Your List of the Top Instrumentalists...

Discussion in 'Archive: The Amphitheatre' started by JediUruviel, Oct 30, 2006.

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  1. CaptainBinaca Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Jul 15, 2005
    star 3
    I'll have to check that out, must be insane
  2. rumsmuggler Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Aug 31, 2000
    star 7
    I agree that Coltrane has more soul in his music, but I thought this about playing ability, and not about how much soul one has over the other.
  3. TheBoogieMan Manager Emeritus

    Member Since:
    Nov 14, 2001
    star 6
    And soul isn't part of playing ability?
  4. rumsmuggler Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Aug 31, 2000
    star 7
    Not technically, but I see where you are coming from though. Since I play saxopone, I have a different persceptive than most on the matter.

    One can be the best in actual playing ability and have no soul and it shows to anyone that see, hear, and feel it, while another may not be the best in ability and have more soul than anyone else and it shows. By your view of it, Coltrane is the best because he has soul, and I can agree with you on that standpoint.

    Since none of them are alive to determine which one of them is the best player in terms of technical ability alone(like scales, and making them play a prepared piece, put them both on a saxophone that isn't their trademark..) I guess we'll never know for sure. Taking soulful playing into account, I agree that Coltrane wins handsdown.
  5. TheBoogieMan Manager Emeritus

    Member Since:
    Nov 14, 2001
    star 6
    I play saxophone too.

    Well, I think that Coltrane and Bird were probably pretty much on par as far as the absolute technicalities go - you probably couldn't get either of them to outpace the other on scales - so that leaves us to find other ways to rank them.
  6. rumsmuggler Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Aug 31, 2000
    star 7
    Which saxophone(s) do you play?

    I can play them all, but Alto and Baritone are my favorites.


    I can't really think of anything else off the top of my head other than put Coltrane on Alto, and Parker on Tenor and see how well they can adapt. I've never heard of either one of them on any other saxophone other than the ones they are recorded on.


  7. TheBoogieMan Manager Emeritus

    Member Since:
    Nov 14, 2001
    star 6
    Well, considering that Coltrane played soprano a lot later in his career, I think he'd have an easier time adapting to alto than Parker to tenor.

    And I play tenor and soprano, although baritone is really my favourite. But I can't afford one. :p
  8. -G-O-A-T- Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Jul 18, 2005
    star 3
    I'm wondering if there is a distinction between soul and emotive qualities?

    Charlie Parker is a true original and innovator. His emotional expression is hard to deny on a song like 'Embraceable You,' but I can see where despite his amazing technique he can leave you unsatisfied.

    I've read that the limitations of recording to 3 minute sides in his day might have hindered Bird, where the technology that came after and allowed for longer recordings may have highlighted his abilities even more. We'll never know.

    However, I've got to say that when I hear Trane's "While My Lady Sleeps" I hear an artist engaging the full ebullient, expression of his completely mature abilities making a statement -- 'I have arrived.'

    I think the powerful matte-toned sound of Trane's instrument also contributes to the soulful character of his playing.


    Also for those who can look at it, here?s a link to a video of the aforementioned guitar trio performing Chick Corea?s composition Spain in a live setting. Fantastic!
  9. rumsmuggler Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Aug 31, 2000
    star 7
    Tenor and Soprano are both b flat instruments, while Alto and Baritone are e flat instruments, so Coltrane did an easy switch, other than getting your mouth used to a smaller mouthpiece. Switching between an Alto/Bari to a Soprano/Tenor is a bit tougher.
    I played clarinet( b flat instrument) for a year before I started playing alto sax. I had no problems switching between the saxes and my band teacher pretty much had me play all the saxophones over the years she taught me. I had the same band teacher from fifth grade, on up to high school, so she made sure I knew what I was doing. I've got plenty of medals and awards to show for it.
  10. Zaz Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Oct 11, 1998
    star 9
    I had no idea that there were so many different types of saxophones... :p
  11. rumsmuggler Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Aug 31, 2000
    star 7
    Those are the four main types. There are some weird and bizzare variants that I saw on wiki, but Alto, Tenor, Baritone, and Soprano are the one's worth knowing about.:)

    I haven't played in a year, I should get back into it sooner or later. Impress some ladies with my sax skills.:D
  12. Zaz Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Oct 11, 1998
    star 9
  13. rumsmuggler Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Aug 31, 2000
    star 7
    Yep..
  14. Zaz Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Oct 11, 1998
    star 9
  15. rumsmuggler Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Aug 31, 2000
    star 7
  16. YoungAngus Jedi Youngling

    Member Since:
    May 7, 2005
    star 5
    Yep.

    Paco plays at Yngwie speed...fingerpicking. :eek:

    Sorry for the late reply :p
  17. beaujolais2003 Jedi Youngling

    Member Since:
    Nov 8, 2006
    star 3
    He is/was also one of the most forward-thinking as well, not only as a pianist but also as a composer/arranger. His influence on modern-day "urban music" (for lack of a better descriptor) is undeniable.

    Though sometimes I question your commitment to Sparkle Motion, my dear aspiring young musical artist.
  18. Mariu Jedi Knight

    Member Since:
    Sep 2, 2006
    star 2
    Coloratra designates a style (florid singing), not necessarily a range. There are plenty of coloratura mezzi, for example: Marilyn Horne, Cecilia Bartoli, etc. I get the impression that the alto/tenor/soprano used in saxophone designate different ranges.
  19. -G-O-A-T- Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Jul 18, 2005
    star 3
    I first got into Herbie Hancock by listening to his well-known fusion album done with the Headhunters. It was very groovy stuff and easy to get into.

    Emboldened, by this experience, I soon thereafter picked up his album on Columbia entitled "A Jazz Collection" which was an assortment of his pre-fusion work containg standards, work with the group VSOP, and some of his own compositions.

    I have to admit that at the time, my listening skills being what they were, it was over my head, and subsequently didn't get much play. Alas it went into my big CD booklet to be neglected and forgotten for a while.

    I think at the time, my understanding of the piano as a lead instrument in jazz was underdeveloped, but as my ear became more advanced over time and finding most of the music I owned being played out, I found occasion to return to "A Jazz Collection."

    Probably one of the greatest musical experiences of my life was when I laid down closed my eyes and listened to the mammoth talent displayed in this collection of recordings. A true revelation! From the opening nine minutes expounding every sort of melodical and percussive improvisation on the well known simple melody "Liza" to the gorgeous, perfectly measured unfolding of Herbie's utterly beautiful compostions "The Eye of The Hurricane" and "Maiden Voyage" to close the album, it was pure bliss for my ears, mind and spirit. It was the expression of a true genius, and an artist that I credit with a great deal of my understanding and appreciation for this sublime instrument.


    This experience led me to conclude at that point that a great deal of music I had heard and even my own thinking regarding it to be obsolete. To this day, I thank this gifted artist for being a teacher and an inspiration to me.

    [image=http://img140.imageshack.us/img140/7006/herbiehancock3am1.jpg]
  20. rumsmuggler Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Aug 31, 2000
    star 7
    Yep..
  21. Zaz Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Oct 11, 1998
    star 9
    It *was* a joke, actually.
  22. rumsmuggler Chosen One

    Member Since:
    Aug 31, 2000
    star 7
  23. rogue_wookiee Jedi Youngling

    Member Since:
    Apr 24, 2004
    star 6
    I wanted to throw out another name for bass. Ryan Martinie of Mudvayne. The rest of the band is pretty average, but this guy is just as good a slap and pop bassist as Flea of the Chili Peppers.

    I'm trying to learn "Dig" on the bass right now and it's insane.
  24. Cobranaconda Force Ghost

    Member Since:
    Mar 3, 2004
    star 7
    Sitar: Ravi Shankar.

    Goes without saying really :p
  25. Zaz Jedi Grand Master

    Member Since:
    Oct 11, 1998
    star 9
    Certain instruments don't lend themselves to distinction, somehow...the tuba, for one.
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