main
side
curve
  1. Welcome to the new boards! Details here!

Social "International Interview" Thread--All Are Welcome!

Discussion in 'FanForce Community' started by Pensivia, Jun 20, 2016.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Chyntuck

    Chyntuck Force Ghost star 5

    Registered:
    Jul 11, 2014
    As you can imagine, Barbarians is a poem that we Greeks have been quoting to each other A LOT over the past few years :p It's a very famous poem here, and people recognise it as easily as you'd recognise a famous Shakespeare quote. Every time we had elections since 2009 (that would be nine times!!!) the line "And now, what’s going to happen to us without barbarians? They were, those people, a kind of solution" came in very useful. I didn't expect we'd go international with it though, but hey, it's an opportunity for some cultural product placement, right?

    If you want to read some modern Greek literature, I highly recommend the Drifting Cities trilogy by Stratis Tsirkas. It's a series of novels that take place in Greek communities of the Middle East (Jerusalem, Cairo and Alexandria) during World War II that combines a very modern form of writing with motifs from Greek mythology and, even though it relies on aspects of recent history that aren't particularly well-known outside our borders, it's still very accessible as historical fiction. I haven't looked at the English translation because I'm sure I'd be disappointed by the fact that the element of Egyptian-Greek dialect is lost, but I'm told it's fine, and it's really a page-turner and a gripping story.
     
  2. Pensivia

    Pensivia Force Ghost star 5

    Registered:
    Apr 24, 2013
    I just love to hear about poetry being widely quoted...it doesn't happen here as much as one might hope:p

    And thanks for the the Drifting Cities recommendation. Will make a note of that for the future! (This thread makes for a great archive of interesting music, books, etc. to check out...just one reason out of many why I'm glad I started it:D)
     
    Dagobahsystem and Chyntuck like this.
  3. Gamiel

    Gamiel Chosen One star 8

    Registered:
    Dec 16, 2012
    What about something with the Ottomans in the 17th-centery

    [​IMG]
     
    Chyntuck likes this.
  4. Pensivia

    Pensivia Force Ghost star 5

    Registered:
    Apr 24, 2013
    Thread announcement: last call for any other questions and comments for Chyntuck...then we'll start DanielUK's round in a day or so!:D
     
    Chyntuck likes this.
  5. Pensivia

    Pensivia Force Ghost star 5

    Registered:
    Apr 24, 2013
    Hear ye, hear ye...it's time for our next round!

    Thanks again to Chyntuck and all of the participants in her round.=D==D==D=

    Next up will be DanielUK, who will start his round with his responses to the following questions provided by Chyntuck:

    1. If a member of the JCF were to come and visit your part of the UK (in the wider sense, you don't need to tell us exactly where you live of course!), what are the places, foods and elements of entertainment (theatres, music, museums, monuments, etc) that they should absolutely not miss?

    2. British humour is very popular in Greece (and probably everywhere else in the world), from Arsenic and Old Lace to the Monty Python to Mister Bean, but chances are that what reaches us only scratches the surface of everything you've got over there. Any favourites you'd like to mention that we're not likely to know? And why do you think that the UK developed this specific form of humour?

    3. In my country when we travel to the UK, we'll specify if we're travelling to England, Scotland, Northern Ireland or Wales (or even Cornwall) and we'll use the names "UK" or "Britain" only to refer to the overall political entity. As a Brit, how do you define "Britishness"? What is it that you see as the most important thing(s) that you have in common with people from the other nations forming your country, and what are the differences that you feel should be acknowledged to maintain the balance between the particular national identities that are subsumed under "British"?


    So let's welcome Daniel!

    [​IMG]
     
  6. DANNASUK

    DANNASUK Force Ghost star 7

    Registered:
    Nov 1, 2012
    HELLLLLO, INTERWEBZ!!

    LET'S GOOO!!

    [​IMG]

    1. If a member of the JCF were to come and visit your part of the UK (in the wider sense, you don't need to tell us exactly where you live of course!), what are the places, foods and elements of entertainment (theatres, music, museums, monuments, etc) that they should absolutely not miss?

    Ah, ol' Blighty. Canterbury, Kent to be 100% accurate. Home of the Church of England, Garden of England and Man of Kent (which is some old folklore myth, which is too complicated for me to even explain). If you do decide to venture to my realm, one must of course visit Canterbury Cathedral..

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Fun fact: I like to tell American tourists my uncle built the Cathedral in the 1960s (it was actually consecrated in 1070); the site was home to a Roman temple (to Jupiter?) before the Danes invaded and wrecked the place. Good ol' Dark Ages. Speaking of Romans..

    THE ROMAN MUSEUM! GO AND GO THERE NOW!

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Interesting note. I'm currently banned from entering after being drunk and attempting to pass myself off as a Roman Imperial Officer; I was complimented on my knowledge of Roman history, but my alcohol level was not. Those were fun memories. Still, it is a must to visit. But don't mention me. NEVER. I'm the Voldemort of that place.

    As I said, Kent is the Garden of England for a reason; Kentish countryside is the most beautiful thing you'll ever see (apart me in the person. I'm UBER pretty *flashes eyelids)

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Also, another place close and dear to my heart....Northern Ireland. We left, when I was young, due to the IRA. Ulster is always associated to violence and terrorism, but I want to show you her true face. It is a unique object of pure beauty. No jokes for this one, all seriousness. This is my childhood, this is my true home...

    Giant's Causeway (County Antrim)

    Legend says a giant built this, or something..

    [​IMG]

    All Saint's Church, Church of Ireland. Antrim Town
    Where a young DanielUK was Christened in 1987. 1 years old

    [​IMG]

    Antrim Castle
    The Tower is the only part left after a fire in the 1920s. This is where my Dad told my Mum he wanted to marry her; use to visit the ground with my cousins for picnics and games in the summer, before we had to return to England

    [​IMG]


    Next post will be question 2:
     
  7. DANNASUK

    DANNASUK Force Ghost star 7

    Registered:
    Nov 1, 2012
    2. British humour is very popular in Greece (and probably everywhere else in the world), from Arsenic and Old Lace to the Monty Python to Mister Bean, but chances are that what reaches us only scratches the surface of everything you've got over there. Any favourites you'd like to mention that we're not likely to know? And why do you think that the UK developed this specific form of humour?

    A unique and rare show, only had one series on BBC 3, and it was called The Smoking Room. Near perfect representation of the British workplace and is pure comedy gold.



    Have you guys ever heard of The Mighty Boosh? This is very specific unique form of British humour, that many of my American friends have honestly struggled to understand.



    Honourable mentions are Spittin' Image, Yes Minster and Yes Prime Minister, only Fools 'n' Horses and Dad's Army.

    I recall at school, when we first started learning about the works of Shakespeare did we begin to the notice British humour and what it truly is. This is very difficult to explain, but it is a mixture of sarcasm, puns and innuendos. If you ever posted in the PT Social Thread, you'll find many, many members struggle with my humour - some cannot tell if I am being serious or not. Ironically, I originally planned for this whole interview to be one huge joke but was genuinely worried people wouldn't get it lol

    Throughout history, even in dark moments like the Battle of Britain, we still never forget our sense of humour. It is something we pride ourselves on.

    I think the world, particularly the US, has finally began to understand our jokes and stopped trying to put their "spin" on it - i.e the US Office which really lost what made it unique.










    3. In my country when we travel to the UK, we'll specify if we're travelling to England, Scotland, Northern Ireland or Wales (or even Cornwall) and we'll use the names "UK" or "Britain" only to refer to the overall political entity. As a Brit, how do you define "Britishness"? What is it that you see as the most important thing(s) that you have in common with people from the other nations forming your country, and what are the differences that you feel should be acknowledged to maintain the balance between the particular national identities that are subsumed under "British"?

    Pour yourselves a stiff drink. This is about to get complicated very, very quickly. "Britain" consists of Scotland and England - Wales, legally speaking, is still considered apart of England (Wales is a principality); The United Kingdom is the country of Britain and province of Northern Ireland i.e official title is The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. There is only one true nation and that is Britain and the political entity is the United Kingdom.
    Makes sense? lol



    Culturally, Scotland is very different to England because it was never fully integrated unlike the Welsh (after being conquered in the 13th Century, Welsh identity was stamped out and replaced with the English way); Scotland has a separate legal system, which it maintained after the Act of Union in 1707 and many of its culture practices were partially tolerated by the English. Everyone else was politically and socially conquered. There are many regional differences, even at the county level, but it should not divert us away from the common principle: we're all British on these isles and should always remember that. If one region suffers, we all suffers.


    Our history is what bides us together; we've more greater together, than being separate; from Empire to World Wars and the social struggles at home, we are better off together fighting for the common good. It's who we are. And, in a way, it's what makes Britain great.
    I truly consider myself lucky to be born British.
     
  8. Gamiel

    Gamiel Chosen One star 8

    Registered:
    Dec 16, 2012
    [​IMG]
    "England later kicked all of their asses, but that's besides the joke.

    Scotland, Sweden, Norway, and Denmark share a lot of history, which is why they share a lot of words in their languages, and a lot of the old myths are the same as well.

    They also all did some things that the English considered rather feminine. Of course there's the kilt (which is even an old Scandinavian word) which the English confused with a skirt, and the vikings were obsessed with combing and braiding their hair, not to mention being clean. They washed their faces every day and their entire body once a week. Doesn't seem like much to us today, but to the English it was weird (Not that the vikings washed that often, but that they did it at all)."

    from https://satwcomic.com/trans-fear
     
  9. DANNASUK

    DANNASUK Force Ghost star 7

    Registered:
    Nov 1, 2012
    Speaking of kilts:

    Fun Fact - England is one of the few European regions not to have a national dress or day (St Georges Day is not a public holiday)
     
  10. Dagobahsystem

    Dagobahsystem Chosen One star 9

    Registered:
    Sep 25, 2015
    Just stopping by to say that I love this thread. I wish I could travel and see all of these beautiful countries being discussed in person. Maybe someday...

    Thank you for creating this thread Pensivia and thank you to ALL of the participants. Cheers!
     
  11. Gamiel

    Gamiel Chosen One star 8

    Registered:
    Dec 16, 2012
    Is it open for questions from us others now?
     
    Pensivia and Chyntuck like this.
  12. Chyntuck

    Chyntuck Force Ghost star 5

    Registered:
    Jul 11, 2014
    Gamiel I don't mean to step on Pensivia 's toes, but I'm not aware that there's a waiting period for people to ask questions -- there never was one in the past. And since I have a lot more questions and comments for Daniel, I suggest that we jump the shark and get started before Pensivia is back [face_devil]
     
    Pensivia, Gamiel and Dagobahsystem like this.
  13. Pensivia

    Pensivia Force Ghost star 5

    Registered:
    Apr 24, 2013
    Yes, Chyntuck is right...no one ever has to wait for me! I know Daniel is eagerly awaiting those follow-ups:D, and I will be jumping in as soon as I can too...


    So you may "fire" [comments and follow up questions] "when ready"!:p
     
    Chyntuck and Dagobahsystem like this.
  14. Gamiel

    Gamiel Chosen One star 8

    Registered:
    Dec 16, 2012
    Up here we import many TV-shows, movies, music, books and similar from GB. Beside USA, what countries do you import your pop-culture from?
     
  15. DANNASUK

    DANNASUK Force Ghost star 7

    Registered:
    Nov 1, 2012

    Japanese "punishment" comedy shows were very popular here along with anime and magna in late 90s to early 2000s; there is a uniqueness, which we find rather amusing and appealing to watch. K-pop and J-pop is popular(ish), too. But, the main influence is from India due to cultural and historical ties. Bollywood is VERY popular in the UK and I believe their equivalent to the Oscar is hosted here, too.

    Australian soap operas, such as Neighbours and Home & Away, are more or less apart of our cultural fabric. Majority of UK's immigrant population is from the Commonwealth, so their media is well represented in the UK.
     
  16. Gamiel

    Gamiel Chosen One star 8

    Registered:
    Dec 16, 2012
    Worst use of GB culture/history in fantasy or science-fiction that you know of?

    What underused part of GB culture/history would you like to see used in SF/fantasy?

     
    Chyntuck likes this.
  17. DANNASUK

    DANNASUK Force Ghost star 7

    Registered:
    Nov 1, 2012
    Ermmm, I don't know. Sorry


    The Civil War. So much potential and rich history to exploit.
     
  18. Chyntuck

    Chyntuck Force Ghost star 5

    Registered:
    Jul 11, 2014
    Gamiel DanielUK Have you two read Twenty Years After, the sequel to The Three Musketeers? It's historical fiction (not fantasy), but the Civil War is an important element of its plot and it's one of those brilliant swashbuckling novels that you just can't stop reading.

    (Daniel, I'll be back with questions and comments for you over the weekend -- for now I'll just say that I luuuuuve Yes Minister and Yes Prime Minister and that I squeed out loud when you mentioned them!)
     
    Gamiel and DanielUK like this.
  19. DANNASUK

    DANNASUK Force Ghost star 7

    Registered:
    Nov 1, 2012
  20. Gamiel

    Gamiel Chosen One star 8

    Registered:
    Dec 16, 2012
    Any special part/s of the Civil War that you would like to see used?
     
    Chyntuck likes this.
  21. DANNASUK

    DANNASUK Force Ghost star 7

    Registered:
    Nov 1, 2012

    Just after the execution of Charles I and the turbulence from Monarchy to Republic.
     
    Chyntuck and Gamiel like this.
  22. Gamiel

    Gamiel Chosen One star 8

    Registered:
    Dec 16, 2012
    As I said earlier: up here we import many TV-shows, movies, music, books and similar from GB, but is there some part/s of modern GB culture that you think should be exported but is not or to a too small degree?
     
    Chyntuck likes this.
  23. DANNASUK

    DANNASUK Force Ghost star 7

    Registered:
    Nov 1, 2012

    Erm, that's a very good question

    We're considered a cultural superpower, with London as the cultural capital of the world - and there is some truth to that. If we could export one thing, it would be something quite philosophical and what truly makes us who we are: inner independence. The belief in yourself, and who you are, and knowing society and the world will accept you. Recent growth and promotion of LGBT rights in society has had a huge cultural impact in the UK - the public happily embrace LGBT characters and accept same sex romance.

    Maybe out LGBT cultural revolution is our biggest export waiting to happen.

    (okay, I gave two things lol)
     
    Chyntuck likes this.
  24. Gamiel

    Gamiel Chosen One star 8

    Registered:
    Dec 16, 2012
    What comics do you read?

    What RPG:s are big around where you are?
     
  25. DANNASUK

    DANNASUK Force Ghost star 7

    Registered:
    Nov 1, 2012
    I don't really read comics, sorry.


    If you're referring to RPG's as in table tops, I wouldn't know. Was never my scene.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.