given the false impression that the universe was an open and vast and realistic place that I could let my imagination strut its stuff! That to me was a huge part of the artistry of the films and Lucas's talent at the time.

    (and as I have said before, I'm the kind of guy who even had issues, at age 12 seeing ROTJ in the theaters during its initial run, with Leia being Luke's sister! That bugged me for years. Even at that age it felt way too easy!)
    Last edited by sinkie, Oct 30, 2012
  15. Lars_Muul Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Oct 2, 2000
    star 6
    I see what you're saying, but I believe that this feeling that the galaxy seems smaller has more to do with the fact that the PT spends a lot of time in the civilized parts of the galaxy - places that were hinted at but never shown in the OT. It also shows us events that we used to fantasize about, like humongous battles and epic duels the likes of which just couldn't have been achieved back in the day. After having seen the PT, I feel like I've seen it all. The sense of mystery that the OT used to create by only giving us a glimpse of the GFFA is now long gone. I do miss that at times, but I'm more than happy with what I got out of the PT.





    Times change
    /LM
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  16. ezekiel22x Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Aug 9, 2002
    star 4
    There's more than one route to realism for me. I would agree that the newly revealed/revised connections of certain characters has reduced the scope of the fictional universe (or tightened the dramatic focus within that universe perhaps), demanding that the viewer accept a significantly higher degree of plot-building coincidence than that which was seen with parts IV-VI of the cycle. This has been a deal-breaker for many, and that is certainly their prerogative.

    But I have most often found that the greater plot and thematic elements built around or upon the in some ways reduced scope of the I-III narrative actually lend more of what I'd deem realism to the whole deal. So sure, the past adventures of Yoda and Chewie is indeed a bit of a really? in terms of strict world-building continuity, and yet the flawed Jedi order clinging to their outdated doctrine and in turn helping to pave their own way to Order 66 brought a level of honest ambiguity to the tale that IV-VI didn't quite manage on their own. So yeah, when Yoda departs in his E.T. scene and Chewie mournfully howls goodbye a part of me might still be questioning the world-building logic of putting them together, and yet a bigger part is experiencing not just the surface of the scene but the entirety of the narrative. And Yoda beginning his path to exile and saying goodbye to a friend in large part because of his order's own part in the greater strife is sadly realistic to me.
  17. rumsmuggler Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Aug 31, 2000
    star 7
    He rebuilt him. He wasn't the original maker. It ain't that hard to figure out folks.
    Billy_Dee_Binks likes this.
  18. Sistros Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Jul 24, 2010
    star 6
    not saying it is

    but from the film alone it looks as if he made him..

    ...not that hard to figure out folks...
  19. Lord Tyrannus Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Oct 18, 2012
    star 4
    How should C3PO have been in the prequels? Where do you think he should have come from, if not Vader? Should he have even been in it?
  20. Samnz Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Sep 4, 2012
    star 3
    That's the way I see it. We're following a very specific group of people in the movies and they're interconnected.
    The galaxy was already a "small place" in the OT when very imporant plans randomly fell into Luke's hand, who happend to be the brother of a princess he was about to rescue. Not enough, the bad guy happened to be their father and the Jedi who helped Luke was Vader's former teacher as well by sheer chance. Then it turned out that the only Jedi survivor used to be the Jedi who instructed Luke's mentor (Obi-Wan).
    So I don't think Anakin building C-3PO did any harm. If C-3PO belonged to Padmé like R2 - what would have changed?
  21. Lord Tyrannus Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Oct 18, 2012
    star 4
    Yeah. The droids were a family thing.

    Yoda did not train obi wan. Qui gon Jinn trained obi wan. Yoda just trained obi wan when obi wan was a youngling.
  22. Lars_Muul Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Oct 2, 2000
    star 6
    In other words, Yoda did train Obi-Wan.





    "That's no frog - It's a space midget!"
    /LM
  23. Chewbacca89 Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Oct 25, 2012
    star 5
    I think R2-D2 should have made C-3PO. He has a welder, after all...
  24. Lord Tyrannus Jedi Master

    Member Since:
    Oct 18, 2012
    star 4
    In other words, there's nothing suprising about Yoda training obi wan since all younglings were trained by Yoda. I was just responding to someone who made a comment than Yoda teaching obi wan made SW a small universe.
  25. the_sinister_hologram Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Nov 3, 2012
    star 2
    Wouldn't it be nice if the movies themselves made the effort of pointing things out? Rather than have novel writers come up with all sorts of excuses for everything in their books?
    When I'm going to see a movie, my impression of it will be based on what is shown on-screen. I will not buy ten thousand other books that come up with explanations for every flaw in the movie I've just seen.

    It is one of the reasons many were left with a sour taste after the PT.
    Who's that guy named Dooku? Why is he all of a sudden a villain? Where did he come from? Why is he doing this? Oh, it's explained in a book.
    Who is this General Greivous who is a robot, but has organic eyes? Why is he only now introduced to the audience? What's his backstory? Does he even have one? Oh, go read book X.
    That's just stupid.
    Last edited by the_sinister_hologram, Nov 6, 2012
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