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Youtube, the modern day seventh wonder of the world, the proverbial library at alexandria

Discussion in 'Archive: The Senate Floor' started by beezel26, Apr 14, 2007.

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  1. beezel26

    beezel26 Jedi Master star 7

    Registered:
    May 11, 2003
    what do you think. Youtube is a store house for videos from as far back as people can remember and listed so that people can view them as long as youtube is around. More importantly videos that would go lost forever due to lack of commercial interest are suddenly given a place to rest on a bookshelf so someone someday can view them.

    like the library at alexandria its a library of immense wealth of knowledge.

    some not so popular but nonetheless still useful.

    Think about it. losing youtube will be a loss of knowledge of our present day and past that the future generations can only guess at.

    the loss of library and even the knowledge of the roman people put Europe in the dark ages.

    No youtube isnt going away but the information stored is still useful to us and our future generations.


     
  2. dizfactor

    dizfactor Jedi Knight star 5

    Registered:
    Aug 12, 2002
    Don't we already have a YouTube thread?

    We could turn that one into a copyright thread and this one into a sociopolitical ramifications of digital archiving.
     
  3. Jabbadabbado

    Jabbadabbado Manager Emeritus star 7 VIP - Former Mod/RSA

    Registered:
    Mar 19, 1999
    I^m more impressed with wikipedia. 1.7 million articles in English, nearly 600k in German. Even if a significant percentage of it is useless, my feeling is that percentage is still relatively small. Relative to YouTube, I wouldn^t necessarily conclude that a video clip is worth a thousand words.
     
  4. beezel26

    beezel26 Jedi Master star 7

    Registered:
    May 11, 2003

    a video clip can have a powerful impact.

    Remember the tiananem square massacre, remember that one lone chinese soul who stood as the tanks pulled up.[link=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CdKgtIenuWI&mode=related&search=] the lone rebel [/link]

    Remember the march and massacre of kent state. [link=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gv4u5dIRouM] Kent State [/link]

    ever heard of the Sikh massacre in 1984 by the indian government. [link=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tOoARr9IqvY&NR=1] never forget84 [/link]

    Bloody Sunday in january 30, 1972. [link=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JFM7Ty1EEvs] Bloody Sunday [/link]

    dont tell me video clips are meaningless.
     
  5. Reecee

    Reecee Jedi Master star 3

    Registered:
    Feb 14, 2004
    Mm, but for everyone of those theres ten of Stargate: SG1 in Sockpuppets

    [link=http://youtube.com/watch?v=F6wbHPdnhfY][/link]

    or biggest burnout ever!!!!

    http://youtube.com/watch?v=UkNzL9PRBuM
     
  6. Lowbacca_1977

    Lowbacca_1977 Jedi Master star 6

    Registered:
    Jun 28, 2006
    I'd be more likely to consider archive.org for being the proverbial library at alexandria.
    Similar to how a library doesn't contain neccessarily the sources, but bodies of work.
     
  7. Ender Sai

    Ender Sai Chosen One star 10

    Registered:
    Feb 18, 2001
    Always thinking outside the square. :D

    It is pretty amazing though, when you consider how digital connectivity and storage capacity make traditional storage venues near obsolete.

    And how prescient William Gibson was...

    E_S
     
  8. Lowbacca_1977

    Lowbacca_1977 Jedi Master star 6

    Registered:
    Jun 28, 2006
    On the other hand, I think its interesting that how quickly its developing and changing is, in fact, one of the stronger points for traditional archiving methods.
     
  9. Rogue_Follower

    Rogue_Follower Manager Emeritus star 6 VIP - Former Mod/RSA

    Registered:
    Nov 12, 2003
    Additionally, digital media is fairly easy to manipulate or permanently erase. Sure, books can be burned too, but someone can scrub a hard-drive in about the same amount of time. I think one of the biggest advantages of digital storage formats is the volume of data they can store---a single 5cm USB drive can store the information contained within hundreds of books, or more.
     
  10. Jabbadabbado

    Jabbadabbado Manager Emeritus star 7 VIP - Former Mod/RSA

    Registered:
    Mar 19, 1999
    By the way, I didn't mean to devalue the importance of moving pictures in my last post. Video is the medium of our time, sure.

    An Achilles heel of the digital age I think is the fragility of digital storage. Books can last for a thousand years. Digital media breaks down, becomes obsolute. I have shoeboxes full of old floppy disks and no easy way to get to the data. Moving digital media out of legacy systems is a challenge. What percentage of the content on the Internet will never be permanently archived in a meaningful way? People are still uncovering lost archives of film stock from the silent era - and a lot of this stuff can still be preserved although different kinds of film stocks have their own catastrophic storage issues.

    Are we archiving our knowledge in a way that will make it accessible to future generations 50, 100, 200 years from now? I have doubts. It seems to me that much of our civilization's "content" is narrowly, vanishingly stuck in the present.
     
  11. Jediflyer

    Jediflyer Jedi Master star 5

    Registered:
    Dec 5, 2001
    On the flip side of the fragility of digital storage is the ease of copying. Huge amounts of information can be copied in seconds, switched to a different medium, or reencoded in a more up to date format.

    I would think that more copies + more mediums + more preservation through updated coding formats > fragility of digital coding formats + fragility of digital mediums.

     
  12. Jabbadabbado

    Jabbadabbado Manager Emeritus star 7 VIP - Former Mod/RSA

    Registered:
    Mar 19, 1999
    Maybe. This may be even more true taking into account the percentage of our text and video that will be totally useless and uninteresting to future generations. Information can be a kind of waste product of human civilization, not completely unlike used pampers in a landfill.
     
  13. Jediflyer

    Jediflyer Jedi Master star 5

    Registered:
    Dec 5, 2001
    But again, unlike non-digital information, digital information is extraordinarily easy to search through.

     
  14. Jabbadabbado

    Jabbadabbado Manager Emeritus star 7 VIP - Former Mod/RSA

    Registered:
    Mar 19, 1999
    The trend toward standardization of databases, xml, meta-data, etc., is truly an amazing continuing revolution. There's no downside to this process, except, again, the warning about the potential fragility and transience of the storage of all that data.
     
  15. KnightWriter

    KnightWriter Administrator Emeritus star 9 VIP - Former Mod/RSA

    Registered:
    Nov 6, 2001
    I agree with Jabba, and I saw this same concern reflected recently in an article about pictures. So much of what we have is digital, and some unforseen catastrophe could wipe out so much of what we take for granted, with no easy backup, or way to replace that which we depend on.
     
  16. Warsie

    Warsie Jedi Youngling star 2

    Registered:
    Oct 23, 2005
    Youtube+Wikipedia=badass

    Both are equally nice
     
  17. Hammurabi

    Hammurabi Jedi Master star 4

    Registered:
    Jan 14, 2007

    I can imagine, centuries from now, archaeologists rediscovering an old floppy drive will bear the significance of recovering the Rosetta Stone.
     
  18. GrandAdmiralJello

    GrandAdmiralJello Comms Admin ❉ Moderator Communitatis Litterarumque star 10 Staff Member Administrator

    Registered:
    Nov 28, 2000
    There was an article I read recently which cited the difficulty in--for instance--archiving the master copies of many digitally produced films. I believe it was linked on TFN news a while back, but essentially--copying does become a concern when we are talking about reproducing high-quality masters. A two hour film might be forty gigabytes as an uncompressed master film, and copying or encoding it would result in significant generation loss.

    I would argue that the Internet, as a whole, could possibly be equated to the Museion of Alexandria.
     
  19. Sauntaero

    Sauntaero Jedi Master star 4

    Registered:
    Jul 9, 2003
    The Library of Alexandria was not a wonder of the ancient world, at least when I was taught them.....

    Anyway, if copyright laws were remitted for youtube clips, then maybe, since although you can watch them you can't legally use them.
    But youtube does not chronicle the whole of present knowledge and understanding, wikipeda doesn't even, although its amount of information is addictive!
    Perhaps if there were two internets created...one for stupid youtube stuff and one for all sorts of valuable (free) learned stuff... maybe.... But that would be heaven on earth.
     
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