main
side
curve
  1. Welcome to the new boards! Details here!

Saga What History Will Say of Us (Dark ROTS AU, Padmé/Vader, Obi-Wan, one-shot)

Discussion in 'Fan Fiction- Before, Saga, and Beyond' started by AngelQueen, May 6, 2015.

  1. AngelQueen

    AngelQueen Jedi Master star 4

    Registered:
    Mar 1, 2001
    Title: What History Will Say of Us
    Author: AngelQueen
    Rating: PG-13
    Characters: Padmé Amidala, Darth Vader, Obi-Wan Kenobi
    Genre: Alternate universe, angst
    Summary: She can easily imagine what people would see if they were to look at her now. A symbol of oppression, of betrayal, a tyrant who acts without remorse. There is nothing for it.
    Disclaimer: Star Wars is the property of Lucasfilm and Disney. I make no claim on it and write this purely for entertainment purposes. No copyright infringement intended.
    Author's Note: This is the edited version of this story, as the original was a bit racey for the forums. If you're interested (and old enough), then you are free to view the unedited version on my AO3 profile, located here. Not that there's much difference, just a few paragraphs that were taken out here and there.



    She sits on a throne that more resembles an art piece than an actual, functioning chair. Delicate legs, coiled arms, latticed back. It is beautiful, it is elegant. Such is the way with the Naboo. Everything is meant to look beautiful, but it is also made to survive, to endure all that is thrown at it.
     
    It’s certainly more appealing than the monstrosity Palpatine set up during his… brief… tenure as Emperor.
     
    She can easily imagine what people would see if they were to look at her now. A symbol of oppression, of betrayal, a tyrant who acts without remorse. There is nothing for it. The Republic forsook its freedom in the previous administration, she has merely inherited the mess it created. If they do not see and appreciate the efforts she has made on their behalf, that is nothing to her.
     
    She does what is necessary.
     
    The door slides open without warning and a figure dressed in the deepest black strides into the room, bringing a cloud of menace and danger with him. She stiffens a little, but he takes no notice. He never does. Still, she forces herself to remain in control. To show weakness could get her killed.
     
    “You are leaving then, husband?” she asks, all emotion carefully concealed.
     
    He nods, brisk in his impatience to be gone. “Yes, my lady,” he replies. “The Hutts have proven… reluctant to implement the new anti-slavery laws you’ve instituted.” He stares up the dais at her, and she sees the fanatical expression in his eyes, full of yellow fire where there had once been clear, intense blue. “The Five-Oh-First will show them the errors of their ways.”
     
    She nods in response, and then stands and steps down the dais. This is a risk on her part, coming within his reach, but it isn’t as if he hasn’t proved able to harm her when she is beyond his physical touch. No doubt she will be scolded later, but it is a calculated gamble nonetheless. It is a dangerous game she plays in keeping her husband under control.
     
    He is practically vibrating with energy. He is eager for the battle, no, the slaughter that is to come. She has no illusions about his and his troops’ intentions. The Hutts will be brought to heel through fire and blood. The days of diplomacy are long gone.
     
    Yet, there is more to his zeal. His eyes rake her body, and she has no illusions as to the other origins of his excitement. Even in all the ways he has changed, he still desires her touch.
     
    To her, it is another method of control.
     
    She lets him pull her against his body, lets him kiss her, lets him rake his fingers, both those made of flesh and those made of metal, through her hair, shaking the pins out and letting them fall to the floor. When he pushes her against the wall, she doesn’t fight him, just lets him cover her in heated kisses.
     
    It is over quickly enough, thankfully. Her voice is steady when she speaks, showing no sign of their previous activities. “Go, my lord, and enlighten the Hutts to my… displeasure. Tell them the Empress desires freedom for all living beings in the galaxy, and if they wish to continue to live in good health, they will see the… merits of my position.”
     
    Her words are so bloodthirsty, so cruel, and yet he finds nothing wrong with them. He is oblivious to how different it was from the compassion she had espoused during the war and even before. It’s as though he doesn’t even notice how ridiculous this whole situation is. Instead, he sees only an excuse to vent his own blood rage on others, a justification for more violence and destruction.
     
    Who is this monster? Was he always like this and she was just too blind to see it?
     
    (“I killed them. I killed them all. Every single one of them. And not just the men, but the women… and the children too.”)
     
    She is blind no longer.
     
    He bows to her, all courtesy like a knight bidding farewell to his lady, before turning on his heel and striding out of the room. The door hisses shut behind him and she is alone.
     
    “That was unwise.”
     
    Or perhaps not.
     
    She doesn’t turn to face Obi-Wan, but then, she doesn’t need to. They’ve had this discussion before. “Which part?” she asks, mockingly irreverent. “Letting him go wreck havoc and murder the Hutts?”
     
    Obi-Wan doesn’t share her amusement of the situation. “Letting him touch you,” he replies. “You know how easily he can harm you, Padmé.”
     
    Oh, she does know. She has never forgotten how it felt to have invisible hands squeeze her throat, cutting off her ability to breathe. She has never forgotten the bewilderment, the panic that jolted her children into rolling in her womb in frantic protest.
     
    Still, she plays this game with him because she must. She has been able to bring him back under control.
     
    “You shouldn’t be here,” she says, changing the subject. It’s true. Obi-Wan is meant to be on Naboo, guarding her children. She had sent them there to protect them, and to protect herself. There is no room for sentiment or weakness in this world. She doesn’t dare present her love for her son and daughter to the world for her enemies to exploit, so she sent them away, to Naboo, where things are still clean and pure and beautiful. She sent Obi-Wan with them because of all of them, he’s the only one still in possession of his soul. Her husband sold his to keep her tied to him, and she sold hers to manage this mess that they’ve created.
     
    Her husband never even protested her decision to send the children away. It is her he has always wanted. The children, for all that he once called them a blessing, are afterthoughts at best. She didn’t bother to tell him that Obi-Wan was with them. It’s like he’s forgotten the older man, forgotten how they nearly came to blows when Obi-Wan Force pushed him to make him release the grip he’d had on her throat.
     
    He has her. That seems to be all he needs.
     
    “The children are fine,” Obi-Wan says, still behind her. “Ahsoka is with them.”
     
    She suppresses a flinch. Someone else she failed spectacularly. Now she is thankful that it is Obi-Wan here. She isn’t sure she’d be able to bear seeing Ahsoka, to be faced the consequences of her unintentional destruction of Ahsoka’s beloved Master. She can only hope that the Togruta girl can find some semblance of comfort in her Master’s children, even if, by the tenets of the Order she once belonged to, they should not exist.
     
    “Why are you here?” she asks. If nothing is wrong with the little ones…
     
    He doesn’t respond at first, and she takes his silence as an opportunity to turn around and return to her throne. As she seats herself, she at last lays her eyes on Obi-Wan.
     
    He’s grown older since she last saw him. It’s been nearly three years since that day, and she can see grey at his temples that wasn’t there before. Obi-Wan is by no means old - he hasn’t even seen his fiftieth life day - but his eyes speak of a man who has seen more than a dozen lifetimes full or more horrors than anyone can imagine.
     
    She wonders what he sees when he looks at her. A woman jaded and bitter from the loss of the way of life she’d devoted herself to? The siren who led his beloved apprentice and brother into the darkness? She isn’t sure she wants to know.
     
    “Organa has been trying to contact me,” Obi-Wan finally responds.
     
    Ah. She nods. That makes sense. Bail - another friend lost to her. He’s never forgiven her for accepting the blood-splattered throne her husband had presented to her. He’s never understood her reasons for taking up the mantle of Empress instead of seeking to restore the Republic. He’s refused to see that the Republic was dead, and had been so for some time.
     
    He doesn’t speak to her anymore, beyond what the duties an Imperial Senator owes to the Empress. He doesn’t ask after her health, doesn’t ask after her family, nothing. She keeps tabs on him, though. She knows that he and Breha have just recently adopted a baby girl. She’s seen the holos that have been released to the media - a chubby, delightful girl with a gloss of red curls. Mara, her name is. Mara Organa.
     
    She knows he and Mon Mothma and many of the other Senators of the Delegation of Two Thousand are still thick as thieves. She isn’t naïve enough to think that they’re all just chatting and taking tea together. Her agents are very good at what they do, and much more subtle than Palpatine’s cronies ever were.
     
    “He wants the backing of the Jedi for his movement,” she says aloud. “With Yoda having vanished into exile and any other survivors of Order Sixty-Six lying low, you’re his only other option.” Even though Obi-Wan had done so much to show that he was no longer involved in the wider events of the galaxy, having shown that his only interest is in the children of his former Padawan.
     
    She sighs and shakes her head. “I don’t remember him being so hasty,” she murmurs. “If only he’d been patient and trusted me.”
     
    Obi-Wan raises an eyebrow. “It’s been three years, Padmé,” he points out. “Look at it from his point of view.”
     
    She knows. Bail sees her enjoying the power that Palpatine wrested from the Senate and the people of the Republic, sees her encouraging her husband to drench himself in the blood of all those who oppose her. He sees nothing of what else she has been doing, of the little regulations and procedures that are slowly falling into place.
     
    “These things take time, Obi-Wan,” she replies, standing up again. She sweeps down the dais and toward the balcony that is just off the throne room. He follows her. “But it’s no matter,” she continues. “It’s time.”
     
    “For what?” he asks her, his voice laced with growing suspicion. Perhaps the Force is warning him of what is to come?
     
    She doesn’t answer him, merely looks out over the city. She can see her husband’s Star Destroyer rising into the air, making for the upper atmosphere. “I loved the Republic,” she says. “Loved it more than my own life, and even more than those I cherished closest in my heart.” She sighs, her eyes watching the ship rapidly grow smaller and smaller. “A part of me died that day, Obi-Wan,” she continues, knowing she need not explain which day she is referring to. “I had no desire to see the galaxy fall under a dictatorship, much less be the head of one.”
     
    “None of us did,” Obi-Wan says.
     
    She glances to her left, where he has come to stand. He is also looking up into the evening sky, his expression as sad as ever. She cannot even begin to imagine his own feelings, given what he has lost. His people, his brother, his very purpose for being. How does she say this without breaking him even more?
     
    “He had no faith in the system,” she finally tells him. “I knew that even before the war. I just never thought he would actually think it better to tear the entire system down rather than try and improve it. But this new one he has put into place is no better, is in fact worse.” She’s done as much as she can to limit and prevent the worst atrocities that the Empire would seek to mete out. Suggestions to all but enslave the Wookiees have been met with a cold reception from her, and the plans build that abomination Tarkin called ‘the ultimate method of control’ have been put on indefinite hold. That her husband never even protested the idea of enslaving an entire race alone shows her how much he has changed, how he is no longer the man she once believed him to be.
     
    “He’ll never let us restore the Republic, Obi-Wan,” she whispers, her eyes going back up to the sky. “Not as long as the Empire gives him free reign to do whatever he pleases. It must stop.”
     
    There are several moments of silence, and she can feel his eyes on her. She wonders if he is trying to read her with the Force, to discover what it is that she has been dancing around. Whatever it is that he does sense seems to alarm him. “How… What have you done, Padmé?”
     
    She closes her eyes and bows her head. “What is necessary.”
     
    It’s Obi-Wan’s strangled gasp that makes her open her eyes again and look up. A bright light has appeared, fiery even in the evening sky. An explosion, large and unforgiving. Then, as quickly as it appeared, it faded, leaving only a faint hint of the burning wreckage that is now lingering in orbit.
     
    It’s done. He is dead. She sacrificed much of the Five-Oh-First in the process, but she knows there was no hope for it. He’d never have gone without his personal troops, the men he trusted with his life.
     
    It had to be done, but that does nothing to negate the terrible pain blooming inside her. It does nothing to comfort Obi-Wan who has sunk to his knees, a single hand remaining on the balcony railing, holding on with a white-knuckle grip. She doesn’t reach out to him, somehow knowing that her comfort will not be welcomed.
     
    They stay side-by-side in silence, knowing that it will not last. Soon enough, people will start pouring into the throne room, full of questions and reports and looking to her for answers and leadership. As ever.
     
    “What now?” There is still a faint, hitching sob in Obi-Wan’s voice.
     
    She doesn’t hesitate. It’s what she has been planning for. “Now, the revolution begins.”
     
  2. taramidala

    taramidala Jedi Grand Master star 4

    Registered:
    Jun 18, 1999
    Oooooh my goodness. How dark, and beautiful, and yet...it all makes sense. Padme's inner life here is just so interesting, and the fraught guilt she and Obi-Wan feel (but don't necessarily say out loud) is tangible. I know you said it was a one shot, and I don't intend to offend with my greed, but...dare we hope for a continuation of some sort? :)

    Wonderful job.
     
  3. JadeLotus

    JadeLotus Jedi Grand Master star 4

    Registered:
    Mar 27, 2005
    Wow, what an interesting AU! Certainly a new take on Lady Vader - beautiful written and heartbreaking.

    I love the idea of the twins raised by Obi-Wan and Ahsoka on Naboo, and Mara by the Organas - what an interesting twist. Like taramidala I certainly would love to read more in this universe if you were so inclined.
     
  4. AngelQueen

    AngelQueen Jedi Master star 4

    Registered:
    Mar 1, 2001
    taramidala - Thanks! I'm thrilled you enjoyed this little 'what if'! Guilt is one of the prevailing themes in this story, and how Padmé and Obi-Wan deal with it. Obi-Wan's reaction was to kind of break and sort of devote himself to protecting the twins (he was very likely more involved in the decision for him to accompany them to Naboo than Padmé lets on, what with this being from her point of view and all), whereas Padmé basically goes undercover to destroy this monstrosity that is the Empire from the inside. She basically cuts herself off from all emotion - her friendship with people like Bail Organa, her love for her children and in particular for her husband. In a way, it's a more extreme version of canon. Whereas Obi-Wan and Yoda maintained that Vader consumed and destroyed Anakin, Padmé thinks that Anakin was Vader all along and she was too blind to see it, making that one reason why she took him out.

    As for whether or not there will be more, I admit that I am tempted to explore this AU a little bit more. I don't know exactly what I would write, but I'm keeping myself open to the possibilities. :)

    JadeLotus - Thank you! So glad you liked my take on the Lady Vader genre. :D The mention of Ahsoka was actually kind of last minute, when I realized that there needed to be someone covering for Obi-Wan in watching over the twins when he goes to see Padmé on Coruscant. Ahsoka immediately popped her head up and gave me this very intimidating look. ;) As for Mara, I admit I have this huge curiosity about what Mara would have been like if she'd been raised by a loving family. And as I told taramidala, I am definitely keeping my options open in regards to writing more for this 'verse. I can't say that it would ever be a huge, solid epic, but perhaps more little snapshots of life or something. Thanks again! ;)
     
  5. WarmNyota_SweetAyesha

    WarmNyota_SweetAyesha Game Host star 7 VIP - Game Host

    Registered:
    Aug 31, 2004
    Superb! Exquisitely plausible. =D= I would adore it if this blossomed into a longer thingy or a collection of snapshots, truly. [face_batting] :cool: !!!!!!
     
    AzureAngel2 likes this.
  6. divapilot

    divapilot Force Ghost star 4

    Registered:
    Nov 30, 2005
    Creepy and very plausible. Elegantly done! I really like how Padme has compromised herself without even realizing it. The domestic warped husband/wife situation really plays well against the warped political situation.
    There is definitely more than one revolution that has been started here.
     
  7. AngelQueen

    AngelQueen Jedi Master star 4

    Registered:
    Mar 1, 2001
    Nyota's Heart - Thanks! So thrilled you liked it! I'm keeping my fingers crossed that the muse will cooperate in writing more for this 'verse. :)

    divapilot - It's a good point, Padmé is really compromising herself. Much of it is done willingly, as she sees it as her fault that a lot of it happened in the first place (never mind that the Sith have been planning on this sort of thing for centuries). She sees all of this as her mess to clean up, and she devotes herself to it with a singleminded determination, even at the cost of her relationships and indeed her very soul. It's kind of a situation of her staring into the abyss and the abyss staring back into her. She's becoming as twisted as Vader in her own way. Thanks for the review! :D
     
  8. Kahara

    Kahara Force Ghost star 4

    Registered:
    Mar 3, 2001
    Wow, now that's a dark AU. :eek: Like the twist of Padme being the Empress and how Vader does everything (supposedly) for her. The description of her throne at the opening scene is especially effective, just whoa. I'm impressed at how messed up and twisted her reasoning is while still feeling Padme-ish. And I can't help but wonder with the other commentors... what happens now? Vader's dead, but is Padme really able to let go of being Empress? It looks questionable. [face_thinking]
     
  9. AzureAngel2

    AzureAngel2 Force Ghost star 6

    Registered:
    Jun 14, 2005
    It’s Obi-Wan’s strangled gasp that makes her open her eyes again and look up. A bright light has appeared, fiery even in the evening sky. An explosion, large and unforgiving. Then, as quickly as it appeared, it faded, leaving only a faint hint of the burning wreckage that is now lingering in orbit.
     
    It’s done. He is dead. She sacrificed much of the Five-Oh-First in the process, but she knows there was no hope for it. He’d never have gone without his personal troops, the men he trusted with his life.
     
    It had to be done, but that does nothing to negate the terrible pain blooming inside her. It does nothing to comfort Obi-Wan who has sunk to his knees, a single hand remaining on the balcony railing, holding on with a white-knuckle grip. She doesn’t reach out to him, somehow knowing that her comfort will not be welcomed.
     
    They stay side-by-side in silence, knowing that it will not last. Soon enough, people will start pouring into the throne room, full of questions and reports and looking to her for answers and leadership. As ever.
     
    “What now?” There is still a faint, hitching sob in Obi-Wan’s voice.
     
    She doesn’t hesitate. It’s what she has been planning for. “Now, the revolution begins.”

    Wow! That AU story made me gasp hard. Padmé willingly sacrificing the man she once loved and who has become a blood thirsty monster.

    And the balcony moment from AOTC, turned and twisted.

    Brilliantly written. Also Obi-Wan.

    Your strong characterisations and plot line are even better than my beloved "Dune" novels by Frank Herbert.
     
    Nyota's Heart likes this.
  10. KELIA

    KELIA Manager Emeritus star 6 VIP - Former Mod/RSA

    Registered:
    Jul 26, 2005
    Wow - that was intense.

    Interesting to see this side of Padme....makes me want a sequel. It would be very interesting to see what happened after Anakin/Vader's death.

    Very well done

    =D==D==D==D=
     
    AzureAngel2 and Nyota's Heart like this.
  11. AngelQueen

    AngelQueen Jedi Master star 4

    Registered:
    Mar 1, 2001
    Kahara - Heh, so glad you liked how utterly messed up Padmé is. It's true, she's not exactly the sanest person in the room. As for whether Padmé will give up her Empress-ship, well, as crazy and twisted as she is, one thing remains true - she is a true believer in democracy. Her taking up the position of Empress wasn't entirely of her own free will - basically it was either her or Vader, and she - like any other person with anything remotely resembling a brain - knew what a disaster that would be. So she took it, with the hope and determination to tear it down and restore/reform the Republic. It's been a few years now, and she's definitely suffered some mental corruption, as it were, from the constant presence of Darth Hubby, but her goals still remain the same. She just no longer really has any desire to be constrained by morality. So if she has to sacrifice nearly an entire battalion of troops just to kill the chief threat to the Republic's rebirth? It's chump change in the long run in her mind. Again, not the sanest person in the room. Whether she'll be in a position to give up power publicly... well, that remains to be seen. ;)

    AzureAngel2 - Better than Dune? [face_blush][face_blush][face_blush] Well, I don't know about that, but thank you so much for the lovely compliment! Oh yes, Padmé is not letting things like love stop her from achieving her number one goal here. And as far as she's concerned, Anakin has revealed himself for the monster that she ignored for years - taking him out is a public service in her mind, no matter how much it hurt a small part of her to do so.

    Hah, you totally caught me! That balcony scene was definitely a deliberate twist on the AotC balcony scene! :D

    Also, yes, Obi-Wan. Poor dearheart nearly made me break down a few times. *cuddles Obi-Wan*

    KELIA - Thank you! So glad you liked it. :)
     
    Findswoman, Ewok Poet and AzureAngel2 like this.
  12. Ewok Poet

    Ewok Poet Force Ghost star 6

    Registered:
    Jul 31, 2014
    Yay for Evil!Padmé! This is the kind of a shade of grey that one can nothing but enjoy. Sure, she will get rid of Hutts if they continue to be into slavery, sure she halted Death Star for the time-being and freed the Wookiees...but that does not actually excuse an absolutist for being an absolutist and, well, killing own husband in the end. It almost seems that she [hl=black]manipulated Obi-Wan to do this for the Republic...and yeah, some tooka, very likely...while she is certain she would remain an Empress[/hl].

    In case there is anything more in this warped kind of a world, I would welcome it with my arms wide open!
     
    Findswoman likes this.
  13. AngelQueen

    AngelQueen Jedi Master star 4

    Registered:
    Mar 1, 2001
    Ewok Poet - Thank you!! Writing the characters in these kinds of grey is ten kinds of fun, and I thoroughly enjoyed writing Padmé in this manner especially. It's my thought that those characters who are an enormous force for good - Padmé, Obi-Wan, etc. - can also be huge forces for... not so good. Hence why I adore dark!Padmé and dark!Obi-Wan so much. It's thrilling to explore that aspect of their personalities. In this case, given that Padmé just blew up the Star Destroyer containing Vader and the 501st, the Hutts are going to be the last thing on everyone's minds. In truth, her opponents are going to see her position as dangerously weakened. They didn't dare strike at her so long as she had a guy who would Force-choke an entire planet just to protect her, but now? As for Obi-Wan, I think in Padmé's own mind, she still cares for him, holds him dear. She knew when she took up the job of being Empress that there were going to be some really bad things she was going to have to do, and she didn't want Obi-Wan to be sullied by them, so she packed him off to Naboo with the twins. She doesn't want to be Empress forever, but whether she'll be willing to let it go or not remains to be seen. She wants to rebuild the Republic - because let's face it, the Republic was a mess even before Palpatine came onto the scene and mucked it up - but it's hard to say if she'll be willing to let go of her control over everything. She wants it done, but does she trust anyone else to do it?

    I certainly hope to write more for this 'verse some day. There's so much to say for it, but will the muse cooperate? One can only hope. :)
     
  14. Findswoman

    Findswoman Force Ghost star 5

    Registered:
    Feb 27, 2014
    Wow. What a very dark and intriguing AU you have here, and I just wish I hadn't missed it the first time around. Arguably, this dark!Padmé is more interesting and complex than the good!Padmé of the films. On one hand, she's a ruthless totalitarian empress who rules with an iron hand and is not above [hl=black]sending her husband and a whole regiment of troops off on a hopeless mission only to kill them[/hl]. There are aspects of the David and Bathsheba story here, and overtones of G. K. Chesterton's chilling "The Sign of the Broken Sword." On the other hand, if I'm understanding your story aright, it looks as though she entered that position precisely so she could subvert the Empire from within, and she uses her position to do things like crack down hard on slavery. All while having doubts about said position; and it's telling that Obi-Wan's gentle, less-dark presence is what brings those doubts out. But those doubts are arguably what lead her to, well, press the button. Gray area is very gray, and you did a great job with it.

    The idea of this Padmé controlling even Anakin/Vader—the supposed evilest, cruelest man in the Galaxy—is absolutely chilling; sort of a dark, twisted take on that (admittedly problematic) "behind every great man, there is a great woman" trope. etc. And in that connection...
    ...I found the "racy" portion that you posted on AO3 especially effective, because in their little... lovemaking scene we see that Anakin thinks he's in charge, thinks he's dominant. It heightens the impact of his stab-in-the-back death later.

    Incredible work! =D=
     
    Kahara and Ewok Poet like this.
  15. AngelQueen

    AngelQueen Jedi Master star 4

    Registered:
    Mar 1, 2001
    Findswoman - Thank you! So thrilled that you liked the story! Good!Padmé is wonderful and ten kinds of brilliant, but dark!Padmé is just so supremely fascinating and fun to play with. You're quite right, Padmé took the throne Anakin handed her so as to destroy the new Empire from within. One thing about Padmé is that she is quite good at adapting, and by the time Anakin had killed Palpatine and was ready to push her up to take his place, she had already resigned herself to taking it, again to destroy everything from the inside, but also because she knew that if she didn't take it, Anakin himself would, and that would be Supremely Bad. As for the Hutt mission, she likely has every intention of eradicating slavery, but not through annihilating the Hutts as Anakin wanted to do. The mission was a ruse to get Anakin onboard the sabotaged Star Destroyer. The 501st were mostly collateral damage, but also it's possible that Padmé may have felt that their loyalty to her was not guaranteed, and the last thing she need was for them to go nuts and try to assassinate her for killing Anakin.

    As for her doubts, they are something she lives with every day, but at the same time, she does not let them hinder her. She's forced herself to shrug off every measure of morality in order to redraw the map, to build a better world and restore true democracy to the galaxy. Padmé figured out pretty quickly that she'd have to do some really terrible things in order to achieve this goal, and so was determined to go alone. That's another reason why she sent Obi-Wan and the twins away. Obi-Wan, though broken and devastated by what had happened to Anakin, was still relatively intact and sane, and she trusted him to love and look after the twins. She did not want the three of them tainted by what she was about to do.

    As for the AO3 version, I'm thrilled you enjoyed the little extra bit that is found here. That version is actually the original one, this one being the edited take for the rules of content here on the boards. I admit, I hadn't thought of that section in those terms, but it is a great point! :)
     
    Kahara, Findswoman and Ewok Poet like this.